Why Cremation?

Discussion in '2000-02 Archive' started by Aaron, Dec 30, 2001.

  1. Aaron

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    Those of you who are considering, or know someone who is considering (or considered), Cremation, what are your reasons? I would be interested to know.

    [ January 01, 2002: Message edited by: Aaron ]
     
  2. ChristianCynic

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    Mainly that it is not logical to take up so much space for graveyards. This ia a much greater problem in Europe, where there is so much less available space and more population density and a majority prefer cremation, than it is in America. Secondary reasons include that it is less expensive than body burial, while the result is actually the same; if you bury the body, it will just take centuries to accomplish what cremation will do in 3 hours.
     
  3. Helen

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    Choice # 1 -- pay several thousand to a funeral home and graveyard so my body can disintegrate slowly

    Choice # 2 -- cremate me so I will disintegrate somewhat more quickly, and let my kids have the money saved.

    Let's see....

    Since I don't think any of them want to stuff me and having me sitting in their living rooms looking at them, and since we are not rich enough to just throw away (and bury) a few thousand extra dollars, let the kids rejoice both that I am with the Lord and that they got a bit more money to help them out!

    I know I'm just a sentimental old fool, but I'd like to do as much for them as I can. [​IMG]
     
  4. Aaron

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    2 for 2 on purely economic grounds so far.
     
  5. donnA

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    Is there anything in the bible about cremation? I had heard something about it some years back, but don't recall what.
     
  6. Helen

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    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Aaron:
    2 for 2 on purely economic grounds so far.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    No, Aaron. I'm going to rot physically either way. Allow me to fertilize something sooner than later. It's good for the environment...
     
  7. Karen

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    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Helen:


    No, Aaron. I'm going to rot physically either way. Allow me to fertilize something sooner than later. It's good for the environment...
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Speaking unscientifically from my short but memorable cemetery career, most of the time cremation did seem to be the choice when economic reasons were the driving imperative.

    I am not trying to pick on you, Helen, but what you said above, I heard a lot. But it was ALWAYS from people planning ahead for themselves. NEVER from a person planning for the next day's funeral events for a child or grandchild that had just died.

    There are lots of frugal alternatives between a copper casket with gold leaf and just having ashes spread to the wind. It is good stewardship to plan ahead and discuss things. There are financial plans from most cemeteries and funeral homes to lock in prices and pay for things years in advance with payment plans, thus not having a burden on the family.
    (I and my family have done so.)
    If you move to a different area of the country, VERY often you can transfer even cemetery plans.

    That reminds me - I could write a book and maybe will sometime on the people and situations I encountered while I was doing this. A common scenario cemeteries deal with is helping an elderly person married for 50 years and who has a plot on the side of his spouse's plot. What to do now that she died 10 years ago and the second spouse just died? You can say no big deal but it sure can cause a family war. There are ways to deal with it.

    Anyway, funerals come in all varieties. I will have a funeral in church, not just in a funeral home chapel or graveside, even though it does cost significantly more.

    The basics of a traditional cemetery plot include a casket from the funeral home, a plot, maybe a liner or vault, an opening and closing of the plot, and ultimately a marker. The marker can go from very inexpensive to thousands of dollars. At the time of death, it is customary for family members to buy surrounding plots if they wish. They can always be resold.
    The advantage of modern cemetery plots is that care is perpetual. It does not come down to you showing up to mow or rake several times a year or hoping that your cousins do.

    Karen
     
  8. Helen

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    Hi Karen,

    I appreciate your concern and the tone of your letter. I was being flippant and that was probably uncalled for.

    Karen, my first husband left me with six children to raise by myself -- five are adopted special case kids. In order to keep the house we designed for special case youngsters and not sell it as part of the divorce settlement, I had to give up ALL alimony and most child support (I got a minimal amount for five years was all).

    We did it by growing our own vegetables, wearing hand-me-downs and being incredibly careful with everything. My oldest son was in college at the time and he came home for 2 years and worked as a night manager at the local KFC so we could stay afloat. Today he is a computer engineer with a top company who is paying for his M.S. and Ph.D. (he graduated with honors several years ago).

    In other words, it's been rough. Really rough. It's easier now, but we're not rich.

    I have told my children they can do what they want with me. Cremation is fine with me. I cannot see them spending their money so I have a place in the ground. If they want me in a casket for a church service, that is fine. If they want just a memorial service, that is fine. The funeral will not be for me; it will be for them. I will be gone. So whatever they are comfortable with is the important thing.

    For my part, we have struggled so long and so hard that I don't mind them saving a little money on the deal. Two are in college right now and trying to put themselves through.

    They have a life to live. Why spend so much money on the dead? It really does not make sense to me. But if it makes sense to them, well, I sure won't be around to stop them, will I? [​IMG]
     
  9. Karen

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    Helen,

    I greatly admire you. I hope you are working on a book about your experiences and that you will autograph a copy for me.
    I will buy a BUNCH of copies, so get busy!

    Karen
     
  10. Joy

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    My husband's first wife died of cancer when they were 26 years old. The cemetary took advantage of his grief and talked him into buying a double plot and stone, which he still owed money on when we got married.

    I remember having my birthday dinner that year with his former in-laws, and for some strange reason, the subject came up, and his father-in-law asked him what he was going to with the second plot and stone, now that he was married to me. He suggested that he buy the other one on the other side for me. :eek: I was rather mortified that they were discussing my burial plot while we were supposed to celebrating my birthday! :rolleyes:

    Anyway, my feelings were really hurt, and I couldn't bear the thought of sticking him in the ground next to her someday, with a stone that already said "beloved husband and wife, blah, blah, blah!" (I was a newly wed)

    Now I'm a little older and more secure in my marriage relationship, but we are still stuck with his former cememtary arrangments. We may not even live here when he leaves for heaven.

    Moral of the story, plan ahead, but be careful of "deals" like this. We don't know the future and the changes it may bring that may want us to change our minds.
     
  11. Kiffin

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    Cremation or burial what's the differance anyway? We will all go back to dust until the Resurrection gives us a new body.
     
  12. ChozGod

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    The thought of bugs eating my dead body isn't too pleasing, I rather burn and being scattered on open land and like stated above "why waste the land?
     
  13. Jamal5000

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    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Aaron:
    Those of you who are considering, or know someone who is considering (or considerated), Cremation, what are your reasons? I would be interested to know.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Mom wants me to cremate her because she said coffins are just too high to just put into the ground.

    For me, anything goes I guess 'cause I'm gone.

    Jamal5000 [​IMG]
     
  14. Dr. Bob

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    Just went through a cremation for my Dad last year. Since he wanted a memorial service (no scripture, no preaching, just everybody invited to share) we had to have him embalmed, purchase a low-end coffin, etc.

    THEN the cremation. It still cost $5,000.00 which was way more than his insurance and GI benefit would cover.

    That was still cheaper than also buying a lot and headstone. We had his name engraved in a memorial wall at the cemetery and scattered his ashes in the headwaters of the Mississippi where he had hunted for nearly 70 years.

    Does someone have accurate costs for a funeral with a person cremated immediately (not having to pay for embalming and casket)?

    I'm thinking $2,000 for the package, rather than $6-8,000 of a traditional funeral. The difference was a nice downpayment on a house for my Dad's first grandson.
     
  15. Aaron

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    So far the reasons for cremation over burial are overwhelmingly economical. (Not saying this is right or wrong, just making an observation.)

    For some it is conservation. One thought the idea of rotting too repulsive.
     
  16. JAMES2

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    Cremation: Ashes put in lunch sack, taken to mountains and spread among the pines--$500.
    Funeral: Opening and closing, head stone, transportation, casket, blah, blah blah, -- $5,000-25000. Cremation will do.
    James2

    [ January 04, 2002: Message edited by: JAMES2 ]
     
  17. Amazing_Grace

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    I personally can't stand the thought of being underground. Rather silly, I know, since I won't know any better, but it still freaks me out. I've never considered the economical part of it.
     
  18. Jamal5000

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    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Amazing_Grace:
    I personally can't stand the thought of being underground. Rather silly, I know, since I won't know any better, but it still freaks me out. I've never considered the economical part of it.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    What makes you not like wanting to be underground? Are you afraid of the dark like me?

    :D [​IMG]
     

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