Word Study, G5002, taktos

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Van, Aug 15, 2014.

  1. Van

    Van
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    This Greek adjective, taktos, has tasso (an arrangement by mutual consent) as its root. But this word (taktos) describes a prearranged and agreed upon event, or an event established by the proper circumstance. Thus to “set” sail on the rising tide aptly illustrates the full meaning of the word. In order to set sail a whole bunch of things need to happen in an ordered and arranged way, starting with the Captain giving the order, and then deck hands doing all manner of things.

    This word appears only once in scripture, in Acts 12:21 and is usually translated as a “set" day or an "appointed" day.

    Here is our verse:

    Acts 12:21, On an appointed day Herod, having put on his royal apparel, took his seat on the rostrum and began delivering an address to them.

    Since it is far more common to set a date or day, rather than appoint one, this verse would be better rendered as “On a set day Herod….
     
  2. Rippon

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    The translations are evenly divided on this one. Goodspeed breaks the tie with :"So a day was fixed..."
     
  3. Van

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    I found one more for set than for appointed, but that "set" number was bolstered by set appearing in the whole family of KJ versions. As I said in the OP, common usage today is to set a date or day for an event.
     
  4. Van

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    I was holding my Grandson a few days ago. He had been delivered at a hospital on the day set by the hospital, doctor and mother. He was, on that set day, arrayed in swaddling cloths, and placed in a little plastic crib, so I could look at him through a window into the nursery. His little life has set sail, and God willing he will be a blessing and bring joy to the word.

    And it all happened, according to a specified plan, on a set date, and even then, he was in God's hand.

    When we set a date, according to mutual consent, our arrangement can be described as "taktos."
     
  5. Logos1560

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    Several of the pre-1611 English Bibles of which the KJV was a revision have "And upon a day appointed" or "And upon the day appointed" at the beginning of Acts 12:21.
     
  6. Don

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    I'm curious: how does using "set" rather than "appointed", or "appointed" rather than "set", change the meaning of the context of this verse?
     
  7. Van

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    Hi Don, I think you do not understand the meaning of the word "context."

    If I wrote, "my wife bought a red dress" and the context was that I dislike the color red, the message changed based on the context. The context does not change, but the message changed in light of the context.

    Turning now to our verse, Acts 12:21, what is the context? Translating the message as clearly, accurately, and transparently as possible given the target audience's usage of the words in question?

    We set dates and days, and so set is better than appoint.
     
    #7 Van, Sep 1, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 1, 2014
  8. Rippon

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    That comment of yours Van, gave many a chuckle.

    I think you need to focus on what's important Van.
    Really? You never had an appointment book? You never had appointment dates on your calendar? You never had a medical or dental appointment?

    Nuff said... ;-)
     
  9. Van

    Van
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    More absurdity, nonsense and claims we appoint dates, rather than set them. Good Golly Miss Molly.
     
  10. Rippon

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    Let me get this straight. You have never had an appointment? You have never made an appointment? Very strange of you Van.

    Wow! What a cogent argument.
     
  11. Van

    Van
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    Just another totally off topic, change the subject post. You have got to love them folks.

    Just the other day, I set a date and time to see my dentist.
     
  12. Rippon

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    More commonly known as a dental appointment.
     
  13. Van

    Van
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    No, I made an appointment with my dentist, not with a day in November. But I set a date and time for an appointment with my dentist.
     
  14. Rippon

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    Yes, in the common vernacular that's called a dental appointment.
     
  15. Van

    Van
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    Now Rippon claims to set a date for a wedding is not the common vernacular, but we all make appointments for our weddings. Gotcha. :)
     
  16. Rippon

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    I made no such claim, but then you regularly deal in falsehoods.
     
  17. Van

    Van
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    Now lets change to subject to what someone said. Never ending disruption of any discussion of word study.

    I think someone should set a date to enforce the last part of Rule #8:
    Returning to topic:

    Acts 12:21, On an appointed day Herod, having put on his royal apparel, took his seat on the rostrum and began delivering an address to them.

    Since it is far more common to set a date or day, rather than appoint one, this verse would be better rendered as “On a set day Herod….
     
  18. Rippon

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    You spoke of your dental appointment back in post number 11 and following. Blame yourself.

    Picky, picky. Herod was king, so royal language is employed. "On a set day" is not quite up to snuff. "On the appointed day" is much more kingly and specific. (You love the word specific, don't you?)
     
  19. Van

    Van
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    Yet another ad homenim post, seeking to discuss poster behavior rather than views.

    Now we get "royal language" for justification of less than the best translation choice. You have got to love them, folks.
     
  20. Rippon

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    You can look high and low --there were none, unless you think "picky, picky" qualifies. Man, do you ever have thin skin.
    Only in the mind of Van. Look at the following language of kings:

    2 Samuel 18:1
    David mustered the men who were with him and appointed over them commanders of hundreds.

    1 Kings 12:31
    Jeroboam built shrines on high places and appointed priests from all sorts of people, even though they were not Levites.

    2 Chronicles 19:5
    He appointed judges in the land, in each of the fortified cities of Judah.
    __________________________________________________

    Thus using the word appointed is quite suitable for a king --whether godly or wicked.
     

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