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bread and wine

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by Ps104_33, Aug 14, 2004.

  1. Ps104_33

    Ps104_33 New Member

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    I'm sure that this has been discussed before but I missed it so I have a few questions concerning the Lord's Supper.

    Is it absolutely necessary that unleavened bread and grapejuice be used in the Lord's Supper? Suppose that a pastor and some of his flock were stuck on a deserted island and didnt have access to unleavened bread and wine. Can a substitute be used such as coconut and coconut milk since it is symbolic?
    If the elements of unleavened bread and wine cannot be had should the ordinance be neglected?
     
  2. mioque

    mioque New Member

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    "Is it absolutely necessary that unleavened bread and grapejuice be used in the Lord's Supper?"
    ''
    We normally use leavened Turkish bread and grapejuice at my church. It's cheap, nobody complains about the taste and everybody can participate.
    If you want to go for perfect historical accuracy, you would need a lowquality very dry wine, heat it, dilute it with water and at honey (and possibly certain spices).
    And you don't even want to get into the type of bread that was used at the Last Supper,.
    You see some of the most venerable denominations in the world believe that it wasn't a Pesach meal, meaning that Jezus used leavened bread.
    The most ofbeat bread we ever used were croissants. That was last year, when our Sunday School did a series of lessons on the threat of Islam and a number of sermons covered the same subject.
    The traditional coffee after the service turned out to be cappucino that day.
    To celebrate the victory of Christendom over Islam in 1683.
     
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