Was MLK a born again Christian

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Revmitchell, Jan 21, 2009.

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  1. Revmitchell

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  2. Jim1999

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    From my personal experience, I must confess that I always had some serious doubt. He was forthright when talking about the Jesus experience, but on details he always came up with the liberal concept of Jesus and even God.

    His personal life is another question. I mean his activities in the motels between demonstrations. He liked his women. Even his wife was well aware of this fact.

    When others of us talked about the divine Jesus, he never stopped us nor tried to change us. Generally he would change the topic.

    Was he born again? I can't definitively say anything about that, but I seriously had my doubts based on my theology and his expressions back then in 1960.

    Just like Jesse Jackson, he used Christianity when it suited his task at hand.

    You must decide for yourself.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  3. BigBossman

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    I don't believe this, but I was reading some where years ago that Dr. Martin Luther King was a communist, but not a card carrying member. I can't remember where I read that, but I doubt it was true.
     
  4. Jim1999

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    In some circles in America communist is a label used for anyone who doesn't go along with the norm. Martin was never a communist. He did believe in what he was doing and was totally fixed to that. We didn't want anything more for Blacks; we wanted what was there for all Americans. Martin did not endorse violence. This is why the Christian Leadership split with the youth movement. Peaceful marches was the order of the day, even though they didn't start out so peaceful. I spent 3 days in jail and my only crime was walking down a street with a blackman. We weren't even protesting or carrying signs.

    I will stand behind Martin Luther King Jr as a man and the leader of what we wee doing, but personal life does leave some questions, if I am to be totally honest.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  5. rbell

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    I understand the nature of the question, and this is not a cop-out response:

    It's not my call to make.

    Thus, I wouldn't mention him in heaven in a prayer.
     
  6. blackbird

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    Unfortunately---though he didn't endorse it----violence did rear its ugly head---on(to be fair) both the black side and the white side---the bombing of the Birmingham church where those little girls were---in which, former Secretary of State Condy Rice was an aquaintance of those girls(she grew up in Birmingham) and was about the same age as those girls at the time----and the senseless riots---one of which I recall as a young boy in Baton Rouge--where a Television anchorman who was white(named Bob Jones, I believe) was beaten with bricks and clubs by black men---and he never recouperated from the head trauma

    What I'm trying to say, brother is, those "peaceful" marches you mentioned---------where you mention that they didn't start out peaceful----well---on the other end of the spectrum---some DID start out peaceful but ended up violent
     
    #6 blackbird, Jan 22, 2009
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  7. Martin Luther

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  8. Tom Bryant

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    When I was at Tennessee Temple, Dr. Roberson once said that he had spoken with him at least once and thought that he had trusted Christ as Savior.

    In terms of his adultery, Lot was guilty of incest but Jude says that he had a righteous soul. On the other side, no one ever suspected Judas of being the son of perdition.
     
  9. Martin Luther

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    [post snipped]
     
    #9 Martin Luther, Jan 22, 2009
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  10. Revmitchell

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    [question snipped]
     
    #10 Revmitchell, Jan 22, 2009
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  11. rbell

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    [question snipped]
     
    #11 rbell, Jan 22, 2009
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  12. saturneptune

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    Some of the posts are unbelievable. Most of you were not even alive or remember when MLK during the civil rights years. Aside from that, you have no idea if any of the allegations are true or not, not a clue.

    But worst of all, especially those of you who are called to the ministry, who are you to say someone is saved or not? Again, you do not have a clue. It is amazing to me those who think they have the insight and mind of God to make such determinations. That is a cute trick. You should take it on the road.

    I did not like a lot of King's ways, and at the time, his ideas. He was not perfect, but he helped a lot of people in the long run.

    If I fixed machines at work the way some of you present theology on this board, I would be fired within the week.

    By the way, I voted for Nixon, Reagan twice, and Bush twice, Dole, and almost did not vote for McCain because he was too liberal in my eyes.
     
  13. pinoybaptist

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    [quotation of deleted post snipped]

    This is a racist statement, and I resent it. There are blacks that deserve the N word, just as there are whites and browns that do the same, but to sweepingly say "as a people" ?
    My wife went to a Black church before I came to this country, and I could not even begin to describe the love they had for her and the love they showed each other and to others.
    I have known non-church going blacks who had a sense of decency that would shame some non-black "Christians" I have met both here and in my old country.

    Your statement rings equal with the thinking that blacks don't need no education, just direction.
     
    #13 pinoybaptist, Jan 22, 2009
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  14. saturneptune

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    Thank you. Could not have said it better myself.
     
  15. Jim1999

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    My role in the Civil Rights Movement n 1960 was to encourage and assist Blacks to register for the vote they had. That was a job in itself because Blacks feared for their lives just go and register.

    Yes, there were pockets of violent Blacks too, but not in our movement. I already pointed out that the two groups were separated. King always believed in peaceful means and he would not tolerate even talk of violence.

    The Blacks never sicked dogs on people, nor rode horses over them, or used batons to beat them. We just marched as a witness. I will say this, the White mobs did not discriminate; they hit me too!

    On one occasion, our motel was fired upon. We had to hit the floor. Our FBI agent advised us to pack up the car and leave. Back then the roads were all clay and one could see a car coming down road for miles. We stayed in motel and left early in morning at first light. We learned later that that FBI agent, who was supposed to protect us, was connected with the White movement. He was eventually fired and replaced.

    On being different now, yes, there are extremes even to-day on both sides. A lot of those extremes were in the North; Southside Chicago, NY City, Philadelphia and a few others.

    In the South, in Alabama, we witnessed a young Black lad drowned by some White youths because he dared to use a White washroom. He was drowned in the toilet and left on the floor. We sat in a car parked across from the station and didn't dare to get out of car; two White blokes and a Black man. When the sherrif arrived, he simply told the lad's brother to go get his daddy cos the boy had an accident and he's dead! No press, no fuss, end of story. We had to speed out of that town with the Blackman holdng his head down below the car windows.

    In our motel we could only have the White workers. Blacks were not permitted.

    Some say the Blacks have never learned a more peaceful way. Well, have you ever seen a White man tied to a tree and whipped within a breath of life because he was White?

    I asked a Black man in the 80's in Georgia what the difference was to-day. He responded, "I no longer haf' to hold a door for a White woman. I do it because I want to, and I don't even haf' to bow my head.

    Yes there are some Black attitudes to-day and I regret those. There are still some White attitudes too. They just don't show up in the ghettos they don't live in.

    When I went to the Bible Club Movement caps, they were still segregatd. The White cap just north of Philly and the Black camp in the Pokonos,,,,,,,,but they were still segregated under a fundamental Christian organization. The missionaries who worked the camps were not segregationists, but those were the political conditions they still had to work under in the mid sixties.

    This was not even 100 years after the Civil War and we were still fighting for freedom. The freedom all Americans hold so precious at least in their speeches. We still have a long ways to go on both sides. Hopefully one day we won't have sides.

    This is what Martin Luther King Jr marched for. Yes, he incorporated Christian thought, words and ideas, but this was a vehicle to get his message across and gain support for rights, rights for all.

    This is just a small part of my thoughts. One bloke who was there and felt the pain of stones, dogs, batons and even jail from which I have a Presidential pardon which allows me to enter the USA freely.

    God bless America and may peace always prevail. I say this sincerely and mean it.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  16. saturneptune

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    That was one of the best posts I have seen in years. There is a lot of experience and wisdom there. You are a refreshing poster on this subject in contrast to the simple minds expressed here.
     
  17. Andy T.

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    Can a person be saved while denying the bodily resurrection of Jesus?
     
  18. PeterM

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    If it goes beyond the bounds to question a fellow member's salvation, why is it acceptable to have a full blown discussion about MLK's (or anyone elses, dead or alive) salvation.

    Only the Lord knows our hearts and whether our names are ultimately written in the Lamb's Book of Life. I can see no good coming from this discussion.
     
  19. ccrobinson

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    [question snipped]
     
    #19 ccrobinson, Jan 22, 2009
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  20. Dr. Bob

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    Agreed. For those who hear very "tainted" stories, they immediately judge him "unsaved". He was very socialist and had numerous confirmed adulteries. He was attacked and hated by J Edgar et al so many of us in college in the 60's thought he was a really "bad" dude.

    But according to his own testimony, that of men like Dr Roberson, and his dear wife's wonderful book about their EARLY life and ministry (My Life with MLK) I would land on the side that would think he may have been truly born again.

    He was a doctrinal liberal. But he was a good pastor, a loving father, and of course an icon in the long struggle for equality.

    But committing adultery or questioning the virgin birth (not the deity of Christ, just the meaning of the virgin birth) does not mean a person is not saved.
     
    #20 Dr. Bob, Jan 22, 2009
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