What do these words mean?

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by Gwyneth, Feb 3, 2004.

  1. Gwyneth

    Gwyneth
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    What do these words mean ?
    Sacrament
    Ordinance
    When would they be used correctly ? I have heard the Lords supper called a sacrament, but think that it is rather an ordinance....... which is correct?

    Gwyneth
     
  2. Daniel David

    Daniel David
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    Sacrament is a term used primarily by catholics, presbyterians, episcopalians, anglicans, methodists, etc.

    It really refers to the idea that God dispenses his grace through the means of Communion and baptism (which for them is really usually sprinkling or pouring and thus not baptism at all).

    Baptists refer to the events as ordinances. We say the Lord's supper usually instead of communion (though we know what a person means if they say communion). They are nothing more than two ways to remember the Lord. No grace is dispensed through the events. They are a memorial.
     
  3. Ephesus23

    Ephesus23
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    I think it all depends on what church you ask. When I was Catholic, baptism and communion were two of the seven sacraments. Now that I'm Baptist, I as well as my church see them as ordinances- in other words, they aren't necessary for salvation, while Catholic churches will have you believe they are necessary.
     
  4. Dr. Bob

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    Our city has "ordinances" about parking, snow plowing, door to door sales. Simple rules and guidelines which must be followed.

    Benefit of following a rule, law, ordinance is that you don't get in trouble! It is negative in context.

    Churches that have "sacraments" are implying (from the word) that it is "sacred" - that one receives benefit from it.

    God's grace is given through the sacrament of baptism so you go to heaven (not!). Or through the eucharist (not!). But it is positive in context.

    So Baptists make a clear distinction - two separate entities of sacrament/ordinance. Most other religions make NO distinction - just two sides (positive and negative) of the same coin.
     
  5. Ed Edwards

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    SACRAMENT - that ceremony which confers saving grace

    ORDINANCE - a ceremony established
    by a higher authority (such as
    the church hierarchy)

    My pastor prefers this term:
    OBSERVANCE

    Baptists note two observances:
    Baptism and The Lord's Supper

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Bro. James Reed

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    Or three, depending on which Baptist group you are speaking of.

    Baptism, the Lord's Supper, and washing of the saints' feet

    We use the term ordinance as they were ordained(decreed, established, appointed, set up...take your pick) by Jesus, while he was here, that we should follow them as:

    Baptism: answer to a good conscience
    Lord's Supper: In remembrance of him
    Washing feet: In humble submission to our brethren

    Do they impart grace? No

    Do they make you feel very, very, very good? Absolutely!
     
  7. Russ Kelly

    Russ Kelly
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    The term, "sacrament," also involves a deeper theological argument between Roman Catholics and most Protestants. The definition of the word "justification" has had two very different approaches. Roman Catholics have wanted to define "justification" as "infused" righteousness. That is, when God looks at the believer, He sees the sacrafmentally infused righteousness of Christ (through the mass-wafer) INSIDE the believer and declares him righteous. On the other hand, most Protestants understand "justification" as that "imputed" or "reckoned" righteousnes which is a COVERING.
     

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