Veterans Day

Discussion in 'All Other Discussions' started by Salty, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. Salty

    Salty
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    Veterans Day will be here shortly.

    How many vets do we have. Would you like to mention a little about your military time, where you were station (& when), your MOS, ect
     
  2. ktn4eg

    ktn4eg
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    USAF (21 Sept 1964 - 15 Apr 1969) Sgt (E-4)
    Aircraft electrician (esp on F/RF-4C Phantom II fighers)
    Basic Training -- Lackland AFB TX
    Tech School -- Chanute AFB IL
    PCS assignments:
    Davis-Monthan AFB AZ
    Ramstein AB Germany

    TN Air National Guard, 118 Airlift Wing, Nashville Int Airport (06 Aug 1989 - 13 Jan 2005) Tsgt (E-6)
    Avionics Guidance & Control Systems on C-130H transport aircraft
     
  3. Tom Bryant

    Tom Bryant
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    Served in Viet Nam (72-73) with a special operations group as an E-6
    My MOS was 11 Bravo
    My main base was Nha Trang but I served in a variety of fire bases and on LRP teams. But I also was at Fort Benning and Bragg.
     
  4. Jon-Marc

    Jon-Marc
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    US Air Force
    Sergeant--E-4
    1965-1972
    Stationed all over US and in England
     
  5. billreber

    billreber
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    Air Force, 1972-92
    stationed in many US bases* and in Saudi Arabia
    recreation specialist for 13 years, manpower management for 7 years
    Made to Master Sergeant (E-7)

    *In order:
    Lackland AFB, TX
    Peterson Field/AFB, CO
    USAF Academy, CO (as a cadet, but resigned because I felt God wanted me to do something else, had to go back enlisted)
    Fairchild AFB, WA
    Elmendorf AFB, AK
    Baudette AFS, MN
    Fairchild AFB, WA
    Dhahran, Saudi Arabia
    Fairchild AFB, WA
    Chanute AFB, WA
     
  6. Salty

    Salty
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    Teachout, Robert, H
    Laundry # T-2527
    MOS 76P (Supply); 71L (Admin)
    Additional duties: Re-up NCO
    Active Duty Rank - E-6
    State Guard Rank E-7
    1970 - 2008

    1970 Basic - Fort Dix, NJ, B-6-3
    1970 AIT -Fort Lee, VA, Co M,
    70-71 OJT - Atlanta Army Depot,Ga, Co B
    71-73 USA MATCOM, Zweibruecken, GY
    73-74 USAR, INACTIVE
    74 ......BMO, HHC 240TH QM, FORT LEE, VA
    74-77 21ST SPT BDE, ZWEIBRUECKEN, GY
    78-80 CO D, 124TH MAINT BN
    .....2ND ARMORED DIV, FORT HOOD, TX
    81-82 CSC, 1/68 ARMOR, 8TH INF DIV
    .....WILDFLECKEN, GY
    82-83 CO A, 8TH SUPPLY & TRANS BN, .....BAD KRUESNACK, GY
    83 III CORPS G-4 - CRIT, FORT HOOD, TX
    83-85 1/8 CALVARY, 1ST CALVARY DIVISION,
    .....FORT HOOD, TX
    86 DISCOM, 6TH INF DIV,
    .....FT RICHARDSON, ALASKA
    86-92 VETERAN
    92-97 CO C, 1ST BN, 4TH BDE, VIRGINIA
    ..... DEFENSE FORCE, PULASKI, VA
    97-2004 VETERAN
    04-07 1ST BN, 3RD REGT, 10TH BDE,
    .....NEW YORK GUARD, SYRACUSE, NY
    07- PRESENT RETIRED

    CURRENTLY MEMBER OF:
    NCOA
    SGAUS
    1 CAV ASSOCIATION
    AMERICAN LEGION
    DISABLED VETERANS OF AMERICA
    ARMED FORCES RECOGNITION COMMITTEE
     
  7. Carolina Baptist

    Carolina Baptist
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    Coast Guard '82 to '87
    Boatswain's Mate
    Small boat search and rescue
    Boot Camp in Cape May NJ
    Stationed at Group Cape May
    Summers at Station Townsend Inlent
    Winters were spent repairing the boats that we tore up in the summer.
     
  8. shodan

    shodan
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    History of Veteran's Day

    Marine Corps, 03,
    70-73

    Here is a bit on the history of Veterans Day from my recent book, Oh Holy Night: The Peace of 1914:

    By October of 1918, everywhere, hopes were rising
    for an armistice. In the first week, Austria-Hungary
    and Germany had sent notes to the United States,
    seeking an armistice based on President Woodrow
    Wilson's “Fourteen Points.”
    73
    Armistice: The Ending of Hostilities
    On 11 November, the warring parties signed the armistice,
    bringing that great bloodbath to an end.
    Only those who suffered through those cataclysmic
    events truly understood the meaning of that day.
    On the Continent, Russia and Germany had each
    seen 1.7 million of their own soldiers slaughtered.
    Between them, some 9 million were wounded.
    France saw 1.3 million of its soldiers sacrificed, and
    over 4 million wounded. Austria-Hungary suffered
    about the same number of tragic loses.
    Great Britain mourned almost a million soldiers and
    twice that number suffered wounds.
    The United States, which had only been in the war
    for a year and some months (but a very long year for
    those military men), saw over 100,000 of its own men
    killed and over a quarter million wounded.
    The deep meaning of that armistice remained in the
    minds of World War I veterans a half century later
    when the U.S. Congress, in one of its clueless moves,
    changed the observance of the federal holiday from
    November 11th to a certain Monday of October. Memorial
    Day, Veterans Day and Washington's Birthday
    were all moved on the calendar in order to create
    three-day federal holiday weekends.
    Because of the war that had followed that “War to
    End All Wars,” President Eisenhower had signed a
    law that broadened the meaning of “Armistice Day”
    by making it “Veterans Day” in 1954. But in the
    minds of the World War I generation, the memory of
    that armistice still held sway.
    74
    Oh Holy Night
    So, in the late 1960s when Congress changed the
    date, I can still remember my grandmother adamantly
    asserting that Armistice Day was November 11th,
    NOT the fourth Monday of October. The thousands
    of soldiers who, like my grandfather, had served in
    France and other lands would not hear of such a
    change.
    So, South Dakota and Mississippi refused to follow
    the federal lead. And one by one, the other states began
    reverting back to the November 11th observance.
    And the politicians received an earful. The World War
    I generation was still alive and well; remembering
    and speaking up. They again took back lost ground.
    The end result was that one decade after changing
    the date, Congress, in 1978, restored the observance
    to November 11th.
    The height and depth of the longing for an end to
    that bloody war was revealed in the celebrations that
    broke out on November 7, 1918. Following a reply to
    the German government from President Wilson, on
    that date, the Chief of Staff of the German Army, von
    Hindenburg, sent a telegram to the Allied Supreme
    Commander seeking a date for negotiating that armistice.
    A mistaken news report declared that the
    armistice had been signed. And despite all attempts
    by capitols and headquarters to correct the mistake,
    celebrations broke out around the world....
     
  9. Pastor Timothy

    Pastor Timothy
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    US Marine Corps
    1986-1991

    SEMPER FI
     
  10. Jim1999

    Jim1999
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    For England and Canada, it was and still is: the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month....We Shall Remember.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  11. Salty

    Salty
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    May we never forget. Often on important dates - such as 7 Dec, I will ask a youngster (under 30) what is important about the day in history - and they dont know :tear:
     

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