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Baptist without Calvinism?

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by BrianT, Jun 20, 2003.

  1. BrianT

    BrianT New Member

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    Which elements of Calvinism can one disagree with and still be "Baptist", and which ones are crucial to the definition of "Baptist"?

    I'm looking for answers in terms of historical as well as modern definitions of Baptist.
     
  2. Pastor Larry

    Pastor Larry <b>Moderator</b>

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    If you are talking about Calvinism as a soteriology, nothing. You can believe it all and be Baptist. Or you can believe none of it and be baptist.

    However, by "calvinism" some people include such things as infant baptism, the sacraments, and covenant theology. While one can be a covenant theologian and be baptist, one cannot believe in or practice infant baptism or the sacraments and be Baptist. Infant baptism because it is not the NT practice of believer's baptism and the sacraments because of the view that teh sacraments convey grace or are a means of grace. The NT teaching is that these are ordinances--memorials--not means of grace.
     
  3. BrianT

    BrianT New Member

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    I've been examining some early Baptist confessions from the 1600s-1800s, and they usually mention election, preservation of the saints, etc. Were these things part of the "definition" of Baptist back then? Are they today?
     
  4. Pastor Larry

    Pastor Larry <b>Moderator</b>

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    I don't think they were ever a part of teh definition of Baptist per se. There were two groups of baptists: General and particular, so named because of their view of teh atonement. I think historically the particular baptists have been more evangelistic and have planted more churches, at least during certain periods.

    Those confessions simply laid out the biblical teaching on those issues and as a result those were the doctrines believed by those who subscribed to those confessions.
     
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