What is a Bible to Look Like?

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by PastorSBC1303, Mar 16, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. PastorSBC1303

    PastorSBC1303
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2003
    Messages:
    15,125
    Likes Received:
    0
    I asked this question in another thread that got closed and no one answered it.

    I would like to hear some answers.

    Thanks.
     
  2. John of Japan

    John of Japan
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Messages:
    12,212
    Likes Received:
    192
    Last year a Japanese salesman came to the door, and we got to talking. It turned out that he had read the NT in a modern Japanese version. He was a Buddhist, but respected the Bible. But he said that he was disappointed in the language of the version he read--it lacked dignity, he said.

    I believe this Buddhist made a valid point: the Bible is a book with dignity due to its very nature as the written Word of God. It ought not only to use good literary language in the translation, it should look dignified in keeping with its nature. So I have a problem with some of these editions that make it look like a silly magazine, such as Pastor_Bob showed on the other thread.
     
  3. Deacon

    Deacon
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2002
    Messages:
    6,970
    Likes Received:
    128
    Last year I visited the Smithsonian’s Freer Exhibit on bibles before the year 1000.
    Many bibles were displayed.

    Their covers ranged from cartoonish [Washington Manuscript III – 7th century]

    ...to lavishly garish, [Sion Treasure – mid 6th century]

    The bible was written for the people.
    It draws it’s dignity from it’s author and his message, not from any trappings with which we decorate it.

    Those that think otherwise are dangerously close to making the book an icon.

    Rob
     
  4. PastorSBC1303

    PastorSBC1303
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2003
    Messages:
    15,125
    Likes Received:
    0
    It lacked dignity because of the language. That is a different discussion IMO.

    What does a dignified book look like though? Does it have a black leather cover? Is it hard back? Does it have gold edged pages?

    IMO, the power and dignity of the Word come from the words inspired by the Holy Spirit as being living and active. Power and dignity do not come from the outward look.
     
  5. franklinmonroe

    franklinmonroe
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    2,872
    Likes Received:
    3
    'Bibles' come in all sorts of shapes and sizes; all kinds of materials. 'Bibles' can be plain, but many have been illustrated or elaborately decorated.

    Some 'Bibles' have 66 books, other 'Bibles' have more (ie. Ethiopian), some have less (ie. Samaritan). Some 'Bibles' have the books in different orders (ie. Tyndale's NT). I have a 'Bible' in chronological order, and another in topical order (Nave's).

    Due to the application of 'Bible' to a massive variety of content and media, the word is rendered meaningless unless the context is narrowly pre-defined.
     
  6. standingfirminChrist

    standingfirminChrist
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Messages:
    9,454
    Likes Received:
    0
    I can tell you a Bible isn't supposed to have the title "Hot Movies, Music, and Reads" on the cover.
     
  7. PastorSBC1303

    PastorSBC1303
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2003
    Messages:
    15,125
    Likes Received:
    0
    Where do you get this from?

    You got a list for me of what is acceptable on the cover and what isn't?
     
  8. standingfirminChrist

    standingfirminChrist
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Messages:
    9,454
    Likes Received:
    0
    God is Holy. He is not of the world. His Word is not of the world.

    If you think a Bible should have "Hot Movies" listed in it, you have a very shaded view of what God's Word is.
     
  9. TaterTot

    TaterTot
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    What about when people get their names imprinted on the front? THere is a page for that. I think this is wrong too, esp if having other words is. What's the point? :rolleyes:
     
  10. TCGreek

    TCGreek
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    Messages:
    7,373
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is good, Rob. :thumbs:
     
  11. Logos1560

    Logos1560
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2004
    Messages:
    3,127
    Likes Received:
    2
    Have there been any questionable symbols, illustrations or pictures, and other materials included in editions of the KJV?

    While there can be valid objections to what is included with the text of a translation by printers or publishers, the translators of that translation would not likely be responsible for those added symbols or materials.

    The 1611 KJV was officially a revision of the Bishops' Bible. The third edition of the Bishops' Bible published in 1572 [also called the second folio edition] is sometimes called "the Leda Bible" from "the decoration of the initial at the Epistle to the Hebrews which is a startling and incongruous wood-cut of Jupiter visiting Leda in the guise of a swan" (Cooper, Dictionary of Christianity, p. 29; Dore, Old Bibles, p. 252). Unger’s Bible Dictionary maintained that the Bishops’ Bible “was popularly called ‘the Leda Bible’” (p. 1114). MacGregor also confirmed that this edition’s wood-cut “used for the Epistle to the Hebrews represents the ancient Greek legend of Leda and the Swan” (Literary History, p. 154). Herbert observed that many of the initial letters in this Bishops' Bible "represent scenes from Ovid's Metamorphoses" (Historical Catalogue, p. 76). John Lewis noted that the 1572 edition of the Bishops' Bible included in the inner margin of the calender "the representations of the 12 signs of the Zodiac" (Complete History, p. 257).


    It may be that some of the initial letters in the original 1611 KJV edition with mythological scenes may be from the same source as those used in this Bishops’ Bible edition. For example, in the initial letter for Matthew 1 and Revelation 1, the 1611 KJV has an illustration with the Roman god Neptune with sea horses. At Psalm 141 and 1 Peter 3, the 1611’s initial letter has a figure of the Greek god Pan. At Romans 1, the 1611’s initial letter has a naked, sprouting nymph Daphne. These can be seen in the large 1611 digital reproduction by Greyden Press, but the 1611 reprints in Roman type published by Thomas Nelson or Hendrickson Publishers do not have them. Norton has a page of illustrations that includes the above three initials from the 1611 in his book, and he noted that it is unlikely that the KJV translators approved of their use (Textual History, pp. 51-52). Darlow and Moule confirmed that some of the ornamental initials in the 1611 resemble “those used in folio editions of the Bishops’ Bible” (Historical Catalogue, I, p. 135). In introductory articles in Hendrickson’s reprint of the 1611, Alfred Pollard pointed out: “In the New Testament two of the mythological ten-line set, the use of which in the Bishops’ Bible had justly been censured, reappear at the beginning of Matthew and Romans” (p. 45, footnote 2). At the bottom of the title page of the 1611 KJV, Geddes MacGregor observed that it has “a traditional symbol of the redeeming work of Christ, especially in the Eucharist--a pelican ‘vulning’ herself, that is, wounding herself with her beak to feed her young with her own blood” (Literary History, p. 205). Vance noted that “the engraved title page depicts the Trinity in the upper panel in the form of the Divine Name, a dove, and a lamb” (King James, His Bible, p. 55). The 1611 KJV edition referred to the signs of the Zodiac in its calendar: “Sol in Aquario” (p. xvii), “Sol in Piscibus” (p. xviii), “Sol in Aries” (p. xix), “Sol in Tauro” (p. xx), “Sol in Gemini” (p. xxi), etc.

    I have an Oxford edition of the KJV that has on its binding "Holy Bible with Masonic Helps" and that seems to have a Masonic symbol on the front cover. It is bound with an article entitled "The Holy Bible in Freemasonry" and with another article entitled "The legend of the craft." Its title page stated: The Holy Bible containing the Old and New Testaments according to the Authorized Version Together with special helps for the student of Masonry and that title page includes a symbol that is likely masonic.




     
  12. Ed Edwards

    Ed Edwards
    Expand Collapse
    <img src=/Ed.gif>

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2002
    Messages:
    15,715
    Likes Received:
    0
    A Bible should be Red

    A Bible should be read!

    -

    -
     
  13. Dale-c

    Dale-c
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,145
    Likes Received:
    0
    You posts often imply a bit of gnosticism.
     
  14. standingfirminChrist

    standingfirminChrist
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Messages:
    9,454
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you think I am gnostic because I believe God's Word is Holy and not of this world and to be revered, you are mistaken.

    I would say what your posts imply to me, but you don't care, so I won't bother.
     
  15. tinytim

    tinytim
    Expand Collapse
    <img src =/tim2.jpg>

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2003
    Messages:
    11,250
    Likes Received:
    0
    When you say, "not of this world", can you please elaborate?
     
  16. Pastor_Bob

    Pastor_Bob
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2002
    Messages:
    3,461
    Likes Received:
    45
    This is not the issue. The issue is how the Word of God is packaged. I would reject the magazine "bibles" even if they contained the KJV instead of the NCV. It is not a version issue; it is a marketing issue.
     
  17. standingfirminChrist

    standingfirminChrist
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Messages:
    9,454
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Word of God was written by men who were inspired by the Holy Spirit to pen those words so all could read and benefit from them.
     
  18. Linda64

    Linda64
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2004
    Messages:
    2,051
    Likes Received:
    0
    Do you need an illustration of what a Bible looks like?

    Here's one

    [​IMG]
     
  19. tinytim

    tinytim
    Expand Collapse
    <img src =/tim2.jpg>

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2003
    Messages:
    11,250
    Likes Received:
    0
    Really!!! I thought it looked like this...
    [​IMG]

    You should have told Jesus and Paul they were using the wrong kind of Bible...

    What about Bibles in Mp3 format...

    Or e-sword....

    Be careful to not worship a book instead of the author of the book...
     
  20. PastorSBC1303

    PastorSBC1303
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2003
    Messages:
    15,125
    Likes Received:
    0
    Are the verses of God's Word contained in a "magazine bible" living and active? Are they capable of leading someone to Christ?
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Loading...