What Is A Veteran?

Discussion in 'All Other Discussions' started by Salty, Feb 7, 2010.

  1. Salty

    Salty
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    What Is A Veteran?


    A "Veteran" -- whether active duty, discharged, retired, or reserve --
    is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to
    "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to,
    and also including his life."


    SFC Salty
    NYG Retired
     
  2. Jim1999

    Jim1999
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    I think we define a veteran differently in the UK and in Canada. He is a former military person of an active war, and not just a person who served in the military.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  3. Salty

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    In honor of Veterans Day (US) Remembrance Day (CAN), I am bumping this
     
  4. ktn4eg

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    If it weren't for our veterans, from Bunker Hill to Bahgram, we wouldn't be able to do what we do here on BB.
     
  5. Jon-Marc

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    In the US, anyone who served in the military is a veteran. I was in during the Viet Nam war but didn't go over there. So that means I'm not a veteran? Not all veterans fight in a war. Many serve in other necessary capacities. Saying they're not veterans just because they didn't fight in a war is disrespectful of all those who served their country faithfully but didn't fight in a war. Yes, we had civilians working with us at times who can't be called veterans unless they were actually in the military at some time.
     
  6. ktn4eg

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    See I Samuel 30:21-25 for an example of this concept.

    During the Vietnam Era, I evaded the draft. I enlisted in the US military! I served from 1964-69. I volunteered for Vietnam but was assigned to Germany instead.

    I didn't see any frontline combat. OTOH, during Israel's Six Day War [even though the US wasn't "officially" involved] we sure put in many long hours. Then when the Warsaw Pact decided to "liberate" Czechoslovakia, things were again very busy. This was only 150 miles from us with only one mountain range between us. Then when Libya decided to take over the US base that was in its country, things again were very "interesting."

    I love my country and was glad to serve her. No, the US isn't perfect by a long shot, but she is MY country! For those who live in other countries, I'd hope that you feel the same way about yours.

    Is your family perfect? I doubt it, but that shouldn't keep you from loving and serving them.

    Is your church perfect? I doubt it, but that shouldn't keep you from loving and serving her.

    'Nuff said.
     
  7. Salty

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    Maybe we didnt go to a combat zone, but we still wrote out the blank check.
     
  8. StefanM

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    All who served are veterans. Those who fought in a war are combat veterans.
     
  9. Jon-Marc

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    Exactly! I wasn't drafted; I enlisted before they could draft me. By that I was saying, "Here I am, use me where I'm needed." Apparently, I was needed on bases not in war zones, but I still consider myself a veteran. I may not be a veteran of a war, but I am a veteran of the military and was ready, able, and willing to do whatever my country wanted of me. I started out as a conscientious objector but soon changed that to "if my country needs me to fight, I am willing to do it." I had a cousin who was an Air Force enlistment sergeant, and I went to him to enlist. Like all those who do that job, he lied to me about how great it would be. :BangHead:

    Actually, I loved my job in the Air Force. It was the people over me that I couldn't stand--most of them anyway. Some of the supervisors were very nice, and I even had a civilian supervisor once. I regret not making the Air Force a career since the people I worked for as a civilian (and many I worked with) weren't any better than what I had to contend with in the Air Force--even worse
     
    #9 Jon-Marc, Nov 8, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2010
  10. Tom Bryant

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    Agreed! Once you joined you had very little control over where they sent you.
     
  11. SolaSaint

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    There are many who serve and never see combat or go overseas, but are still veterans. Their roles although not on the front lines can be as important. I'm sure the grunt loves the fact that he has fellow soldiers ensuring his weapons systems are working properly, and that someone is cooking a g.good meal for him/her. Even the guy/gal who ensures his finances are in order and keeps his records in order help to make our military forces the best in the world. Their all heros in my eyes.
     
  12. Salty

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    Until its time to re-up, than you can request a specific unit or location and if available, you can be guaranteed that unit.
     
  13. Melanie

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    I think Australia's definition is for those on active duty or at least policing in areas where the life is at risk. Australia has a fantastic Veterans infrastructure, much much better than Britain, and New Zealand (I think).
    When Dad was diagnosed with lung cancer his WHITE card was upgraded to the GOLD card because he had been issued with smokes at one point in his career. Dad thought it crazy because no-one tied him down and forced him to smoke. My mother has the card as a veteran's relict...giving her premium services in health and home cares.

    I know an uncle of mine who served in Japan during the occupation was exposed to radiation fallout and was one of many who had decades of wrangling with the Government for recognition of their service before gaining any benefits.
     
    #13 Melanie, Nov 8, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2010
  14. billwald

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    or who got drafted.
     
  15. Salty

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    but you still "enlist" but draftees were known as "US", and volunteers were know as "RA"
     
  16. ktn4eg

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    Did that make them all SBC? :smilewinkgrin:
     

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