Trusting Jesus = Justification

Discussion in 'Free-For-All Archives' started by Ray Berrian, Aug 18, 2003.

  1. Ray Berrian

    Ray Berrian
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    'Whereas forgiveness is the negative side of salvation, justification is the positive side. To justify is to declare righteous the one who has faith in Jesus Christ. It is a forensic {legal} act of God whereby He declares the believing sinner righteous on the basis of the blood of Christ. The major emphasis of justification is positive and involves two main aspects. It involves the pardon and removal of all sins and the end of separation from God. [Acts 13:39; Romans 4:6-7; 5:9-11; II Corinthians 5:19] It also involves the bestowal of righteousness upon the believing person and "a title to all the blessings promised to the just." Dr. J.I. Packer, "Justification," in Walter A. Elwell, ed., Evangelical Dictionary of Theology (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1984), p. 594.

    'Justification is a gift given through the grace of God (Rom. 3:24) and takes place the moment the individual has faith in Christ (Romans 4:2; 5:1). The ground of justification is the death of Christ (Romans 5:9), apart from any works (Romans 4:5). The means of justification is faith (Romans 5:1). Through justification God maintains His integrity and His standard {of righteousness and holiness Ray's inclusion} and is able to enter into fellowship with sinners because they have the very righteousness of Christ imputed to them. {Romans 4:6 Ray's inclusion}

    Justification is a peculiarly Pauline term. The verb is used forty times in the New Testament, but Paul uses the word twenty-nine times. Drs. William F. Arndt and F. Wilbur Gingrich, "A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature" 2nd ed., edited by F. Wilbur Gingrich and Frederick W. Danker (Chicago: University of Chicago, 1979, p. 159-81.

    Dr. James I. Packer, D. Phil., is or was on the faculty of Regent College in Vancouver, B.C. and is the author of numerous articles and books, including "I Want To Be a Christian and Knowing God."
     
  2. John Gilmore

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  3. Ray Berrian

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    John Gilmore,

    Thanks for your clarity of insight. I too, have read of Erasmus (1466-1536) who was admitted to the Catholic priesthood and took the vows of a monk. He was a gifted man with the original language and his translation became the 'textus receptus' meaning the received text. It was used by the leaders of the Reformation as the basis of their common language versions of the New Testament. He corrected the errors in the Latin texts and called attention to the original Greek for purposes of translation.

    The word 'being justified' in Romans 3:24 is the basic word, {dikaioo} and means to render or regard as just, innocent, free, or just. I believe the Lord God counts the sinner who has had faith in Jesus as having a clear record before the throne of His holiness, because of the atonement of Jesus who covers those sins. But, although Jesus covers those sins He does not ignore our subsequent sins as believers, but will also sanctify we believers who are in Christ, more and more each day {Romans 8:29} so we might be eventually ' . . . conformed to the image of the Son of God our Savior.'

    Does the Roman Church have a doctrinal statement about justification in their official catechism?
     
  4. John Gilmore

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    We are "simul iustus et peccator," simultaneously saint and sinner. We daily sin much; therefore, we must walk in repentance and faith trusting in the merits of Christ alone for forgiveness.

    Ray, here is the Roman Catholic doctrine of justification:

    Catholics, Calvinists, and Arminians have much in common. They all believe that man cooperates with the Holy Spirit in their justification.
     
  5. thessalonian

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    Catholics, Calvinists, and Arminians have much in common. They all believe that man cooperates with the Holy Spirit in their justification. </font>[/QUOTE]John,

    First of all that is not all that the CCC has to say about justification. Why don't you post it all? or are you just picking and choosing in order to present it in the worst light according to your beliefs?

    617. "The Council of Trent emphasizes the unique character of Christ's sacrifice as 'the source of eternal salvation'[Heb 5:9 .] and teaches that 'his most holy Passion on the wood of the cross merited JUSTIFICATION for us.'[Council of Trent: DS 1529.] And the Church venerates his cross as she sings: 'Hail, O Cross, our only hope.'[LH, Lent, Holy Week, Evening Prayer, Hymn Vexilla Regis.]"

    977. "Our Lord tied the forgiveness of sins to faith and Baptism: 'Go into all the world and preach the gospel to the whole creation. He who believes and is baptized will be saved.'[Mk 16:15-16 .] Baptism is the first and chief sacrament of forgiveness of sins because it unites us with Christ, who died for our sins and rose for our JUSTIFICATION, so that 'we too might walk in newness of life.'[Rom 6:4 ; Cf. Rom 4:25 .]"

    987. "'In the forgiveness of sins, both priests and sacraments are instruments which our Lord Jesus Christ, the only author and liberal giver of salvation, wills to use in order to efface our sins and give us the grace of JUSTIFICATION' (Roman Catechism, I, 11, 6)."

    1266. "The Most Holy Trinity gives the baptized sanctifying grace, the grace of JUSTIFICATION:
    - enabling them to believe in God, to hope in him, and to love him through the theological virtues;
    - giving them the power to live and act under the prompting of the Holy Spirit through the gifts of the Holy Spirit;
    - allowing them to grow in goodness through the moral virtues.
    Thus the whole organism of the Christian's supernatural life has its roots in Baptism. "

    1446. "Christ instituted the sacrament of Penance for all sinful members of his Church: above all for those who, since Baptism, have fallen into grave sin, and have thus lost their baptismal grace and wounded ecclesial communion. It is to them that the sacrament of Penance offers a new possibility to convert and to recover the grace of JUSTIFICATION. The Fathers of the Church present this sacrament as 'the second plank (of salvation) after the shipwreck which is the loss of grace.'[Tertullian, De Paenit. 4, 2: PL 1,1343; cf. Council of Trent (1547): DS 1542.]"

    1990. "JUSTIFICATION detaches man from sin which contradicts the love of God, and purifies his heart of sin. JUSTIFICATION follows upon God's merciful initiative of offering forgiveness. It reconciles man with God. It frees from the enslavement to sin, and it heals. "

    1991. "JUSTIFICATION is at the same time the acceptance of God's righteousness through faith in Jesus Christ. Righteousness (or 'justice') here means the rectitude of divine love. With JUSTIFICATION, faith, hope, and charity are poured into our hearts, and obedience to the divine will is granted us."

    1996. "Our JUSTIFICATION comes from the grace of God. Grace is favor, the free and undeserved help that God gives us to respond to his call to become children of God, adoptive sons, partakers of the divine nature and of eternal life.[Cf. Jn 1:12-18 ; Jn 17:3 ; Rom 8:14-17 ; 2Pet 1:3-4.]"


    Do you have any problems with any of this besides the part about confession?

    Secondly how did you come up with that conclusion from the paragraph you quote.

    "Catholics, Calvinists, and Arminians have much in common. They all believe that man cooperates with the Holy Spirit in their justification. "


    The CCC says "no one can merit the initial grace of forgiveness and justification".
    The paragraph you quote says we merit sanctification not justificaiton. I am not neccessarily disagreeing with your conclusion. I am just saying that you cannot draw it from the paragraph you quoted.

    Here is an article on Justification by Mr. James Akin whom I am sure is much more adept at explaining Catholic doctrine than Mr. Gillmore.

    http://www.cin.org/users/james/files/justcath.htm

    Blessings John (and Ray).
     
  6. Ray Berrian

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    Thessalonian,

    I am pleased to know that the Roman and Eastern Orthodox churches have a strong statement of the reality of justification.

    I personally like this plank of theology the best.

    1996. "Our JUSTIFICATION comes from the grace of God. Grace is favor,
    the free and undeserved help that God gives us to respond to his call to
    become children of God, adoptive sons, partakers of the divine nature and of
    eternal life.[Cf. Jn 1:12-18 ; Jn 17:3 ; Rom 8:14-17 ; 2Pet 1:3-4.]"

    I think this is the weakest of the several you offered up to us.

    1446. "Christ instituted the sacrament of Penance for all sinful members of
    his Church: above all for those who, since Baptism, have fallen into grave
    sin, and have thus lost their baptismal grace and wounded ecclesial
    communion. It is to them that the sacrament of Penance offers a new
    possibility to convert and to recover the grace of JUSTIFICATION. The
    Fathers of the Church present this sacrament as 'the second plank (of
    salvation) after the shipwreck which is the loss of grace.'[Tertullian, De
    Paenit. 4, 2: PL 1,1343; cf. Council of Trent (1547): DS 1542.]"

    You use the word, Penance, and I think this is our equivalent of confession of sin to the Lord, when fellowship is broken between the erring saint and Almighty God. It is a matter of semantics.

    I grew up in a church that had a most definite leaning toward Arminianism. When arriving at Bible college I believe that a person might be saved twice if his sin necessitated this experience, but not more than twice. And then I began to study what the Bible had to say about the matter. God's Word never speaks about a repeat in what the Lord has done for us when we are justified.

    Although God most deeply frowns and hates our sins after conversion we never completely lose His grace in our hearts. We might 'grieve' or 'quench' the Spirit, but He never abandons ship in our heart of hearts. If the Christian refuses to listen to the admonitions of Scripture while out of fellowship with God, then, our Lord must step into our lives with His providence of chastisement. [Hebrews 12:5]

    In the best sense of the word, we never recover our justification. We remain in a justified state of grace even when out of fellowship and closeness with our God. This is what makes sin so awful for those who backslide away from the Lord, because we then take advantage of His wonderful grace. That is what Paul means in Romans 6:1.

    Tertullian was not too far off the mark. Some true Christians do make 'shipwreck' of their faith, but that is in the human earthly side of things. God never gives up on the soul of a true believer. Example: I Timothy 1:19-20 speaks of two men who fell away from the faith and Paul delivered them to God, probably in his prayers, and God disciplined, chastised them for their erring ways. The Lord was teaching them not to blaspheme. If the Lord didn't give a care and had given up on their eternal soul, He would not have stepped into their lives with this extreme discipline to teach them to follow Christ more closely.

    Matthew Henry's Commentary says,

    'The primary design of the highest censure in the primitive church was to prevent further sin and to reclaim the {erring saint.} In this case it was for the destruction of the flesh, that the spirit/soul might be saved in the day of the Lord Jesus.' {Dr. Matthew Henry, "Matthew Henry's Commentary," Volume VI, p. 811, left column.} [I Corinthians 5:5; I Corinthians 3:13-15] The latter reference is to the Judgment Seat of Christ. [II Cor. 5:10] 'The destruction of the flesh' was some sickness or bodily disease that would awaken the Christian to his or her need to return to the Lord in a close fellowship with Him. Relationship to Christ was never broken in the case of Humenaeus and Alexander and never will be in the lives of those who truly have come to know the Lord as Savior and Shepherd of their lives. [John 10:1-30 & especially the thoughts of vs. 27-30 spoken by our Lord]

    Christians don't want to get in the cross fire of His judicial chastisement. Either we listen to His Word, the Bible, and follow Him closely or we bring on ourselves His severe discipline.
     
  7. Yelsew

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    Jesus' death on the cross JUSTIFIES US!

    Our Belief in Jesus SANCTIFIES US!

    His death removed our sins as grounds for our death for sinning. He paid the penalty that we ALL are liable for.

    We did not, Do not, and Can not do anything short of death to pay the penalty we owe for our sins.

    When man is being Judged, sin will not be a consideration for judgement, the penalty has already been paid.

    There has been nothing, is nothing, and will be nothing we can do to earn our own salvation. No human works merit salvation.

    When man is judged, man's works will not be a consideration for judgment, salvation is not of works...

    There is but one factor that keeps man from being judged (John 3:18) "No one who believes in him will be judged; but whoever does not believe is judged already, because that person does not believe in the Name of God's only Son."

    Jesus Justifies us!
    Our belief in Jesus Sanctifies us!
    Our Faith in Jesus Saves us!

    OH, WHAT GOOD NEWS!
     
  8. John Gilmore

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  9. Doubting Thomas

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    I don't know, most Calvinists I've read would cringe at the idea of man cooperating with God in regards to justification. :eek:
     
  10. Yelsew

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    I don't know, most Calvinists I've read would cringe at the idea of man cooperating with God in regards to justification. :eek: </font>[/QUOTE]Depends on what you include in "cooperate with".
     
  11. John Gilmore

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    I don't know, most Calvinists I've read would cringe at the idea of man cooperating with God in regards to justification. :eek: </font>[/QUOTE]
     
  12. Doubting Thomas

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    So God regenerates THEN man can choose NOT to have faith and be justified?
     
  13. BobRyan

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    There are two justifications in the NT. One is "Justification past". We find this in Romans 3, and 5. It is subjective, individual and totaly by grace apart from the works of the law.

    But in Romans 2 and James 2 - we find justifcation that is future, objective and corporate. It operates on the Matt 7 principle of Christ "by their fruits you shall know them". It reveals the fact of what already is and is seen in the model of Daniel 7's judgment.

    In Christ,

    Bob
     
  14. John Gilmore

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    So God regenerates THEN man can choose NOT to have faith and be justified? </font>[/QUOTE]Whether there is free will to reject the call seems to be the sticking point between Arminians and Calvinists; however, both groups make the response part of the process of justification.

    On the other hand, Lutherans believe there is no process of justification. The Word strikes the heart and man is immediately regenerated, forgiven, and given faith in Christ without any cooperation on his part.
     
  15. John Gilmore

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    Whether there is free will to reject the call seems to be the sticking point between Arminians and Calvinists; however, both groups make the response part of the process of justification.

    Catholics also believe that justification is a process and not simply a judicial act. So there is much common ground among Catholics, Calvinists, and Arminians.

    On the other hand, Lutherans believe there is no process of justification. The Word strikes the heart and man is immediately regenerated, forgiven, and given faith in Christ without any cooperation on his part.
     
  16. Ray Berrian

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    Charles C. Ryrie, a Th.D. from Dallas Theological Seminary and a Ph.D., from the University of Edinburg has said,

    'To justify means to declare righteous. Both the Hebrew {sadaq} and the Greek {dikaioo} words mean to announce or pronounce a favorable verdict, to declare righteous. The concept does not mean to make righteous, but to announce righteousness. It is a courtroom concept, so that to justify is to give a verdict of righteous. Notice the contrast between to justify and to condemn in Deuteronomy 25:1; I Kings 8:32; and Proverbs 17:15. Just as announcing condemnation does not make a person wicked, neither does justification make a person righteous. Condemning or justifying announces the true and actual state of the person. The wicked person is already wicked when the verdict of condemnation is pronounced. Likewise, the righteous person is already righteous when the verdict of justification is announced.' From "Basic Theology" Moody Press, Chicago, p. 343.

    As Christians we can say with the Apostle Paul, 'Who shall lay anything to the charge of God's elect? It is God Who justifies.' [Romans 8:33] In other words, if the Lord declares a Christian saved, no one else has anything to say about the matter. After all Christ died for our sins. [I Corinthians 15:3; I John 2:2] He not only died for our sins up until our conversion/faith in Christ/trust in Him, but for present and future sins.

    Dr. Paul Enns says in his text, "The Moody Handbook of Theology," Moody Press, p. 464,

    'As Luther, so also his followers taught that justification is based on the meritorious death of Christ, which death alone atoned for sins. The Augsburg Confession of 1530 explained justification as "to absolve a guilty man and pronounce him righteous, and to do so on account of someone else's righteousness, namely, Christ's."'

    Luther while studying Romans 1:17, came to the knowledge of justification by faith alone. 'For therein is the righteousness of God revealed from faith to faith; as it is written, The just shall live by faith.'
     
  17. John Gilmore

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    Dr. Enns is referring to this passage from the Apology to the Augsburg Confession of 1537:

     
  18. InTheNameOfLove

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    I'm siding with Yelsew. It's not 'Christ AND' or 'Christ BUT'; nope, just Christ. A million works could not pardon 1 sin, only death.
     
  19. Ray Berrian

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    John Gilmore,

    Thanks for you inclusion of the reality of our imputation. It is more than wonderful that Jesus has done this for all those who have trust in Him and now love Him. As Christians we are a blessed people because our Lord promises that never again will He impute sin to our personhood. [Romans 4:8] When we stand before the Lord in Heaven it will be only because of Him, His grace, and our belief in Him. [Ephesians 2:8-9; John 3:16] Truly it is wonderful!!
     
  20. Yelsew

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    Thanks InTheNameOfLove, It is very refreshing to see young people not only recognizing and knowing the truth in its purest form, but also speaking out in support of it. May our Lord Jesus bestow upon you his richest blessings for a long spiritually filled and fulfilled life.

    You know the truth, don't keep it a secret!
     

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