What is an "African American"?

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by Joseph_Botwinick, Jan 22, 2004.

  1. Joseph_Botwinick

    Joseph_Botwinick
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    Is it somebody who is from Africa who is now an American, regardless of their skin color? Or, is it just another example of the racist left's attempt to divide our nation? Take a look at this article and how racist some schools can really be:

    http://www.cnn.com/2004/EDUCATION/01/22/king.controversy.ap/index.html

    The kid is from South Africa. The kid is American. He is an African American. But, because he is white, and not black, he is not only not eligible for this "Afircan American" award, he is disciplined for campaigning for it. How racist. I am thinking maybe the ACLU ought to get into this one. What do you think?

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  2. Precepts

    Precepts
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    "Tylena Martin, a junior, said the poster had been on the door to her homeroom class where she is the only black student. She said she felt hurt by the posters and the backlash that ensued.

    According to 2002-2003 state statistics, 56 Of Westside's 1,632 students are black."

    Either the award ought to be given to students with the title being "MLK-Americans" or the ACLU needs to start bussing in more blacks to the school. :rolleyes:


    Anyway, I'd vote for the white guy next year simply because it would agrevate the "MLK" racists! (And they call me a racist!) Only way the school could be fair is to let the ratio of blacks voting for their choice to be equal to whites voting for their choice.

    That way it would take 29.14 white votes to equal 1 black vote. But equality isn't the agenda of the "MLK" racists now is it? They demand equality on thier behalf, but don't you dare let a white man into their "black" privileges. :eek: :rolleyes:
     
  3. Shiloh

    Shiloh
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    What do you think? Me thinks you don't have enough to do!
     
  4. Joseph_Botwinick

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    Shiloh,

    Does it not bother you that an "African-American" was rejected for an "African-American" award simply because he was white? Not only that, he was suspended from school for even campaigning for it? Or, are you a liberal racist also?

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  5. USN2Pulpit

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    Since you asked, I'm an African-American. Having been born in Morocco, I became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1980.

    Oh yeah, I'm also caucasian, but I make no distinctions when it comes to mere skin color. And I certainly don't enter contests that are obviously designed for black Americans. Anyone with any common sense knows that the term "African American" is referring to ethnic heritage.

    Why do things simply to stir up trouble?
     
  6. Jim1999

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    Perhaps these type of awards are in and of themselves divisive and should not be allowed.

    The point is well taken, that the white from South Africa and in America is technically an African-American, as I would be an English-American if I chose to become American...I mean England English.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  7. Joseph_Botwinick

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    Jim,

    You do know that we defeated the Red Coats, don't you? You would be English American... ;) :D

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  8. Joseph_Botwinick

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    I have got to agree with you here, Jim. It is divisive. It is racist. But, it is typical of liberalism in America.

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  9. Jim1999

    Jim1999
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    Yes, Joseph, but you do know that the Red Coats were really only the Militia and poorly trained at that. The real British Army was busy with the French.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  10. Joseph_Botwinick

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    The French? You guys had trouble with the French? Perhaps you should have sent the real army to fight the colonist and the fake army to fight the French. No wonder you guys lost the war... ;) [​IMG] ;)

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  11. Johnv

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    It's primarily used to describe a person whose roots are from Central Africa, generally. Central Africans are black. Not everyone from Africa is an African American, and not everyone who's black is African American. For example, Jamaicans and Haitians who are American are Jamaican American and Haitian American.

    The problem is that many use the term to refer to race, but it's not a race identifier (Just ask a Jamaican or Haitian). This is one of the reasons that using the term as a race identifier is falling out of favor. My back friends identify themselves as black. They don't refer to themselves as African American. It seems it's the white folks who use that term the most.
     
  12. Johnv

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    Well, of your'e French Canadian, and you became a resident of the U.S., you'd be Canadian American. Interestingly, in Canada, a typical black person with African roots is called an African Canadian. So saith my family in Alberta [​IMG]
     
  13. Joseph_Botwinick

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    It's primarily used to describe a person whose roots are from Central Africa, generally. Central Africans are black. Not everyone from Africa is an African American, and not everyone who's black is African American. For example, Jamaicans and Haitians who are American are Jamaican American and Haitian American.

    The problem is that many use the term to refer to race, but it's not a race identifier (Just ask a Jamaican or Haitian). This is one of the reasons that using the term as a race identifier is falling out of favor. My back friends identify themselves as black. They don't refer to themselves as African American. It seems it's the white folks who use that term the most.
    </font>[/QUOTE]John.

    You make some good points here. I would also note that this is a school with a vast majority of white students in it. No wonder they still use African American when most blacks refer to each other as blacks. They are probably afraid of offending someone and getting sued for being "insensitive".

    BTW, what would a South African person in America be called, a South African American? See how divisive and racist this really is? Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton must be laughing their rear ends off that they are able to keep us so divided for so long after the end of slavery and segregation. They have convinced us so well to segregate ourselves and divide ourselves by labeling each group in such a way. And as a group, we have been duped into thinking as a group. How many times have you heard, "The majority of African Americans think..."? Nobody is allowed to think as an individual in today's society. Ok, enough of that rabbit chase.

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  14. Jim1999

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    The fact is, in Canada, every citizen is called a Canadian and a hyphenated name is unacceptable and has been since Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, passed the Canadian Bill of Rights.

    This is not to say that some people insist on hyphenating names. Many French-Canadienes still do it and the rest of Canada to them are Anglo-Canadians, even those coming from other countries.

    Every crime involving a Black person in Toronto is a Jamaican, even when they come from some other island or country..We love to lump people all into one...seems to be the nature of the beast. I have never heard nor seen the term African-Canadian used in Canada, either on the streets or in the newspapers.

    I am Canadian, and I have the papers to prove it. I just happen to come from England.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  15. Johnv

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    I work with a South African woman. Yes, she's South African American. We've joked about it before. But a South African American can be either white or black, since it referrs to national origin. She's aware of the fact that ethnically, she's European.

    She's got a realy cool accent, though.

    Seriously, I don't think such terms need to divide. They typically identify. It is us, rather, who tend to divide people based on identity. Heck, there are some folks that will divide non-Baptist Christians from Baptist Christians. Sad, don't ya think?
     
  16. Roy

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    I personally wouldn't want to offend anyone of another race by sponsoring something like an outstanding Caucasoid award. It baffles me how someone of another race could feel comfortable strutting his skin color in such a way.

    Roy
     
  17. HeDied4U

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    Maybe I'm being overly simplistic, but it really cracks me up when someone uses the term 'African American' or 'French-American' or any other '???-American' to describe themselves, when their family has been in this country for many generations.

    To my way of thinking, if you were born in this country, you are an American plain and simple. No hyphens are needed. Yes, I think it's wonderful that you want to recognize your heritage, and there's nothing wrong with that, just remember that you're an American first and foremost.

    God Bless!!!

    Adam [​IMG]
     
  18. Jimmy C

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    I will call someone of another race what ever they choose to be called. It does not upset me to call someone either Black or African American, and JOseph if you want to be called English American, or American or Liberal conservative fundamentalist moderate Baptist American that is how I will refer to you.

    Out of respect to my African American friends I will call them African American, if they tell me that they would rather me refer to them as Black I will do so. Typically I refer to them as simply my friends and leave race out of it all together.
     
  19. Johnv

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    I'm a naturalized citizen, hence, I wasn't born here. So what am I? [​IMG]
     
  20. SaggyWoman

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    I am a Filipino American, and wish I had an Imelda Marcos Day, (a national holiday) where I can take off from work with pay to go and buy shoes.

    Instead, I shake my African American Instruments on MLK day, I shake my maracas and wear my sombrero on Cinco de Mayo, I drink beer on St. Patrick's Day, and look forward to a multicultural Christmas.
     

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