Where do you stand

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by RichardJS, Mar 18, 2007.

?

I hold to

  1. Covenant theology

    9 vote(s)
    45.0%
  2. Dispensational theology

    6 vote(s)
    30.0%
  3. Neither, I will explain below

    5 vote(s)
    25.0%
  1. RichardJS

    RichardJS
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    Seeing I am new to BB I am wondering about the theological makeup of the board. I hold to covenant theology.
     
  2. Jon-Marc

    Jon-Marc
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    Can you explain them to those of us who are not Bible scholars? Then maybe I can answer the question. All I know is I was born again on May 18, 1963, and I'm looking for the Lord to come.
     
  3. RichardJS

    RichardJS
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  4. Salty

    Salty
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    I wasnt able to vote, you didnt put "fence" :laugh:
     
  5. Repairman Jack

    Repairman Jack
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    When I came back from the Presbies, I took the best parts with me.
     
  6. EdSutton

    EdSutton
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    RichardJS, I realize you are fairly new to the BB but you who do not list yourself as a Baptist (unlike another newbie, Repairman Jack, just above this post) are posting in a "Baptist Only" forum, here. You might wanna' rethink either your profile, or reserve your postings to the "All Christians" forums. Just a friendly reminder.

    Ed
     
    #6 EdSutton, Mar 18, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 18, 2007
  7. Tom Butler

    Tom Butler
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    My present eschatological predisposition is Historical Premillenialist. That's the pre-mil without the dispy. Post-trib, in other words.

    That's where I am today. I wasn't there for a while, and I may not be there tomorrow. If I go anywhere else, it would probably be A-mil.
     
  8. Ed Edwards

    Ed Edwards
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    I am both.

    Both view points explain a lot - neither defines God.
     
  9. EdSutton

    EdSutton
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    I'm Pro-millenial myself! All for it!

    Ed
     
  10. ~JM~

    ~JM~
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    I'm closer to New Covenant Theology but I don't consider myself NCT either but it does seem to be very "baptistic." The Master's Seminary has some good articles on the topic of covenants.

    From the site:
    Introduction to the Biblical Covenants: The Noahic Covenant and The Priestly Covenant (173-89)
    by Irvin A. Busenitz

    The prominence of the OT covenants throughout the Bible makes various facets of information about them-the etymology of the OT term, the OT and NT usages of relevant term s, covenant phraseologies, pledges, signs, witnesses, consequences, conditionality, and the number of covenants- matters of deepest interest to students of the Bible. The six covenants that provide a foundation for understanding God's working in human history are the Noahic, the Abrahamic, the Priestly, the Mosaic, the Davidic, and the New covenants. The Noahic Covenant came at the time of the great flood when God promised Noah, his family, and all mankind subsequent to them that He would never destroy the world with a flood again and gave a sign of the rainbow to remind Himself of His promise. God made the Priestly Covenant with Phinehas when Phinehas executed an Israelite man and a Moabite woman who were in process of consumm ating marriage with one another. He made it clear that this covenant like the other unconditional covenants was to be perpetual too.

    The Abrahamic Covenant (191-212)
    by Keith H. Essex

    All admit the importance of the Abrahamic Covenant in understanding biblical revelation, but not all agree on its interpretation. Genesis 12 is a pivotal statement of the covenant because it contains God's first recorded speech to Abraham. There God promises to make Abraham a great nation, to bless him, and to make his name great. Genesis 15 makes clear that the LORD took upon Himself alone the responsibility for fulfilling the covenant. Genesis 17 adds the revelation that the covenant would be everlasting. Genesis 18 and 22 restate terms of the covenant in connection with the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and the offering of Abraham's son Isaac. Exodus through Deuteronomy describe the initial outworking of the Abrahamic Covenant. The elements of the covenant are threefold: making Abraham into a great nation, blessing Abraham personally, and blessing all nations in Abraham. The promises of the covenant are unconditional. The rest of the OT repeatedly refers back to God's oath to Abraham in the Torah. The NT does the same by pointing out that Jesus Christ, Abraham's seed, will make possible the final fulfillment of that covenant in the future.

    The Mosiac Covenant (212-32)
    by William D. Barrick

    The Mosaic Law is one of six covenants that God made with Israel, all six of which have five concepts in common: their authority resides in Him, they all came at a time of crisis, no covenant nullifies a previous one, salvation from sin is not obtained by keeping any covenant, and significant negative events followed the instigation of each. The theological context of the Mosaic Covenant is Israel's election by grace and the redemptive context God's deliverance of Israel from Egypt. The content of the covenant follows the pattern of the ancient suzerainty treaty. The covenant was the most conditional of all the covenants, and like all the covenants, it promised blessings for obedience and curses for disobedience. The covenant addressed itself to Israel and Israel alone with its divinely authoritative rules that stipulated standards of righteousness. No one can justly separate the moral, civil, and ceremonial parts of the Law from each other; it is a unit. The Law has no authority over Christians because it has been fulfilled by the death of Christ.

    The Davidic Covenant (233-50)
    by Michael A. Grisanti

    The centrally important Davidic Covenant was one of the "grant" covenants, along with the Abrahamic Covenant, in contrast to the Mosaic Covenant that was a "suzerain-vassal" treaty. Second Samuel 7:8-16 articulates the Davidic Covenant in two parts: promises that find realization during David's life and promises that find realization after David's death. Though "grant" covenants such as the Davidic are often considered unconditional, conditionality and unconditionality are not mutually exclusive. God's covenant with David had both elements. Psalms 72 and 89 are examples of ten psalms that presuppose God's covenant with David. Various themes that pervade the Abrahamic, Mosaic, Davidic, and New covenants show the continuity that connects the four.

    The New Covenant (251-70)
    by Larry D. Pettegrew

    Theologians of all kinds focus on Christ as the key to understanding the biblical covenants. Two significant characteristics of the New Covenant promised to Israel are its newness in replacing the Mosaic Covenant and its everlasting and irrevocable nature. For Israel the New Covenant promises her transformation through providing her a new heart, her final and permanent forgiveness, and the consummation of her relationship with the Lord. Through Israel God will also bless the Gentiles because of this covenant. As mediator of the New Covenant, the Messiah will be identified with Israel as God's Son, Servant, covenant, and Abraham's seed. Though the Messiah is not yet identified nationally with Israel, He is already identified with the church. Terminology and provisions spelled out in the NT indicate that Christ inaugurated the New Covenant at His first advent. Though the New Covenant will not be fulfilled with Israel until her future repentance, the church through Spirit baptism into Christ participates in that covenant.

    Bibliography of Works on the Biblical Covenants (271-79)
    by Dennis M. Swanson

    This issue of The Master's Seminary Journal contains articles on the biblical covenants. This bibliography represents the collected research of the authors and some additional sources that were consulted, but not cited in the articles. Its five sections are (1) Reference Works, (2) Systematic Theologies, (3) Monographs and Multi-Author Works, (4) Journal Articles, and (5) Unpublished Materials. The listing is not exhaustive, but will serve as a foundation for readers desiring to pursue the study further. Included also are articles and entries in some standard reference works that will be a starting point for those to whom the study of the biblical covenants may be new.
     
  11. North Carolina Tentmaker

    North Carolina Tentmaker
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    I voted neither, I believe in a God who is the same, yesterday, today, and forever (I think I read that somewhere)
     
  12. Ed Edwards

    Ed Edwards
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    Amen, Brother EdSutton -- Preach it! :thumbs:
     

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