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Does Romans 5:18 teach Universalism?

Discussion in 'Bible Versions & Translations' started by Van, Oct 14, 2020.

  1. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    Here is the NASB version of Romans 5:18:
    So then as through one transgression there resulted condemnation to all men, even so through one act of righteousness there resulted justification of life to all men.

    As translated the verse seems to say the result of Adam's sin is that all men were condemned. And, in a similar way, because of the sacrifice of Jesus, the result is all men have been justified. Or, to put it succinctly universal salvation. But is that the actual meaning of the verse? (Of course the answer is no, but where does the above view miss the mark?
     
  2. McCree79

    McCree79 Well-Known Member
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    "All men" refers to Jews and Gentiles. All types of men.

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  3. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    Thanks for attempting to resolve the difficulty arising from a misinterpretation of Romans 5:18.
    Since the construction is parallel, and "all men" refers to every individual in the first part of the verse, "there resulted condemnation to all men" one would suppose the author would be referring to the same group with "all men" in the parallel part of the verse.
     
  4. McCree79

    McCree79 Well-Known Member
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    Yes...it is the same group. Sin passed to all types of men. Jews and Gentiles....not just those who have been given the law. All people groups were made sinners due to one trespass. Chapter 3 makes it clear Paul speaks of people groups...which carries over here.

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  5. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    Lets back up and discuss the verse a few words (phrases) at a time. In the NASB rendering we find "one transgression" Many, and I believe most translations, agree and render the phrase "one offense or one trespass or one sin. However the King James family of translations goes with the offense of the one (referring to Adam). A few others and a few commentaries also go with offense of one. Contrary to the majority view, I think "offense of the one" (Adam) is the correct view. I think the context of verse 17 makes this view more likely.
     
  6. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    If it is the same group, no individual is exempted, all kinds of men refers to all men. Unless the premise is all men have not been made sinners...
     
  7. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1 Well-Known Member
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    all men would refer to all who have Jesus as their Lord now!
     
  8. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    So the condemnation only applies to the elect? Right, got it....
     
  9. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    The next phrase or two, says "into all humans into condemnation." The consequence of the offense of the one (or one offense) is "into all humans into condemnation. Now the Greek preposition "eis" translated literally as "into" is used metaphorically to indicate the affect one action has on something. It can refer to purpose, or the result. And here we come to the crux of the matter. The result was not applied immediately, but rather the result was all humans when conceived, would be conceived in a condemned state, in the realm of darkness, predisposed to sin. So the application of the sentence occurs when the person is conceived (spiritually born) in sin.
     
  10. 37818

    37818 Well-Known Member

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    John Owen makes the point regarding Roman 5:18 that justification in Christ is not without faith.
    '. . . Rom. v. 18, “The free gift came upon all men to justification of life:” which “all men,” that are so actually justified, are no more nor less than those that are Christ’s, — that is, believers; for certainly justification is not without faith.' page 146. Death of Death in the Death of christ.
     
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  11. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    So to drop the other shoe, when is the gift of justification to life applied. When God places that individual into the body of Christ. So just as the condemnation is applied when a person is conceived, the justification is applied when the person is born anew.
    And the idea is not one act of righteousness (Christ's sacrifice on the cross) but His righteousness through-out His sinless life which allowed Him to go to the cross as our sin sacrifice. So, "the righteousness of the One" is the correct rendering in my opinion.
     
  12. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    In summary, here is a more interpretive translation of Romans 5:18, So then as through the transgression of the one, there resulted condemnation applicable to all men, even so through the righteousness of the One, there resulted justification of life applicable to all men.
     
  13. 37818

    37818 Well-Known Member

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    is not Christ Lord of all, both the saved and lost? Romans 14:9, Philippians 2:6-10.
     
  14. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1 Well-Known Member
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    Yes, as all men must refer to those now in Christ!
     
  15. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    Romans 5:18,
    So then as through the transgression of the one,

    there resulted condemnation applicable to all men,

    even so through the righteousness of the One,

    there resulted justification of life applicable to all men.
     
  16. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    When is the condemnation applied? When the fallen are conceived and their human spirit formed within them.

    When is the justification of (eternal) life applied? When the fallen are born anew (made spiritually alive) when placed in Christ.

    Thus Romans 5:18, properly understood, does not support universal salvation.
     
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