What is "Baptist Theology" and how does it differ from other denominational theology?

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by CubeX, Mar 26, 2005.

  1. CubeX

    CubeX
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    I believe the topic itself is explanitory. I just want to know exactly what is "Baptist theology" and how it is different from other Christian theologies.

    Thanks!
    -David
     
  2. Stephen Mills

    Stephen Mills
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    We dunk, they don't.
     
  3. rsr

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    Immersion is no longer a big difference and never was the real dividing factor. (Early 17th century Baptists sprinkled.) Immersion is recognized by practically all groups as valid. It is practiced, more or less, by the Orthodox, Pentecostals, Churches of Christ, Disciples of Christ, and many others.

    Theology has not been the hallmark of Baptists. We have shared our soteriology with Calvinists and Arminians. We have upheld the Bible as the word of God. We have been orthodox in our understanding of the Trinity. (Those who didn't got siphoned off into Unitarianism, Universalism and other movements.)

    Historically, Baptists have been distinctive on church polity — the autonomy of the local church (although others have adopted that view as well) — and in the belief in soul liberty, the priesthood of the believer and religious freedom. This is commonplace now in the U.S., but it was a novelty in the 17th century.
     
  4. Bro. James

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    "Baptist Theology" is a misnomer--like "Baptist Church" is likewise. They exist only in the book of "religious generalities".

    There are "Real Baptists" who trace their faith and practice to Jesus calling out His Assembly on the shores of Galilee. They are the ones who are not "protestants", and staunchly deny any connection with Rome or the daughters of Rome. They are independent, sovereign, and answer to no synod, scepter, board or see. They are not a denomination.

    "Real Baptists have always "immersed", like John--The Baptist, the disciples of Jesus, and most everyone else who does not regard "baptism" as a sacrament. While usually only a remnant, "real Baptists" have maintained Jude 3, by the grace of God, in every generation--many have been martyred.

    Then there are the "pseudo" or "nominal" Baptists. They never were "real Baptists". Beware: the wolves dressed like sheep.

    Do not look for a name--look for a faith and practice with a near 2,000 year history.

    Selah,

    Bro. James
     
  5. rsr

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    So ... English Baptists circa 1620 weren't real Baptists?
     
  6. Bro. James

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    "Real Baptists" that is "New Testament Assemblies" have been in the British Isles for many centuries including the 17th. I correspond with some of them regularly--reckon they must still be there--until Jesus returns. They be looking for His return too.

    Selah,

    Bro. James
     
  7. mioque

    mioque
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    "There are "Real Baptists" who trace their faith and practice to Jesus calling out His Assembly on the shores of Galilee. They are the ones who are not "protestants", and staunchly deny any connection with Rome or the daughters of Rome. They are independent, sovereign, and answer to no synod, scepter, board or see. They are not a denomination."
    "
    ...and they only exist in your fevered imagination. [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  8. Pistos

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    Aren't we are called 'Baptist' because of our practice of faith? We baptize those who believes and trusts the Lord Jesus Christ as their Lord and Personal Savior? At first we did not give this name to us but those people who mocked our practise.

    Just like in the Book of Acts, they were called Christians first in Antioch. As they defined 'Christians' as people who follow the teachings and doctrine of a dead man-Jesus.

    So being identified with the teaching of Christ, early Baptists adopt the name Baptist for this reason.

    John the Baptist was called 'The Baptist' not by his own choosing but God's. So we are.

    Real or Not... by thy fruits ye shall know them. Which is which, they are not listening to our talk but looking at our walk.
     
  9. CubeX

    CubeX
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    Please explain and quote Scripture about this statement. Thank-you
    -David
     
  10. carlaimpinge

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    The Jews who followed John were not Baptists. They were Nazarenes, a sect of the Jews, who followed Jesus Christ. That is what the rulers at Jerusalem called them. (Acts 24, 28) I never met a Baptist in my life (and you haven't either) who BELIEVED in going to the temple.

    We are Christians. (Acts 11) That term came AFTER Pauline revelation and teaching at ANTIOCH, not Jerualem.

    Real Baptists IMMERSE, but so do Nazarenes and Christians, which are the BIBLICAL names for believers.

    John was certainly the FIRST BAPTIST, due to the fact that he didn't PRACTICE the manner of purifying as did the OTHER JEWS. (John 1-3) They sprinkled, but he PUT THEM IN THE WATER.
     
  11. Pistos

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    Please explain and quote Scripture about this statement. Thank-you
    -David
    </font>[/QUOTE]Here in Matthew 3:1 In those days came John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea, wrote by Matthew an Apostle of Christ. He wrote this as being led by the Holy Spirit of God as stated in 2 Peter 1:21. So did John addressed himself 'The Baptist'? No. But by faithful men of God moved by the Holy Ghost as they addressed him.

    In Matthew 14:2, King Herod's servants acknowledged John's practise of faith 'The Baptist'. These people were unbelievers and they know John not by words but by his deeds.

    Lastly, in Luke 7:28 For I say unto you, Among those that are born of women there is not a greater prophet than John the Baptist: but he that is least in the kingdom of God is greater than he. Here the Lord Jesus Christ speaking to them, commending his cousin in the flesh not as his kin but a servant of God. A great prophet and called him 'John the Baptist'.

    Hope this help... [​IMG]
     
  12. Bro. James

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    More hallucinations from a "fevered imagination"-

    Let us imagine: What makes "baptism" sacramental or not? Corollary: Is there anything regenerative regarding "baptism"?
     
  13. OldRegular

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    When the original charter of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary was adopted in 1858 it contained the following statement which continues as a part of the "fundamental laws." "Every professor of the institution shall be a member of a regular Baptist Church; and all persons accepting professorships in this Seminary shall be considered, by such acceptance, as engaging to teach in accordance with, and not contrary to, the Abstract of Principles hereinafter laid down, a departure from which principles on his part shall be grounds for his resignation or removal by the Trustees."

    The Abstract Of Principles

    I. The Scriptures.
    The Scriptures of the Old and New Testament were given by inspiration of God, and are the only sufficient, certain and authoritative rule of all saving knowledge, faith and obedience.

    II. God.
    There is but one God, the Maker, Preserver and Ruler of all things, having in and of himself, all perfections, and being infinite in them all; and to Him all creatures owe the highest love, reverence and obedience.

    III. The Trinity.
    God is revealed to us as Father, Son and Holy Spirit each with distinct personal attributes, but without division of nature, essence or being.

    IV. Providence.
    God from eternity, decrees or permits all things that come to pass, and perpetually upholds, directs and governs all creatures and all events; yet so as not to destroy the free will and responsibility of intelligent creatures.

    V. Election.
    Election is God's eternal choice of some persons unto everlasting life -- not because of foreseen merit in them, but of his mere mercy in Christ -- in consequence of which choice they are called, justified and glorified.

    VI. The Fall of Man.
    God originally created man in His own image, and free from sin; but, through the temptation of Satan, he transgressed the command of God, and fell from his original holiness and righteousness; whereby his posterity inherit a nature corrupt and wholly opposed to God and His law, are under condemnation, and as soon as they are capable of moral action, become actual transgressors.

    VII. The Mediator.
    Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God, is the divinely appointed mediator between God and man. Having taken upon Himself human nature, yet without sin, He perfectly fulfilled the Law, suffered and died upon the cross for the salvation of sinners. He was buried, and rose again the third day, and ascended to His Father, at whose hand He ever liveth to make intercession for His people. He is the only Mediator, the Prophet, Priest and King of the Church, and Sovereign of the Universe.

    VIII. Regeneration.
    Regeneration is a change of heart, wrought by the Holy Spirit, who quickeneth the dead in trespasses and sins enlightening their minds spiritually and savingly to understand the Word of God, and renewing their whole nature, so that they love and practice holiness. It is a work of God's free and special grace alone.

    IX. Repentance.
    Repentance is an evangelical grace, wherein a person being, by the Holy Spirit, made sensible of the manifold evil of his sin, humbleth himself for it, with godly sorrow, detestation of it, and self-abhorrence, with a purpose and endeavor to walk before God so as to please Him in all things.

    X. Faith.
    Saving faith is the belief, on God's authority, of whatsoever is revealed in His Word concerning Christ; accepting and resting upon Him alone for justification and eternal life. It is wrought in the heart by the Holy Spirit, and is accompanied by all other saving graces, and leads to a life of holiness.

    XI. Justification.
    Justification is God's gracious and full acquittal of sinners, who believe in Christ, from all sin, through the satisfaction that Christ has made; not for anything wrought in them or done by them; but on account of the obedience and satisfaction of Christ, they receiving and resting on Him and His righteousness by faith.

    XII. Sanctification.
    Those who have been regenerated are also sanctified, by God's word and Spirit dwelling in them. This sanctification is progressive through the supply of Divine strength, which all saints seek to obtain, pressing after a heavenly life in cordial obedience to all Christ's commands.

    XIII. Perseverance of the Saints.
    Those whom God hath accepted in the Beloved, and sanctified by His Spirit, will never totally nor finally fall away from the state of grace, but shall certainly persevere to the end; and though they may fall, through neglect and temptation, into sin, whereby they grieve the Spirit, impair their graces and comforts, bring reproach on the Church, and temporal judgments on themselves, yet they shall be renewed again unto repentance, and be kept by the power of God through faith unto salvation.

    XIV. The Church.
    The Lord Jesus is the Head of the Church, which is composed of all his true disciples, and in Him is invested supremely all power for its government. According to his commandment, Christians are to associate themselves into particular societies or churches; and to each of these churches he hath given needful authority for administering that order, discipline and worship which he hath appointed. The regular officers of a Church are Bishops, or Elders, and Deacons.

    XV. Baptism.
    Baptism is an ordinance of the Lord Jesus, obligatory upon every believer, wherein he is immersed in water in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, as a sign of his fellowship with the death and resurrection of Christ, of remission of sins, and of his giving himself up to God, to live and walk in newness of life. It is prerequisite to church fellowship, and to participation in the Lord's Supper.

    XVI. The Lord's Supper.
    The Lord's Supper is an ordinance of Jesus Christ, to be administered with the elements of bread and wine, and to be observed by his churches till the end of the world. It is in no sense a sacrifice, but is designed to commemorate his death, to confirm the faith and other graces of Christians, and to be a bond, pledge and renewal of their communion with him, and of their church fellowship.

    XVII. The Lord's Day.
    The Lord's Day is a Christian institution for regular observance, and should be employed in exercises of worship and spiritual devotion, both public and private, resting from worldly employments and amusements, works of necessity and mercy only excepted.

    XVIII. Liberty of Conscience.
    God alone is Lord of the conscience; and He hath left it free from the doctrines and commandments of men, which are in anything contrary to His word, or not contained in it. Civil magistrates being ordained of God, subjection in all lawful thing commanded by them ought to be yielded by us in the Lord, not only for wrath, but also for conscience sake.

    XIX. The Resurrection.
    The bodies of men after death return to dust, but their spirits return immediately to God -- the righteous to rest with Him; the wicked to be reserved under darkness to the judgment. At the last day, the bodies of all the dead, both just and unjust, will be raised.


    XX. The Judgment.
    God hath appointed a day, wherein he will judge the world by Jesus Christ, when every one shall receive according to his deeds; the wicked shall go into everlasting punishment; the righteous, into everlasting life.


    See also "Don't Just Do Something -- Stand There!: Southern Seminary and the Abstract of Principles", a convocation address delivered by R. Albert Mohler, Jr., President, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, August 31, 1993.

    http://www.baptist2baptist.net/b2barticle.asp?ID=47
     
  14. CubeX

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    Thanks Pistos for clarifying! I didn't recall God DIRECTLY calling John "the Baptist." But I see you meant that he was called that by the allowance of God through man, not through revalation.

    I'll post a reply to OldRegular's post soon. It looks GREAT!

    Thanks!
    -David
     
  15. El_Guero

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    Strange ... four several centuries, Baptists never had to be defined. Our theology was distinctly Biblical and Baptistic. Those that did not want to be Baptists went elsewhere.

    Our predecessors preached where ever they could find an opportunity. And if they could not find an opportunity, they would make one.

    They were imprisoned for preaching ...

    So, they preached from jail cell windows to people in the streets.

    Their imprisonment led to the "Bill of Rights" [Virginia REFUSED to continue forward with the Revolution if the non-REFORMED preachers were not protected.]

    Still, our ancestors were still persecuted.

    But, alas, today without persecution ... anyone can be a Baptist ... Just get sprinkled and it is ok ...
     
  16. CubeX

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    I agree with every point on OldRegular's list with only a hint of hesitatin of point 5, Election. However, this is only due to the radical, and often incorrect, interpretations. I do however believe in "being choosen" because it was not God's will that any should perish. The best example of this election is the calling of the disciples by Jesus. Any one of them could have told Him He was crazy and not followed him, but they did, and God foreknew. Because of that foreknowledge, he appointed them to be conformed to the image of Christ (Rom. 8:29). I have many more points on this area, but this is not the purpose of this topic. If anyone would like to discuss it, feel free to PM me or open a new topic (and notify me of it in case I do not see it) in regards to this topic.

    OldRegular answered my question of "What?" but now I would like to know how it differs from the theologies of, say, the Methodists, Pentecostals, etc. Or are there only differences in tradition, application, and/or church government/conduct/organization.

    Thanks, everyone is being a great help (well...almost everyone [​IMG] )
    -David
     
  17. Bro. James

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    Again, there is no such entity as: The Baptist Church; therefore, there is no "Baptist Theology" as such. True Baptists have no denomination--they are not part of the Protestant Reformation. True Baptists were worshipping God in Spirit and in Truth long before Luther, Calvin, Knox and others were born. True Baptists trace their faith and practice to the shores of Galilee where Jesus said, "Come, follow me; I will make you fishers of men".

    There are two basic Bible doctrines which separate True Baptists from any other groups: Baptism and the Lord's Supper. A study of the terms: "alien immersion" and "closed communion" will verify these lines of demarcation which have existed ever since someone decided to baptize infants in an effort to save their souls--the same group who introduced "transubstantiation" or "real presence" into the memorial supper.

    A study of the "re-baptizers" will also shed some light on this subject. Millions have died for refusing to baptize their infants--not many years ago. How soon we forget!

    We live an ecumenical time. Satan has redoubled his efforts to disguise false doctrine. Beware of the wolves dressed as sheep.

    Selah,

    Bro. James
     
  18. Pistos

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    truly aware... ;)
     
  19. mioque

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    "closed communion"
    ''
    Counting all those on earth who call themselves Christians, closed communion is actually the more common practice of the 2 (the other being open communion).
    The RCC also practices closed communion. So do all the Eastern-Orthodox churches. Taking into account that they actually think they're manipulating the real flesh of Jezus (the cannibals ;) ) they seem to have a better reason to do it than those silly Landmarkers.

    "alien immersion"
    "
    Nowadays it is the minority position but prior to 1963 , demanding outsiders needed to be rebaptized to join your denomination was the more common practice with all those who claim to be part of Christianity.
    If one converted to the RCC one had to be rebaptized. It was actually the Dutch cardinal Alferink who pushed through the change at Vaticanum II.
     
  20. CubeX

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    Interesting. So do any of you believe that the Baptist belief should be re-examined to see if any changes are needed to affect the outreach in these modern times?

    -David
     

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