What day of the week was the crucifiction?

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by deacon jd, Oct 9, 2006.

  1. deacon jd

    deacon jd
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    I would like to hear some thoughts on what day of the week the crucifiction took place on. I of course have already studied the subject and feel settled that it was a Thursday, but I would like to hear from others also. Please include scripture references in you reply. Thank You. God bless.
     
  2. Trotter

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    It ended with a "Y". :D
     
  3. webdog

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    This is a spring topic. Ask it again in 6 months. The topic now should be about how evil halloween is...followed by how Christians should not celebrate Christmas...follwed by the St. Patrick was / wasn't saved...THEN Easter :D
     
  4. EdSutton

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    Sinc I've already twice weighed in with fairly detailed multiple posts of why it was Thursday (hey deac- we agree on this one):thumbsup: , I shall refrain here. One who is really interested:thumbs:, as opposed to 'just askin'':sleep:, can find the posts by expanding the threads dating to at least a year, and I have been a member for only nine months.

    Ed
     
  5. rstrats

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    Luke 24:21 indicates that it couldn't have occurred any latter than Thursday.
     
  6. Hope of Glory

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    By the way we reckon time today, it was on a Wednesday. That's the only day that would permit him to be entombed for three days and three nights, and the only day that would fit all the requirements for Scripture.

    Here's a link that lays it out and shows why. You can download the pdf or mp3 from the web page: Easter Myths
     
  7. EdSutton

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    Short Answer: Wednesday is too early; Friday is too late, as we reckon time, for either to fit all of the Scripture concerned, including the 'Triumphal Entry', and the picture of the Lamb presented the tenth day, and sacrificed the 14th day of Nisan, "between the evenings". Ergo, 'Thursday' is the only day that fits all the data.

    Ed
     
  8. EdSutton

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    Hope, I have said this before. The Scripture does not say the 'Son of man will "be 'entombed' for three days and three nights"', as far as I can tell, unless you happen to know some other than found in the four more common gospels, or some extra-Biblical epistles somewhere. And Matthew does not say that. With all respect, toss the web page, and study what the Scripture actually says!

    Matt. 12 39-40 says (from memory, granted) "No sign shall be given but the sign of the prophet, Jonah. For as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so shall the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth."

    This says nothing about the myth of "exactly 72 hours", or when His body would be 'entombed", for He was not there 'right at' sundown, for after about the 'ninth hour', He was already gone, having dismissed His Spirit to the Father, to where? In Sheol, in Paradise, awaiting the thief to arrive, and preaching. He would then cross the "great gulf fixed" (no mere man could cross it, but He could) preach to the spirits in 'tataros', cross back and proceed to 'lead his captivity captive', in the resurrection.

    Ed
     
  9. Watchman

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    Wednesday. He arose Saturday at the going down of the sun (the start of the first day of the week. Exactly 3 days and three nights as He said. IMHO how else could it be?
     
  10. Rex77

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    The Jewish Inclusive Reckoning Rule
    Whenever the expression "day and night" or "night and day" appear together in the Hebrew Scriptures or in the New Testament the period can
    never be less than a full 24-hour day.
    *day and night
    never less than a full day (24 hours)
    *night and day
    never less than a full day (24 hours)


    *forty days and forty nights
    never less then 40 full days (40 full 24-hour days)
    *Three days" and three nights
    never less than 3 full days (3 24-hour days)
    *A day either a full day or a partial day deemed a full day
    *A night
    either a full day or a partial day deemed a full day
    *Forty days
    never less than 38 full days and 2 partial days nor more than 40 full days
    *The third day = never less than a part of 3 days and 2 nights nor more than 3 full days (3 24-hour days)
    *After three days = never less than 3 full days (3 24-hour days)

    The rule is unmistakable, whenever the expression "day and night" or "night and day" appear together in the Hebrew Scriptures the period is never less than a full 24-hour day.


    Now using this work it out.
    Unknown source
     
    #10 Rex77, Oct 9, 2006
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  11. Pipedude

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    According to the disciples on the road to Emmaus, Sunday was "the third day" since the crucifixion. Study the occurrances in the gospels of "the third day" and see just what they meant by that expression. Then count back from Sunday and you'll be of the same opinion as the disciples were.

    On the other hand, rather than actually read all those passages that use the expression, you could just make up your own meaning for "the third day" and go with that. This approach will save fifteen minutes and it will keep you from being like the Catholics, so don't reject it outright.

    There's a certain exhilaration that comes from overthrowing what scholars have taught for two millennia. It brightens up the day, makes you stand a little taller, puts a spring in your step, y'know, kind of like when you find a nickel on the sidewalk or hear that your IRS auditor went home to be with the Lord and they're closing your file.

    Have a go at it, chum.
     
  12. Hope of Glory

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    My sermons are based precisely on what Scriptures say, thank you very much. If you don't like the Scriptures I use, then ignore them.

    "Three days" can be any part of three days. "Three days" could technically be 26 hours.

    "Three days and three nights" are exactly that: Three days and three nights. 72 hours.

    Don't like it? Ignore it.
     
  13. EdSutton

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    "Unknown source"? Good term! I like it! :thumbsup:

    About on a par with "classified leaks" or "highly placed sources" in 'political speak', wouldn't you say? Only problem is - this is unsubstantiated from the get-go. One cannot question this mirage, for it's source is "unknown".

    How about "rumor mill" or "urban legend", today's current term?

    Unfortunately, that is about what this is. There is not a single Scripture reference or cite to back any of this up, and I believe that is what we are supposed to be discussing. And frankly, since I'm not very 'Politically Correct', this almost upon reading it, seems to be designed sub-silento for the specific purpose of a 'drive-by' shot of defending a 'Wednesday' crucifixion date.
    Rex77, this is neither to disparage your belief, nor even the accuracy of what you pasted, here, and certainly is not to question your intentions, but unfortunately a sieve will still not hold water. And this is nothing more than a sieve, albeit a fairly widepread one. Keep reading some of these posts. I am not one to toot my own horn, as a rule, but I have as I said, had some fairly detailed posts of this in the past. Some others have as well.

    And Pipedude has an excellent observation about the 'Emmaus Road' disciples, which alone is enough, if not to erase and bury, to at least bring a severe pause and 'hurt' to a "Wednesday" date. :tonofbricks:

    It has been posted elsewhere by another (and that on the BB) that:

    "A text out of context is a pretext to a proof text!"

    I agree! :thumbsup:

    As to apply the above to a couple of other posters -

    "Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, I give you Exhibit 'A'!"

    Ed
     
    #13 EdSutton, Oct 10, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 10, 2006
  14. Baptist in Richmond

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    Doesn't the Sabbath begin at sundown on Friday?

    Regards,
    BiR
     
  15. EdSutton

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    The regular weekly Sabbath does. Some of the other Sabbaths, such as the first day(s) of 'The Feast of Unleavened Bread', and 'The Feast of Trumpets' which also are/were "a Sabbath", for example, did not, but rather were "date specific" as opposed to 'day specific'. 'Unleavened

    All 'days' for the followers of Judaism began at sundown.

    Ed
     
    #15 EdSutton, Oct 10, 2006
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  16. LeBuick

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    Here is what we know for sure... He died just after this;

    Matthew 27:46 And about the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice, saying, Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani? that is to say, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? ...... 50 Jesus, when he had cried again with a loud voice, yielded up the ghost.

    He rose sometime just prior to this;

    Matthew 28:1 In the end of the sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre.

    So the questions is what do we make of this? We know the first day of the week is Sunday and it was as the sun began to break on the horizon (dawn). However, was this Sunday? It depends on when the sun came up that day. If before 6AM then it would have still be Saturday night or before the 1st hour of prayer. Irregardless, after midnight is Sunday in my book so he rose early Sunday Morning. This is what John said;

    John 20:1 1 The first day of the week cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulchre.

    Now he died just after 3pm. We know this as the 9th hour of the day. Scripture supports there was a day the lamb had to be slain prior to the passover to be sure no work was done on the sabbath. Did Christ die on that day?
     
  17. LeBuick

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    Ok, I found the time it was to be slain;

    Exodus 12:6 And ye shall keep it up until the fourteenth day of the same month: and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it in the evening.
     
  18. PeterM

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    I am waiting on baited breath to see how this one turns out...
     
  19. EdSutton

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    Generally, but IMO not exactly, there Rev. Al, -er I mean LeBuick. There are some longstanding, 'religious', 'colloquial expressions' used in the gospels, that are not found in the OT terminology, including 'Preparation', which had come to refer to what Leviticus expressly calls 'Passover'. This is 14 Nisan (or Abib), when the Passover lamb was sacrificed "between the evenings" (YLT, Darby) This day i.e. Passover, and the day that is known as "firstfruits" were spoken of as 'Feast Days', but were not termed as Sabbaths or 'Holy convocations' days. I also believe that one of the "Holy Convocations", specifically the first day of "the Feast of Unleavened Bread", or 15 Nisan is what is in view in John 19:31, where "that Sabbath was an High day", something that would not have been said of a usual weekly Sabbath.
    Matt 28:1 also tells us something in his terminology, as he writes for and to the Jews- "οψε δε σαββατων" or "At the close of the Sabbaths..."

    There was more than one Sabbath, that crucifixion week, namely The "high day" Sabbath of 15 Nisan, and the regular Sabbath that fell on 16 Nisan, that year. This incidentally "pushed back" 'Firstfruits' until 17 Nisan, for that year, for that is the only Feast Day that is not 'date specific' but rather is "on the morrow after the Sabbath" hence on the first of the week for that year, and was the 'Day' of Resurrection, when the Lord "led His captivity captive" from Sheol/Hades, and presented a wave of 'firstfruits' to the Father, and all "according to the Scripture". Hope that helps. G'nite all,

    Ed
     
    #19 EdSutton, Oct 11, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 11, 2006
  20. LeBuick

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    You are correct Brother Ed, I am Rev Al..

    Whoops! I mean I left my thought unfinished. But to pick up on where you left, we know the day he rose and we know he was killed on Nisan 14. All we need is a calander from the year of his death to see which day of the week Nisan 14 was and we'll have the exact answer. This is because Passover was on the 14th and not the sabbath...
     

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