Virtually Legal

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by KenH, Nov 13, 2009.

  1. KenH

    KenH
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    Virtually legal

    [SIZE=-2][FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif]Nov 12th 2009 [/FONT]
    [SIZE=-2][FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif]From The Economist print edition[/FONT][/SIZE]
    [/SIZE]
    [FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif][SIZE=-1]In many countries, full jails, stretched budgets and a general weariness with the war on drugs have made prohibition harder to enforce.[/SIZE][/FONT]

    [FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif][SIZE=-1]The Green Relief “natural health clinic” in a bohemian part of San Francisco doesn’t sound like an ordinary doctor’s surgery. For those who wonder about the sort of relief provided, its logo—a cannabis leaf—is a clue. Inside, in under an hour and for $99, patients can get a doctor’s letter allowing them to smoke marijuana in California with no fear of prosecution. In a state that pioneered bans on smoking tobacco, smoking cannabis is now easier than almost anywhere in the world.[/SIZE][/FONT]

    [FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif][SIZE=-1]California, with its network of pot-friendly physicians, offers the most visible evidence of a tentative worldwide shift towards a more liberal policy on drugs. Although most countries remain bound by a trio of United Nations conventions that prohibit the sale and possession of narcotics, laws are increasingly being bent or ignored. That is true even in the United States, where the Obama administration has announced that registered cannabis dispensaries will no longer be raided by federal authorities.[/SIZE][/FONT]

    ...

    [FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif][SIZE=-1]Reformers are in a bold mood. Earlier this year a report by ex-presidents of Brazil, Colombia and Mexico called for alternatives to prohibition. On November 12th a British think-tank, Transform, launched a report* setting out ideas on how drugs could be legally regulated. For every substance from cannabis to crack, it suggests a form of regulation, via doctors’ prescriptions, pharmacy sales or consumption on licensed premises.[/SIZE][/FONT]

    [FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif][SIZE=-1]That world is still some way off. But a debate about regulation is increasingly drowning out the one about enforcement.[/SIZE][/FONT]

    ...

    [FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif][SIZE=-1]Elsewhere in the United States, there are many signs of prohibition ebbing away. Some 14 states have decriminalised the possession of marijuana for personal use (medical or otherwise), though most keep the option of a $100 civil penalty. Three states—New Mexico, Rhode Island and Massachusetts—license non-profit corporations to grow medical marijuana. Most radically, some states are considering legalising the drug completely. California and Massachusetts are holding committee hearings on bills to legalise pot outright; Oregon is expected to introduce such a bill within the next couple of weeks.[/SIZE][/FONT]

    [FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif][SIZE=-1]One reason for the sudden popularity of cannabis is financial. Tom Ammiano, the California assemblyman who introduced the bill to legalise marijuana earlier this year, points out that were it taxed it could raise some $1.3 billion a year for state coffers, based on a $50 per ounce levy on sales. As an added benefit to the public purse, lots of police time and prison space would be freed up. California’s jails heave with 170,000 inmates, almost a fifth of them inside for drug-related crimes, albeit mostly worse than just possessing a spliff. [/SIZE][/FONT]

    [FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif][SIZE=-1]In Europe, the authorities face similar pressures: the difficulty of enforcement, and bursting courts and prisons. So the tough sentences recommended in the laws of many European countries are seldom handed out. London’s police chief said last week that law-breakers of all kinds were escaping with cautions or on-the-spot fines, because of pressure on the courts.[/SIZE][/FONT]

    ...

    [FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif][SIZE=-1]Decriminalising personal possession, though helpful in other ways, won’t do much to tackle organised crime, which retains its grip on the market. But America’s tentative moves in the direction of legalising the supply of drugs, rather than just going easy on users, could start to change things. Sanho Tree, of the Institute for Policy Studies, an American think-tank, notes that Mexico’s cartels are thought to get about 70% of their income from sending marijuana north. The higher the legal production, the harder that will be.[/SIZE][/FONT]

    [FONT=verdana,geneva,arial,sans serif][SIZE=-1]If California’s hippies long for legalisation, the bullet-weary citizens of Mexico’s poorest barrios are even keener.[/SIZE][/FONT]

    - more at www.economist.com/world/international/displaystory.cfm?story_id=14845095
     
  2. Paul3144

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    I'm all for legalizing pot. We could free up so much resources and put a damper on drug cartels.
     
  3. Mexdeaf

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    Then we'd have to legalize heroin, cocaine, crystal meth... and every new drug that comes down the pike.

    Then the jails would be filled with people who drove under the influence, etc....
     
  4. StefanM

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    We wouldn't "have to" legalize anything. Arguably, marijuana is no more harmful than alcohol, but alcohol is openly and legally available. We've not "had to" legalize marijuana.
     
  5. twpaige

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    Though I'm obviously against any type of legalization of cannibus, I have to wonder if those in the 'In Moderation' thread would feel that smoking a doobie could possibly cause anyone to stumble or be considered a sin if and when it becomes legal.
     
  6. Bro. Curtis

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    Well, they're gonna need those empty cells to throw those of us who refuse to buy health insurance into.....
     
  7. Revmitchell

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    Then there would be endless threads about whether or not it is ok to smoke marijuana in moderation. And some "christians" would argue yes of course.
     
  8. Robert Snow

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    We Christians always discuss every issue, which is good actually. I would not be in favor of a person smoking marijuana as a rule, unless it was medically. I'm not talking about smoking it for every supposed medical reason under the sun. I'm talking about a person who smokes to alleviate nausea because of chemotherapy or something like that. Generally, if you don't actually need it, leave it alone.
     
  9. Bro. Curtis

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    Genesis 1:30 And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given every green herb for meat: and it was so.

    Genesis 9:3 Every moving thing that liveth shall be meat for you; even as the green herb have I given you all things.


    I'm usually with Mitch, 95%, but God put marijuana here for SOME reason. I know, first hand, that smoking even just a little bit puts an instant stop to the nausea caused by chemotherapy & radiation cancer treatments. I am not saying it's OK for casual use, and I am not denying the destructive power it has for those who choose to live that way. I am saying, after the garden, that there is no plant man is forbidden to use.
     
  10. Revmitchell

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    Well if you can find a use for it and can remain sober then by all means use away.But the minute you get high you are going against scripture. Should we use it for medical purposes? Well plenty of drugs for medical purposes get us high. And they often alleviate nausea or pain. Marijuana is no different than anything else in that respect. But to make it legal just to "supposedly" get rid of drug cartels is absurd.

    But what will happen among Christians is libbies will claim a "freedom" in Christ to do it out of an abuse of "the Priesthood of the believer" and the "soul compentancy". Then they will start serving it in their churches, much like they do champagne at New Years, and every other excuse they will create out of their liberal heads.
     
  11. Bro. Curtis

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    I disagree. Jails should be used to house violent criminals, not pot smokers.

    These drug cartels mostly deal in cocaine & heroin, anyways.
     
  12. Revmitchell

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    Well it is a different story down here ins Florida. That junk gets air dropped on a regular basis from south of here.


    So what should be done with Madoff?
     
  13. Bro. Curtis

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    He should be put on a penal farm, to work off his debts.
     
  14. billwald

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    >Then we'd have to legalize heroin, cocaine, crystal meth... and every new drug that comes down the pike.

    "Slippery slope" arguments are not logical and usually don't happen when ignored.

    There is a BIG difference between house plants and stuff that requires dangerous chemicals for their manufacture. Anything that can be grown in one's living room as a house plant should be legal. You want to grow poison ivy? Fine with me but don't ask me over for coffee.
     
  15. Mexdeaf

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    It's not a "slippery slope" it's the "Second Law of Thermodynamics."
     
  16. billwald

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