Which study bible

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by Daniel1654, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. Daniel1654

    Daniel1654
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    Which study bible is the best?
    Scofield,
    Companion,
    Ryrie,
    Dake,
    Thompson.
     
  2. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell
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    I prefer Thompson.
     
  3. TCGreek

    TCGreek
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    From your list, I'll have to say Ryrie for theology and Thompson for his chain references.
     
  4. Psalm 95

    Psalm 95
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    The Thompson has very good chain references, it makes it easy to find a verse or study a topic. I you want to get to know the Bible the Thompon is very good, but it will not give you much directions in theology since there are no notes. I use the Thompson when studying topics and when doing a detailed study of a chapter. The archological chapter is also very good.

    The Ryrie has good notes and a chapter that out lines theology. I like the Ryrie, but for some reason I do not use it very much.

    The New Scofield in HCSB is my daily reading Bible (when not reading a Swedish Bible). I like it. I has chain references and notes. The notes do not take focus from the text as a study Bible with a lot of notes. An example with a study Bible with maybe to much notes is the NIV study Bible from Zondervan.

    I have not used the Dake, but if I listen to others an advice is to keep away from it, it is not good and teach a bad theology.

    Conclusion:
    1. A Thompson is very good for studying topics and finding verses, I think you should own one.
    2. You may also want a study Bible with notes that gives some directions theology. I would recomend the Ryrie, but at the same time the Scofield would not be bad either.

    Best Regards

    Psalm 95
     
  5. sister christian

    sister christian
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    When I graduated from high school in 84 ( I know...the dark ages! :smilewinkgrin: ) all I wanted was a genuine burgundy leather Ryrie Study Bible! :thumbsup: I think there is depth to the notes and chapter outlines, and I like that there are wide margains to write in. If I could afford it, I would get another one. Another good Bible that I saw recently was The Baptist Study Bible. I had never heard of it before, but I was really quite impressed with it. I need a new Bible, so I've been looking.
     
  6. donnA

    donnA
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    A little off topic, sorry. But you mentioned the ryrie and theology notes. I would like to have some book on baptist theology, but I want to be able to understand it also. Any suggestions?
     
  7. Psalm 95

    Psalm 95
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    A Theology for the Church, edited by Daniel Akin, with contributions from leading Baptist thinkers Albert Mohler, Jr., Paige Patterson, Timothy George, and many others, written 2007.. I have it in my bookshelf and am studying a chapter when I have time. It might be a little academic, but not that difficult.

    This the last months I have been studying Basic Theology: A Popular Systematic Guide to Understanding Biblical Truth, by Charles Ryrie. I think it is really easy to understand, A Survey of Bible Doctrine by Ryrie is even easier.

    For the distinctives if Baptists I have really liked The Baptist Way: Distinctives Of A Baptist Church by R. Stanton Norman.

    Best Regards

    Psalm 95
     
  8. donnA

    donnA
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    Thanks, I'll be looking into getting these. Appreciate your time.
     
  9. pinoybaptist

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    I have the Thompson's, a little bulky and heavy, but worth it.
    Of late, I like the Mc'Arthur study Bible, NKJV, because you learn what's happening elsewhere in the world while certain events were unfolding in the Middle East, particularly in Israel.
    I also like the Ryrie.
     
  10. go2church

    go2church
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    I would avoid dispensationalism all together and advise you to get a TNIV Study Bible
     
  11. Zenas

    Zenas
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    I would second that suggestion. If you don't like the NIV, Zondervan has the NASB Study Bible with the same references and footnotes.
     
  12. hawg_427

    hawg_427
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    I use my Ryrie in the NASB trans the most. I use my Dake's but do not put too much stock in the notes. I want to get a good Scofield KJV with the 1917 notes in it. I have a Thompsons but it is in the NIV translation that I do not use much anymore. Hope this helps. I think I refer to my Bible commentaries more than the notes.
     
  13. donnA

    donnA
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    After reading your post earlier, I checked out ryrie and found him to be a dispensalist, so I didn't look to buy anything by him.
     
  14. dragonfly

    dragonfly
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    My favorite study bibles:

    Spirit-Filled Study Bible

    NKJV Study Bible

    NIV Study Bible

    The Open Bible NLT

    My favorite is the Spirit-Filled Study Bible. I know it is Charismatic and has things in it written by many I don't particularly agree with, but there are many features which I find wonderful in studying the Word of God.
     
  15. EdSutton

    EdSutton
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    Personally, I would definitely recommend anyone dispense with using a word he or she cannot come close to spelling.
    "Dispensationalist" easily comes to mind, somehow, for an example. :laugh: [​IMG]

    OK, I admit it was a 'cheap laugh'.

    But hey, I can get 10 of the 'cheapies' for the price of a good one. [​IMG][​IMG]

    Ed
     
    #15 EdSutton, Apr 22, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2008
  16. EdSutton

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    This is neither the time nor place to argue for or against the merits of 'dispensationalism', or any other theological idea, for that is not germane to the thread.

    However, this is the place to note that any and every "Study Bible", of whatever 'flavor' (for actually, any Bible with any sort of notes, from center references, sidenotes and/or footnotes to the most voluminous notes is a "Study Bible"), is subject to the theological biases and preferences of the author(s), thus contains some 'system' of theology, by definition.

    The TNIV Study Bible and the NASB Study Bible are no different is this regard, than are the Scofield, 'Companion', Ryrie, Dake's or Thompson. There is simply no such animal as any totally 'impartial' "Study Bible".

    Neither is it 'required' that anyone adopt the theology of the 'Study Bible' 'he' is using, either, so -

    Go for whatever one you might prefer and "Happy reading and studying!". :thumbs:

    We'll discuss the merits of your and/or my theology, in another thread, perhaps.

    Ed
     
  17. donnA

    donnA
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    bargain hunter
     
  18. EdSutton

    EdSutton
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    As I tell my bride (to keep her off my case), when she is about to (usually, deservedly) get on me for buying something we probably didn't really need all that much,

    "It was a 'great deal'!" :D :laugh: :laugh:

    Ed
     
  19. convicted1

    convicted1
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    RE: Which study bible?

    I have read a few posts "downing" Dake's annotated study bible. I have one, and I have found it pretty handy. Mind you, I am not a charismatic, or even Church of God, but I do like mine. What I like about it is that it has some greek and hebrew translations with it. I do not put a lot of stock in the side notes, though. He does go on a few "tangents" with his beliefs. I give it a 7.5 out of 10 overall.

    In the FWIW category, Finis Dake did have a "shady" past. So tak his sidenotes with a grain, of shaker full, of salt.

    Willis
     
  20. go2church

    go2church
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    I'm not arguing, just giving my opinion and I would say the perceived bias you speak of is mitigated by a wide assortment of authors, which Ryrie, Thompson, Dake and Scofield definitely are not! If you're going to buy a study bible you need to know from whence it came.

    Dispensationalism, just so you know I can
     

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