Will the hammer fall this time?

Discussion in 'Sports' started by ccrobinson, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. ccrobinson

    ccrobinson
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    After making a show of announcing how the drivers were going to be allowed to "have at it", Nascar's going to have to go back on that announcement after Carl Edwards turned Keselowski. It was a dumb thing to do at Atlanta, compounded by an even dumber action when he pretty much admitted what he was trying to do. Nascar has to sit him for a few races, right? Or, do they just do what they've always done and put him on "probation"?
     
  2. TomVols

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    Rock, hard place....meet NASCAR.

    If they lower the boom, it sends the signal that they don't want this and could get ratings in the short term but not in the long term.

    If they give a token suspension, it sends the signal that they want to be tough, but really would like publicity that they desperately want and are losing.

    If they do what they've always done...they'll get what they've always gotten. To say NASCAR has been toothless is an affront to teeth everywhere.

    Secretly, I bet they can't wait for Danica to get a Cup ride. Something's gotta give. NASCAR went from being in the 4-5 hole in popularity to being just above the PBA minor leagues. People are selling their Bristol seats for crying out loud. Satan's neighbors are shoveling their sidewalks.
     
  3. swaimj

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    Cynical Swaimj says:

    Look, NASCAR conducts four races a year at restrictor plate tracks that are all but GUARANTEED to feature airborn cars, so what's the big deal about Keso getting airborn? Secretly, most of the top 25 drivers think he had it coming to him and hopefully this teaches him a lesson. Let them both show up at Bristol and tangle again and the ratings should soar.


    But Real Swaimj says:

    A driver running 150 laps down should keep his bumper OFF the sixth place guy who's running for a win. Throw Carl out for three weeks!
     
  4. ccrobinson

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    I agree that they secretly think this, but I can't figure out what he's done to earn their anger. What has he done that nobody seems to like him? The first time I heard about drivers not liking him was when Denny Hamlin got mad at him for racing him so hard in a Nationwide race at Charlotte. However, Keselowski was on the lead lap, in 4th no less, when that happened and I thought Hamlin was being a whiny crybaby about it. In fact, that one incident made me think that Hamlin is, in fact, a whiny crybaby.

    If somebody can tell me why the drivers don't like Keselowski, I'd appreciate it.

    I vote that Nascar sits Carl down for 4 weeks.
     
  5. ccrobinson

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    Yahoo Sports put together some clips of incidents with Keselowski. They didn't show why Hamlin tried to swerve into him, and I still maintain that Hamlin's a whiny crybaby. But, it looks like there's evidence to support why many drivers don't like Keselowski.
     
  6. TomVols

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    With Edwards being somewhat popular, would NASCAR be more or less inclined to sit him?
     
  7. Steven2006

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    I read where he is getting just probation, not suspended.
     
  8. Steven2006

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  9. TomVols

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    I always roll my eyes when they say an athlete who does something egregious should face prosecution. The typical tackle in football would be a prosecutorial offense if done on a street corner among strangers. A beaning in baseball would as well. A hockey hit? Heck, that gets you sent to the gas chamber in some states. And we haven't even started on boxing, wrestling, MMA, etc. Many sports are simply sanctioned violence and appropriated criminal behavior for our entertainment purposes. So we can't ask for authorities to get involved when the normal activities and results thereof displease us.
     
  10. padredurand

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  11. Steven2006

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    For the most part I agree with your view. However your post doesn't address what this article is talking about at all (did you read it?). All your examples are well within the parameters of the sport being played. The author was talking specifically about as he puts it, "The general rule is that violence rises to the criminal level when it's not within the rules or norm of the game.". He drew the comparison to Todd Bertuzzi who was prosecuted for his attack of Steve Moore.

    I think he raises some valid points. Instead of the examples you give what would be your point of view be of a batter who after being hit by a pitch attacked the pitcher with his bat and ended up killing the guy? Or if not killing permanently disabling? That is more the point the writer is making.
     

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