unauthorized editions of A. V.?

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Logos1560, Jan 26, 2009.

  1. Logos1560

    Logos1560
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2004
    Messages:
    3,127
    Likes Received:
    2
    Are many present editions of the KJV actually "unauthorized" editions?

    In his book entitled I Will Have One Doctrine & One Discipline: An Essay on the Influence of Religion and Politics on the Formation of the King James Bible, Ross Purdy asked: "Should King James Bibles be purchased from unauthorised publishers (which would be virtually any printer outside of Great Britain)? If one does purchase a 'boot-leg' copy, are they not dishonoring King James and his translators by not buying his Bible from the crown's authorised printers?" (p. 52).

    Purdy asserted: "its authorization was also of a particular form which included the Apocrypha and calender tables of Catholic feast days that readers were expected to celebrate" (p. 52).

    Purdy wrote: "Someone did some picking and choosing and left out authorised parts of the original publication (Dedicatory, Translators to the Reader, Festival Caldender, Apocrypha [also 1611 marginal notes, chapter headings or contents, postscripts to some N. T. books, etc.])! Who would do this? There was no decision by any church council or authorities to leave out these original portions of this version. Rather, unauthorised printers looking to make an economy version left out all these parts. So if we are going to champion this version for exclusive use, why are we not using the entire version as authorised by its church?" (p. 53).
     
  2. EdSutton

    EdSutton
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    8,755
    Likes Received:
    0
    Exactly!

    I have previously raised similar questions, here. You may have noticed I have referred to "counterfeit" KJVs, in the past. This has nothing to do with the text, FTR.

    BTW, the author of this book is undoubtedly British, as well, given his usage of the decidedly British variant of "authorize," and probably an Anglican, as well, considering some of his arguments.

    Ed
     
    #2 EdSutton, Jan 26, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 26, 2009
  3. Jerome

    Jerome
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    5,623
    Likes Received:
    45
    Anglican? More likely Presbyterian and Scottish.
    That's where a lot of the KJV conspiracy theories originate.
     
  4. franklinmonroe

    franklinmonroe
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    2,872
    Likes Received:
    3
    It would seem to be a moral contradiction for a true Christian to recognize something as 'authorized' but then to dubiously obtain that officially protected item through unauthorized means.
     
  5. Thermodynamics

    Thermodynamics
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    356
    Likes Received:
    0
    Rights in the Authorized Version are vested in the Crown and extend only so far as the borders of Great Britain. Outside of Britian the Authorized Version is considered public domain and may be reproduced at will without infringing on the rights of the Crown. There is nothing dubious about this and I am sure that Queen Elizabeth is in no way offended by an AV Bible being printed outside of Great Britain.
     
    #5 Thermodynamics, Jan 26, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 26, 2009
  6. Thermodynamics

    Thermodynamics
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    356
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sorry, I am still figuring out how to use the functions of this forum.
     
  7. Logos1560

    Logos1560
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2004
    Messages:
    3,127
    Likes Received:
    2
    Those statements were not true before 1776.

    In the reference work Dictionary of Christianity in America, this fact is stated: "Before the Revolutionary War, the publication of English-language Bibles was prohibited in America, since the King's printers in England enjoyed an exclusive copyright to printing the KJV" (p. 132). De Hamel observed: "It had not been legal to publish any English Bible in North America while it was a British colony" (The Book, p. 259). Margaret Hills wrote: "After the Revolution American printers felt no compunction to heed the British monopoly on the printing of the King James Bible" (English Bible in America, p. xvii). Christopher Anderson noted that “the American edition was printed in defiance of all British restrictions, in the year 1782” (Annals, II, p. 568).

    Is the KJV considered in public domain in Canada?
     

Share This Page

Loading...