What Does Repent Mean?

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by InTheLight, Dec 29, 2015.

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When discussing its connection to salvation, what does repent mean?

  1. 1. Turn from your sins.

    1 vote(s)
    8.3%
  2. 2. Feel sorry for your sins.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. 3. Have a "change of mind" about Jesus.

    2 vote(s)
    16.7%
  4. 4. Feel sorry for your sins and turn from your sins.

    1 vote(s)
    8.3%
  5. 5. Feel sorry for your sins, resolve to quit sinning, and endeavor to live a more upright life.

    1 vote(s)
    8.3%
  6. 6. Other (explain)

    7 vote(s)
    58.3%
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  1. InTheLight

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    When discussing in the context of salvation, what does it mean to repent?
     
  2. Iconoclast

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    Here you go...for starters;
    Home / Bible Dictionaries / Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words
    Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words
    Repent, Repentance
    Resource Toolbox
    A — 1: μετανοέω
    (Strong's #3340 — Verb — metanoeo — met-an-o-eh'-o )
    lit., "to perceive afterwards" (meta, "after," implying "change," noeo, "to perceive;" nous, "the mind, the seat of moral reflection"), in contrast to pronoeo, "to perceive beforehand," hence signifies "to change one's mind or purpose," always, in the NT, involving a change for the better, an amendment, and always, except in Luke 17:3,4 , of "repentance" from sin. The word is found in the Synoptic Gospels (in Luke, nine times), in Acts five times, in the Apocalypse twelve times, eight in the messages to the churches, Revelation 2:5 (twice),16,21 (twice), RV, "she willeth not to repent" (2nd part); Revelation 3:3,19 (the only churches in those chapters which contain no exhortation in this respect are those at Smyrna and Philadelphia); elsewhere only in 2 Corinthians 12:21 . See also the general Note below.

    A — 2: μεταμέλομαι
    (Strong's #3338 — Verb — metamelomai — met-am-el'-lom-ahee )
    meta, as in No. 1, and melo, "to care for," is used in the Passive Voice with the Middle Voice sense, signifying "to regret, to repent oneself," Matthew 21:29 , RV, "repented himself;" Matthew 21:32 , RV, "ye did (not) repent yourselves" (AV, "ye repented not"); Matthew 27:3 , "repented himself" 2 Corinthians 7:8 (twice), RV, "regret" in each case; Hebrews 7:21 , where alone in the NT it is said (negatively) of God.

    B — 1: ἀμεταμέλητος
    (Strong's #278 — Adjective — ametameletos — am-et-am-el'-ay-tos )
    "not repented of, unregretted" (a, negative, and a verbal adjective of A, No. 2), signifies "without change of purpose;" it is said (a) of God in regard to his "gifts and calling," Romans 11:29; (b) of man, 2 Corinthians 7:10 , RV, "[repentance (metanoia, see C)] ... which bringeth no regret" (AV, "not to be repented of"); the difference between metanoia and metamelomai, illustrated here, is briefly expressed in the contrast between "repentance" and "regret."

    C — 1: μετάνοια
    (Strong's #3341 — Noun Feminine — metanoia — met-an'-oy-ah )
    "afterthought, change of mind, repentance," corresponds in meaning to A, No. 1, and is used of "repentance" from sin or evil, except in Hebrews 12:17 , where the word "repentance" seems to mean, not simply a change of Isaac's mind, but such a change as would reverse the effects of his own previous state of mind. Esau's birthright-bargain could not be recalled; it involved an irretrievable loss. As regards "repentance" from sin, (a) the requirement by God on man's part is set forth, e.g., in Matthew 3:8; Luke 3:8; Acts 20:21; 26:20; (b) the mercy of God in giving "repentance" or leading men to it is set forth, e.g., in Acts 5:31; 11:18; Romans 2:4; 2 Timothy 2:25 . The most authentic mss. omit the word in Matthew 9:13; Mark 2:17 , as in the RV.

    Note: In the OT, "repentance" with reference to sin is not so prominent as that change of mind or purpose, out of pity for those who have been affected by one's action, or in whom the results of the action have not fulfilled expectations, a "repentance" attributed both to God and to man, e.g., Genesis 6:6; Exodus 32:14 (that this does not imply anything contrary to God's immutability, but that the aspect of His mind is changed toward an object that has itself changed, see under RECONCILE). In the NT the subject chiefly has reference to "repentance" from sin, and this change of mind involves both a turning from sin and a turning to God. The parable of the Prodigal Son is an outstanding illustration of this. Christ began His ministry with a call to "repentance," Matthew 4:17 , but the call is addressed, not as in the OT to the nation, but to the individual. In the Gospel of John, as distinct from the Synoptic Gospels, referred to above, "repentance" is not mentioned, even in connection with John the Baptist's preaching; in John's Gospel and 1st Epistle the effects are stressed, e.g., in the new birth, and, generally, in the active turning from sin to God by the exercise of faith (John 3:3; 9:38; 1 John 1:9 ), as in the NT in general.
     
    #2 Iconoclast, Dec 29, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2015
  3. JamesL

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    Repent - Metanoeo
    meta = change
    noeo = to think

    Repent simply means "change the way you think"

    About what? That's determined by context. Repent is not a theological word, and it's not a behavior - no matter how much the works mongers want it to be.

    Repentance is something which happens in the mind. The way we think. But it's often argued it includes an element of "change of direction" or turning.

    That's very true, but the application is usually misplaced. The change in direction MUST relate to what you're turning from. The typical spiel of "turn from sin to trust Christ" is a perversion of the definition.

    If it's FROM sinning, then it must be TOWARD not sinning.

    If it's TOWARD faith in Christ, then it must be FROM not having faith in Christ.
     
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  4. robustheologian

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    Basically, repentance (metanoeó) is an internal change in character that results in an external change in conduct.
     
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  5. Deacon

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    The Greek word for "repent" or "repentance" describe an inward change of heart or attitude.

    As Robust Theologian noted, the inward change may be expressed outwardly but the expression is the result of repentance.

    Repentance in itself is not the outward expression, see Luke 3:8, "Produce fruit in keeping with repentance."

    Rob
     
    #5 Deacon, Dec 30, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2015
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  6. InTheLight

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  7. JonC

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    In terms of salvation, it is a change of mind - to have faith in a completely opposite direction.

    Repentance and belief are two aspects of faith in Christ. I say this because before we arrive at a faith in Christ we are not without faith at all. All men have faith, but it is the Object of that faith that matters. So believe in Christ means ceasing to believe in something else (i.e, repentance). Repentance looks back towards that which from which we have turned, belief looks forward to the object of our faith. So repent and believe are the active components of faith.
     
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  8. JamesL

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    I agree that it's an internal change first, but I'm not convinced that character is the internal element. I'm pretty certain that conviction is the internal element. It's not a theological word, and character starts to cross into that realm.

    I also don't see outward manifestations as inevitable. Most likely, but not inevitable.

    Suppose you wake up with pillow hair. You go look in the mirror and think it looks pretty cool all muffed up and going every direction. Maybe with a rooster on top. I've had that happen.

    So you look in the mirror another 8 times as you get dressed, and become firmly convinced that you have found a new hair style. That's conviction.

    Then you go to work and people make fun of your hair all day long. Maybe it's not easy to see what they see. A change in conviction is not easy. Maybe you resist. But after 15-20 times going to the bathroom to look in the mirror, you see it.

    Your thinking has been changed. Now all you see on your head is a ratted up mess. You've had a change of conviction. Repentance is finished.

    Now you have the responsibility to yourself, to act upon your change in thinking.

    Most people would go home, wash their hair, style it, and probably try to pretend that day never happened. What was I thinking?

    But what if you got offended that people made fun? You know they're right. You saw it in the bathroom. But maybe people have always looked at you as a trend setter.

    So your pride gets in the way of your clear conviction and you wear your hair that way for the next two months. The inner change is not expressed outwardly.

    Did repentance happen? Of course it did. Inside. But nobody saw it
     
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  9. Iconoclast

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    Yes.....It is not "only" a change of mind toward God.

    It is a total change of mind, will, emotions, it is God bringing the whole man, to the whole Christ.
    It is God supernaturally taking a rebel sinner and transforming him totally into a son with a new biblical worldview that drives him to diligently seek holiness and service to King Jesus based on His grace and mercy being extended to an unworthy sinner.Thumbsup
     
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  10. Iconoclast

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  11. Iconoclast

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    I do not think peters first sermon in Acts2 that he was concerned with bed head.
     
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  12. InTheLight

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    The bed head story is an analogy. Surely you know this.

    The sermon was about the Jews having a "change of mind" about the Messiah. About the fact that Jesus was the Son of God, was crucified, buried, and rose again. He was the promised Messiah. They needed to repent of their unbelief in Jesus as the Messiah and be baptized. I don't see any "feeling sorry for sins" in that sermon. Nor any "turn from your sins" admonishment.
     
  13. Revmitchell

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    The primary issue when talking about salvation is sin. Sin is the very thing that separates us from God (Isaiah 59:2). The price to be paid for our sin is death (eternal separation from God Romans 6:23). Sin is the very issue that sent Jesus to the cross (Colossians 2:14). It is the very reason grace is so necessary (Romans 5:21).

    When it comes time to share the gospel and to be saved we must know that we are sinners (Romans 3:23). We must know that Jesus shed his blood for our sin (Romans 3:25). God's wrath is because of sin (Ephesians 5:6). We will suffer the wrath of God without Jesus shed blood (Romans 1:18).

    Therefore:

    When dealing with salvation sin is the primary component to be dealt with (Ephesians 1:7). Sin must be turned from. Repentance was preached consistently in scripture. It always referred to turning away from sin. When they would get baptized they would confess their sins while doing so. Repentance always bears fruit (Luke 3:8). One cannot come to Jesus for the forgiveness of sins and yet say I will continue in sin. One cannot look to the punishment Christ received on the cross and say I have salvation but I will intend to continue to live in the very thing I am asking God for relief from. Repentance is always in the context of sin not simply belief. No case can be made for that scripturally.
     
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  14. InTheLight

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    It is never referred to as "turning from sin". Please show scripture that says this.

    There is no recording of people confessing their sins in the famous incidences of baptisms found in Acts 2, Acts 8, and Acts 16. This is found only in the baptisms of John the Baptist. John's baptism was for Jews, and was not done to be inducted into the church.

    True.

    Now look at what you wrote:

    "I have salvation but I will intend to continue to live in the very thing I am asking God for relief from."

    You see? Turning from your sins is a RESULT of salvation, not the instigator of it. Saved people should turn from their sins, indeed, must turn from their sins, with the help of the Holy Spirit.
     
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  15. JamesL

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    He
    Peter was also not concerned with unbelievers. Acts 2:5 tells us who he adressed - devout men.

    Eulabes - Strong's G2126
    Only 4 times this word was used in the N.T.

    Luke 2:25 - devout Simeon in the temple
    Acts 2:5 - devout mHews from every nation
    Acts 8:2 - devout men buried Stephen
    Acts 26:12 - devout Ananias (Paul recounts the laying on of hands by this brother)

    Remember that it had only been a few weeks since Jesus died. And that these men would have witnessed it, having been in Jerusalem for Passover, in keeping with Deuteronomy 16

    That's why Peter chided "This Christ, whom YOU crucified." (Verse 36)

    They were part of the crowd which cried out "crucify him" after laying palm branches before him less than a week earlier.

    These men believed in God prior to the cross and were justified. But they became duped by the religious leaders when they should have known better.

    Peter told them:
    1) repent - change your thinking about this man. He's the Messiah you have been hoping for.

    2) be baptized in His Name - public identity with Him. Not ashamed to let it be known they believe in Him

    3) for the remission of sin - what sin? Crucifying their own Messiah.

    4) you will receive the Holy Spirit. According to John 7:39 the Spirit had not yet been given, and would be given to those who believe in Christ.

    Why do you think Jesus said "seek first the kingdom of God" and to ask seek, knock? The promised Holy Spirit who would bring true righteousness
     
  16. Revmitchell

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    I just did. When they were baptized they were confessing sin. Please show where repentance is referred to as anything other than turning from sin.



    Ok but that does not change the definition of repentance our change how they understood it. I just used the baptism example to show how they understood it.



    What I said is not what you are making out to be. In fact it is the exact opposite.
     
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  17. agedman

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    There are those who do not look beyond "repentance" or better pre-repentance to the motivational factors of what and why the mind is changed.

    Certainly, one may have a conviction that they hold as what is right and proper, but the conviction itself is not what brings repentance nor a violation of that conviction a catalyst for repentance.

    There is a motivational factor that drives repentance.

    Of the worldly, the aspects of sorrow, regret, emotional pain, betrayal, commitment to another, and more, are all factors that impress one to change their mind.

    Of those who are believers, it is the implantation of the new nature and the impulses of the new will that brings Godly repentance. This is the single aspect of why repentance does not bring salvation but is the result of salvation. The "quickening" awareness cannot be restrained for that new birth will confess from a new heart and will.

    Certainly, there are aspects of the worldly that may also be impressed in the believer's life, but ultimately, that which is Godly repentance comes from God through the conduit of sanctification into some aspect of the believer's life, living, emotions, thinking, awareness, and other such which serves as the catalyst for a changed mind.

    This is what separates the typical "easy believe - repeat after me prayer for escape from hell" type from those who are repulsed by that type.

    A mistake is made, (imo), when one who strongly objects to "easy believe..." gospel and considers that salvation cannot occur in that view. This is judging the work of the Holy Spirit in another person's life, and that is not a judgment we are to make.

    Another mistake is from those who would place repentance as the catalyst of change. The authority of change is not repentance. Repentance is the indication of change that has already taken place within the core motivating factors.

    I am not now hungry, and I have no desire to eat. What changes my mind in the future that I desire to eat?
     
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  18. InTheLight

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    Precisely. They had already repented (changed their mind about Messiah). Now they were showing the world the outward evidence of an inward change by being baptized. They were confessing their sins, or "turning from their sins" BECAUSE they were saved, and not doing it to achieve salvation.


    Everywhere.
     
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  19. Revmitchell

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    ok well I want to avoid what is going on here and talking past one another. I will try to break it down to its smallest denominator one more time. The context of repentance (which is the crux of what we are talking about) is seen in events like the OT Baptism. Clearly that is how repentance was understood.

    The context of repentance being understood by them to be sin is the issue. By the way that context of repentance does not change at Jesus resurrection. It is always the same.




    Then it should be easy to show specifically.
     
  20. InTheLight

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    The literal definition of the word.

    metanoia: change of mind, repentance
    Original Word: μετάνοια, ας, ἡ
    Part of Speech: Noun, Feminine
    Transliteration: metanoia
    Phonetic Spelling: (met-an'-oy-ah)
    Short Definition: repentance, a change of mind
    Definition: repentance, a change of mind, change in the inner man.

    http://biblehub.com/greek/3341.htm
     
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