What's with the Titles ?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by pinoybaptist, Jan 11, 2008.

  1. pinoybaptist

    pinoybaptist
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    African-American...Filipino-American....Korean-American...Japanese-American...etc., etc., etc.

    I am not bashing any race here.

    I just think that there is only American. Period. No ifs, no buts.
    The brown man, the Filipino, for example's claim to being Filipino, is just his skin. MOST ESPECIALLY the natural born American one.

    My grandson is an American. He was born here, and will be bred and raised here.

    His dad, my son, is Filipino by birth, but is now an American.

    My grandson cannot claim to be Filipino-American. I do not appreciate that.

    Because he does NOT KNOW FILIPINO CULTURE, having been born, bred, and raised here in America.

    He only knows American culture. He only speaks American English. His ways are American. His attitudes are American. His taste for food will be primarily American. He will look at American women and see their beauty and it will not be the same as the way he will see the beauty of other women of other races. His preference will be for the American who speaks his tongue, thinks his thoughts, acts his acts.

    If perchance he goes to his father's birth country, he will not know what it is to eat fish paste, or use fish sauce, or eat raw fish in coconut milk or just plain soy sauce and vinegar. He will not know how to eat raw buffalo meat, or drink rice wine with it. His stomach will not take in Filipino water, he will not TRUST it, he will most likely look for bottled water.

    He will not know how to walk two miles an hour in waist deep mud, or ride a water buffalo, or walk miles to the next village to sing serenades to the lasses there. Not his way.

    His culture is American.

    No such thing as Filipino-American.

    When one becomes a naturalized American, he renounces his loyalty to his birth country, and declares his loyalty to this country. His former people are no longer his people, the Americans are his people.

    If he gets caught in a bad situation in another country, his former country's military will not come and get him, the US Marines probably will.

    Just thinking loud about this.

    Again, I am not bashing anyone.
     
    #1 pinoybaptist, Jan 11, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2008
  2. Rippon

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    John Wayne did a recitation called "Hyphen" a long time ago ( maybe the early 70's ) . It was wonderful . He too decried the use of hyphens to differentiate Americans . I'm with you PB , and the Duke !
     
  3. The Scribe

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  4. LadyEagle

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    Great post, PB. You are 100% right on. :thumbs:
     
  5. faithcontender

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    Sometimes people use the title because they want to earn recognition and favor from both countries. It's just like politics....
     
  6. Gold Dragon

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    I am a Chinese-Canadian who lived for 3 years in the U.S. and I am married to a Chinese-American-Canadian (dual citizen). We are now living in Australia.

    I am Chinese.
    I am Canadian.
    My wife is both as well as being American.

    My culture is Chinese-Canadian which is different from chinese and different from Canadian.

    My english is Torontonian and is starting to pick up some Aussie slang. I speak Cantonese conversationally and was able to get by with "tourist" mandarin for a few weeks in China.

    I've spent several months in different parts of China and Hong Kong and would not identify with their cultures but enjoyed the food which is pretty similar to the food I cook and the food I eat in North American and Australian chinese restaurants.

    Do I have your permission to have a hyphen in my title? ;)
     
  7. webdog

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    Sure...along with :confused:

    :D
     
  8. billwald

    billwald
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    I suspect you don't go around saying "I need a special deal because I am Chinese-Whatever and everyone hates me."

    Snohomish County, WA has many people from Korea. There are "Korean" businesses all over the place that are patronized by most everyone. Also Chinese, Thai . . . these people don't make a big deal about their ancestory. They are not "political."

    We have very few black people who are constantly crying "Nobody loves us, everybody hates us," and run for political office. This being the Soviet of Washington, any black person who can read and write can get elected to something at least once.

    But there no obvious black businesses in the county, maybe one night club. Every other sort of ethnic person has businesses here.
     
  9. bobbyd

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    American here...who just happens to be from Cajun heritage.
     
  10. pinoybaptist

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    I guess this is what I am saying.
    Of Filipino heritage.
    Of African heritage.
    Of Korean heritage.

    But, American, 100%.
    If not by birth, then by affiliation, or by law.

    Therefore, I will push Amrica and being American in the forefront.

    I respect my heritage, but they're past, not present, for me.
    I hope my grandson says in the future:

    I love my pa, and love my grandpa, and love my folks in the Philippines.
    But I'm American, and proud of it.
    I do not like being a hyphenated American.

    They left their countries and came here for a better life.
    Hopefully they got their better lives.
    I have a better life, a great country, with a great history and tradition.

    But as far as my heritage is and as far as my father's folks are back there, that's their country and those are their people, America is my country and Americans, with all their faults, and all their strengths, are my people.

    I refuse to be hyphenated.

    I hope that's what all my grandchildren all say.
     
  11. Gold Dragon

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    I think the contrast between pinoybaptists' view and my view highlight a major difference between the "melting pot" immigration culture of the US and the "mosaic" immigration culture of Canada.

    American nationalism demands that when one becomes an american, they lose their previous culture and heritage and adopt or melt into an "American" culture.

    The Canadian immigration culture embraces and celebrates the previous culture of the immigrant as a contribution to the patchwork mosaic of Canadian culture.

    I think there are pros and cons to both approaches.
     
  12. Ivon Denosovich

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    Wouldn't all of us be considered Christian Americans? Is it possible to just be one "thing?" Most Baptists I've heard say they're Christian first, American second. (Not that that's a bad thing.)
     

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