What systematic theology texts are you most thankful for?

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by scooter, Nov 24, 2004.

  1. scooter

    scooter
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    I could have posted this in the book forum, but I wanted to limit the input to us "theologians".

    Keeping in the holiday spirit, what systematic theology texts are you most thankful for?
     
  2. Charles Meadows

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    None! Although I own multiple ones and have read others as well I don't like them. They foster the system of establishing a doctrine based on a few verses and then interpreting everything using that framework.

    Comepare Hodge to Chafer to Geisler...

    But they do make good shelf adornments.
     
  3. Gary Ramelot

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    That reply shows that your books do indeed collect a lot of dust.
    Try reading them.
    As for me, I read Hodge, Warfield, and of course
    being a good Calvinist; I read the man himself
     
  4. Dr. Bob

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    Sad commentary on one who gives no thanks for standing on the shoulders of giants.

    Emory Bancroft's "Christian Theology" (NOT Elemental Theology) is a great BASIC theology (Bible College level). Strong's "Systematic Theology" is the MEAT (Seminary level) but tough reading.
     
  5. Gary Ramelot

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    I apologize if I didn't give proper reverence to the authors I spoke of, they are indeed giants.
    I havn't read Bancroft, and I agree, Strong's is good stuff. I have noticed in some cases (not all) if you read to many different theologies you may find yourself in a situation of not knowing what to believe. I think it's best to always start with the essentials.
     
  6. Charles Meadows

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    Certain books do gather dust but many don't. My Stanley Porter and Bruce Waltke books are currently getting the most use. And as for systematic theologies I have read multiple ones. Hodge is good, Van Til is quite erudite, Geisler is OK, Chafer is well - Chafer...And the list goes on.

    I personally see systematic theology as an excrescense of biblical theology - though many may see it the other way around. A "systematic theology is gradually assimilated" from the Bible - not learned verbatim from someone else's book and then thrust ON the Bible...

    I WOULD expect the Calvinist to be the biggest proponent of systematic theology because he approaches the Bible with a framework already eastablished. And thus the errors of Calvinism (heh heh [​IMG] a whole different topic!).

    And I am quite thankful to the GIANTS upon whose shoulders I stand for they are many.
     
  7. Daniel David

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    Yes, errors such as the sovereignty of God and sinfulness of man should be avoided like the plague.
     
  8. scooter

    scooter
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    Whether we admit it or not, all serious bible students have their own theology; hopefully, it is biblical! To discard out of hand the works of great men - men who were filled with Holy Spirt - is arrogant. It reminds me of the man who doesn't read any commentaries because "the Holy Spirit teaches him directly from the pages of scripture." Such a man has a high regard for the Holy Spirit's ministry in his life while totally discounting the Holy Spirit's ministry in the lives of others. Of course, we should not become handicapped by a dependence on these tools, but they are tools and can be used. We need to have the attitude of the Bereans.

    Having said this, I use frequently use Strong's Systematic Theology, but as Dr. Bob said, it is not easy reading, especially with the tiny print. The other volume I use is Barackman's Practical Theology. I certainly don't agree with everything in any work, but who does?
     
  9. Paul33

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    Most recently, Grudem's is great for college kids who run into new ideas from friends, etc. I'm giving a copy to my daughter for Christmas.

    Erickson's is also a good up to date ST.

    I also have Strong, Theisen, and Bancroft's Elemental Theology from Bible college days.

    I am really enjoying Grudem. Worth buying.
     
  10. LadyEagle

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  11. 3John2

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    I"m currently working my through Grudem's as well. I think it is GREAT. I would STRONGLY recommend that one to anyone. It's NOT a hard read by any stretch. I think anyone willing put burn the midnight oil will greatly benefit by a perusal of God's Word using the Grudem. I will be giving one away for Christmas as well this year. Also the bibliography on it & it's references to OTHER systematics is refreshing.
     
  12. Daniel David

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    Great, I have a stalker on the Baptistboard. I sure hope I don't go senile when I am old.
     
  13. OldRegular

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    I am new on this forum. Are you serious or pulling some ones chain?
     
  14. OldRegular

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    While it would not be considered a book on Systematic Theology I think the Manual of Theology by John Dagg, is excellent. This was the first book on theology by a Southern Baptist.

    I have read Conner and Mullins in my younger days but frankly I don't try to plow through books on Systematic Theology at my age but use them primarily as resource material.

    I find Boyce to be useful though difficult to read because of the format. I have also found a relatively new book on Systematic Theology by Robert Reymond, a Presbyterian, to be useful.

    I am in possession of A Body of Divinity by John Gill but the small print and sparsity of punctuation [apparently a trait of that age] make it impossible for me to read.
     
  15. Charles Meadows

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    Originally posted by Daniel David:
    Yes, errors such as the sovereignty of God and sinfulness of man should be avoided like the plague.


    I am new on this forum. Are you serious or pulling some ones chain?

    No he's kidding. He's evidently a very defensive Calvinist.
     
  16. Paul33

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    We are talking about ST texts. How in Heaven's Name did this other "stuff" get in this thread?
     
  17. Daniel David

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    I think the work of T.P. Simmons is pretty good. I don't agree with his congregational idea of church government, or his near landmark view of the church, but the work is calvinistic and premillenial (which means he is a thinking person).

    I cut my teeth on Ryrie's S.T. It is pretty good for the highschool / biblecollege level.
     
  18. OldRegular

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    Frankly I think Ryrie should be avoided by all but the most mature students of Scripture, those who are really able to "rightly divide the word"!
     
  19. Daniel David

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    Why? If it is just a basic introduction to S.T.?
     
  20. Charles Meadows

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    I'd avoid Ryrie altogether! :D
     

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