Where the WMDs Went

Discussion in 'Politics' started by KenH, Nov 17, 2005.

  1. KenH

    KenH
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    An interview with Bill Tierney who was a U.N. inspector in Iraq in the 1990s.


    Interview LINK
     
  2. johnp.

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    Do I take it then Ken that you do not oppose the invasion of Iraq? I didn't read the whole of that report quoted.

    john.
     
  3. StraightAndNarrow

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    Where did he answer the question? I saw a lot of talk about "smoking guns" and Iraq's throwing roadblocks into the inspection process. He also dwelt on how despicable all Democrats are but he never answered the question.
     
  4. KenH

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    Yes, I support the war, but I think we need to be out of there by the end of 2006, which will be almost four years. And I have a grandnephew in the U.S. Army serving there currently.
     
  5. Joseph_Botwinick

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    I don't think we should set a timetable for the terrorists to watch. I think that plan is irresponsible...which is why the president continues to refuse to do so.

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  6. poncho

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    "Where the WMDs Went"

    Didn't we blow a bunch of them up during the opening phases of the Iraq war in the 90's? I seem to remember reports of this happening then for some reason.

    I think it might be one of the reasons the defense dept gave for the soldiers coming back with gulf war syndrome. Couldn't be the DU and experimental vaccines they were subjected to.
     
  7. KenH

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    One can be in favor of a phased withdrawal from Iraq using a timeline without being in league with the Surrendercrats in Congress.
     
  8. hillclimber

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    Not at this time, one can't.
     
  9. Johnv

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    Still hanging on to the "DU" myth. Depleted Uranium is not significantly radioactive. In fact, the radioactivity of DU gives off less radiation than the natural environment. DU is not harmful. That is 100% fact.

    The argument reminds me of the argument over irradiated food. Baseless. DU conspiracy theorists love to point at the "U" without regards to the "D".
     
  10. poncho

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  11. hillclimber

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    good stuff there. I emailed them with the question, "How can people continue to live in Nagasaki and Hiroshima after the bombs."
     
  12. emeraldctyangel

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    Gulf War Syndrome Causes

    *Exposure from Scuds*
    During the Gulf War, Iraq's military used Inhibited Red Fuming Nitric Acid as the oxidizer in several weapon systems, including the Scud, Guideline, Silkworm/Seersucker, and Kyle missiles. These weapon systems were used throughout the Kuwait theater of operations. When a Scud missile broke up, impacted, or was intercepted by Coalition weapons, the missile fuel and IRFNA combination could have exposed some troops to nitric acid and nitric dioxide.

    *Munitions demolition*
    Some troops were exposed to very low levels of chemical warfare agent resulting from the demolition of munitions at Khamisiyah.

    *Pesticides*
    US military personnel who served in the Gulf War were not only exposed to chemicals in the ambient environment; they were also exposed to chemicals associated with their occupational activities. For example, pesticides were widely used to control insects, rodents, and other disease-carrying pests. These pesticides were applied where veterans worked, ate, and slept. Some subgroups of the general military population, that is, applicators who were involved in the day-to-day handling and use of pesticides, and who did not wear personal protective equipment, may have been exposed to certain pesticides above levels considered safe for human health. Some were also used in enclosed spaces when they were specifically designed to be used outdoors only.

    *Oil Well Fires*
    The most visible source was the smoke from hundreds of oil well fires that burned out of control over a period of about nine months. Depending on their proximity to the burning oil wells, veterans were exposed to varying levels of petroleum combustion pollutants for hours to months in duration.

    *Particulate Matter*
    Which oddly enough is not that widely discussed in open forums. Wonder why.

    *Possible contamination of Water Supply*
    Anecdotal reports suggested that some short-duration illnesses such as diarrhea and similar gastrointestinal illnesses may have been triggered by contaminated, over-chlorinated, or improperly stored drinking water, or by contaminated water used to grow the local produce eaten by veterans.

    *Chemical Agent Resistant Coating*
    The very thing we used to paint the tanks and other equipment to convert from woodland to desert, contained a coating calle CARC.

    Equipment painted was done by hand in Saudi.Some of these sites lacked the appropriate personal protective equipment to assure safe spray painting operations. Due to the lack of adequate personal protection, and a failure to adhere to applicable safety and occupational health policies and procedures, a number of soldiers directly involved in CARC painting may have suffered adverse health effects, primarily respiratory effects from exposures to hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and solvents.

    *Retrograde Equipment*
    Protocols set (the cleaning of equipment being sent back to the United States) are meant to prevent the spread of disease and protect US agricultural resources from plant and animal pests and diseases that may be brought into the country by contaminated equipment. Some report being overexposed to the contaminates, personnel were likely involved in washing the equipment.

    *Depleted Uranium*
    The Gulf War was the arena for the first battlefield use of armor-piercing munitions and reinforced tank armor incorporating depleted uranium. This very dense metal is a by-product of the process by which natural uranium is enriched to produce reactor fuel and nuclear weapons components. The leftover uranium, 40% less radioactive than natural uranium, is called depleted uranium, or DU. DU played a key role in US forces’ overwhelming success during the Gulf War. The extreme density of the metal and its self-sharpening properties make DU a formidable weapon. DU projectiles slice through thicker, tougher armor at greater ranges than do other high-velocity rounds. US forces also used DU to enhance their tanks’ armor protection. While DU’s combat debut showed the metal’s clear superiority for both armor penetration and protection, its chemical toxicity—common to all forms of uranium and similar to other heavy metals such as lead and tungsten—and its low-level radioactivity raised concerns about possible combat and non-combat health risks of DU.

    That clear it up for you?
     

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