What is blasphemy?

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Darren, Apr 17, 2008.

  1. Darren

    Darren
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    Recently I have started to wonder about this particular issue. Is blasphemy an old term we should no longer use, or does it still apply?

    My problem is the rampant manner in which believers declare every random idea that pops into their head as being "from God". For instance, a pastor gets up and declares that last night God lead him to a certain sermon. However it turns out that another pastor will give an opposite sermon, yet claim the same authority, God Himself. Should I demand a sign? That's how it was done in the old testament. Presenting your opinion is one thing, but saying its from God, I would think, is quite another. Am I blowing things out of proportion, or is this taking God's name so lightly, something that needs to be addressed?
     
  2. Palatka51

    Palatka51
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    It still applies.

    It is what got Lucifer thrown out of heaven. If anyone, Angel or man proclaims that they know better than God they have set themselves above God. That is blasphemy. For instance if I were to deny Christ for my salvation it is the same as putting myself above Christ's sacrifice. That is blasphemy. If I were to take it upon myself to say G-- D--- to anyone I have passed judgment that only God could make, putting myself in the place of God. That is blasphemy.
     
  3. DHK

    DHK
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    Blasphemy:
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/blasphemy

    Blasphemy is insulting God, or showing a lack of reverence to him. There are many ways one can do that. One way, of course, is by cursing.
    But the most common form is by denying some essential doctrine such as the deity of Christ, his substitutionary atonement, etc. To deny what Christ did on the cross is an insult to him. Thus it is blasphemy. To say that he is just a man, when He is King of kings, the Creator of the universe, is blasphemy. It is very insulting to him. We dare not insult our Lord and Saviour or blaspheme his holy name.
     
  4. standingfirminChrist

    standingfirminChrist
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    It is interesting that in the book of Matthew, Jesus separates blasphemy from sin.

    Matthew 12:31 Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men.

    Every manner of sin... and ... blasphemy.

    Why does He separate the two? Is He saying blasphemy is not sin?

    Every manner of sin would indicate to me ALL Sin. But He separates blasphemy from all sin.
     
  5. Darren

    Darren
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    In context, it says that even those who speak against the Son of Man, I assume unknowingly, will be forgiven. -proper context is Matthew 12:22-37)

    I think in context, this is really saying, "how can I be possessed by Satan and use that power to drive him out? That doesn't make sense." Such would be like knowingly rejecting God, and expecting forgiveness (blasphemy). I do use true power, like a man cannot rob a strong man without first tying him up, but if the power is from Satan, that shows Satan is divided and ready to distroy himself. He whom is truely against me, I am against, and his words shall condemn him.

    (BTW, careful. Those are near quotes, not my opinions.)

    Jesus seems to be on a rant in this passage, but stick with it and it all eventually makes sense.
     
    #5 Darren, Apr 18, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 18, 2008
  6. DHK

    DHK
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    Blasphemy is indeed sin, one of the worst kind.
    You have ignored context.

    Matthew 12:31 Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men.

    "all manner of sin and blasphemy, but the blasphemy against...."
    He mentions all different kinds of sins and all different types of blasphemies that will be forgiven, in contrast to one kind of blasphemy that will not be forgiven, and that is "blasphemy against the Holy Spirit."
    The grammar makes it plain. It is set in contrast: all manner of...blasphemy...but the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit.
     
  7. Darren

    Darren
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    In proper context that verse is almost irrelivent actually. It does nothing to define blasphemy, nor speaks about what it means to falsely assume the authority of God, nor does it talk about what should be done about such. It talks about a specific kind of blasphemy, and more over, that is NOT the subject of the section. The subject of that sentence is Jesus' response to the Pharasee's accusation that he was possessed by Satan himself.


    Please consider your references more carefully, I'm sure this was a mistake.
     
  8. David Lamb

    David Lamb
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    Does the fact that Jesus says "sin and blasphemy" mean that blasphemy is not a sin? I don't think so (nor am I saying that SFIC meant that :) ), for in Mark 16.7 the angel tells the women at the tomb:



    "But go your way, tell his disciples and Peter that he goeth before you into Galilee: there shall ye see him, as he said unto you."



    Does that mean that Peter was not a disciple of Jesus Christ? Is it not more likely that Peter is mentioned to emphasise that in spite of his denial of the Saviour, he was still a disciple. Could it also be that Jesus said "and blasphemy", not to distinguish blasphemy from sin, but to emphasise that blasphemy is included? Also, what would we make of a verse like Hebrews 10.17?



    And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more.



    Or Ephesians 2.1?



    And you hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins;



    Are iniquities sins? Are trespasses sins? If they are (and I would be surprised if any of us truly believed they were not), we might equally question the phrases "sins and iniquities", and "trespasses and sins", just as much as "sin and blasphemy".

     
  9. Palatka51

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    The subject is blasphemy, the context is Jesus' response to the Pharisee's accusation that he was possessed by Satan.
     

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