Translation Debates – A Jewish View

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by gb93433, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. gb93433

    gb93433
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    An updated version of the New International Version (NIV) has come out this year, and of course, controversy abounds. Few issues stir up evangelical Christian passions more than Bible translation.


    Knowing the reverence that Jews have for the Text, I was curious what opinion they’d have. What translation do they consider authoritative? What kind of debates have they gone through? You’d think they’d have a strong opinion about such a holy text.


    The Scriptures that they call their Bible are comprised of the same books as in the Protestant Old Testament. They often refer to it as the Tanakh, an acronym that comes from the three sections: the Torah, the Neviim (Prophets) and the Ketuvim (Writings). Jesus used similar divisions in Luke 24:44.


    Considering this question led me to a surprising observation. As much debate as I’ve heard among Jews, the one thing I’ve never encountered is an argument over which English Bible translation is the most authoritative. You simply never hear discussions analogous to the “KJV Only” controversy. For quite a while, I scratched my head over why this might be.


    The rest of the story is at http://ourrabbijesus.com/articles/translation-debates-jewish-view/
     
  2. glfredrick

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    Actually, there are about 6 widely-used English versions, but the preferred version is in Hebrew or Yiddish.

    They have similar issues with the Englisn translations that we do.
     
  3. franklinmonroe

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    I read the article. Interestingly, the writer fails to mention two obvious facts that affect the Jewish opinion of most major English translations--

    First, that they don't come without the New Testament! You can usually buy the NT separately in major English translations, but rarely can you find the 'Old Testament' alone.

    Second, most of the major English translations have been 'Christian' and/or Protestant productions with distinctly non-Jewish perspectives in both the renderings and study notes.
     
    #3 franklinmonroe, Mar 2, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 2, 2012
  4. gb93433

    gb93433
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    The lady is majoring on the historical background of the NT found in first century Judaism.
     
  5. franklinmonroe

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    Did you read the article? (Hint: there is no mention of the "NT" in the one I read).
     
  6. gb93433

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    Did you read, "The lady is majoring on the historical background of the NT found in first century Judaism." She is a Christian and has written a few books on the historical background of the NT found in Judaism. Her books should be required reading before anyone enters the pulpit. Her books are that well written and researched.
     
  7. franklinmonroe

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    Nope. I don't see that on the linked page anywhere.
     
  8. gb93433

    gb93433
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    It wasn't. I know that from reading some of her books.
     

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