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Featured Habakkuk 3:5 -- Pestilence and Plague

Discussion in 'Bible Versions & Translations' started by Just_Ahead, Mar 15, 2020.

  1. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    KJV
    Before him went the pestilence, and burning coals went forth at his feet.

    NKJV (1982)
    Before Him went pestilence,
    And fever followed at His feet.

    NASB (1995)
    Before Him goes pestilence,
    And plague comes after Him.

    RSV (1952)
    Before him went pestilence,
    and plague followed close behind.​

    CEB (2011)
    Pestilence walks in front of him.
    Plague marches at his feet.​

    NIV (1984)
    Plague went before him;
    pestilence followed his steps.​

    NLT (2015)
    Pestilence marches before him;
    plague follows close behind.​

    THE MESSAGE (2018)
    Plague marches before him,
    pestilence at his heels!​
     
  2. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    How do various english Bibles translate Habakkuk 3:5 of the Prayer of Habakkuk?
    I posted a few from some of the Bibles in my book shelf.

    *****

    What do commentaries and study bibles say?
     
    #2 Just_Ahead, Mar 15, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2020
  3. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    Henry Morris Study Bible (KJV) (2012) has four subheads in Habakkuk chapter 3.

    Prayer of Habakkuk
    3:1-2
    Glory of God
    3:3-4
    Power of God
    3:5-15
    Habakkuk Trusts in God
    3:16-19

    No notes specifically for Habakkuk 3:5.
     
  4. Logos1560

    Logos1560 Well-Known Member
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    Does the KJV also translate the Hebrew word at Habakkuk 3:5 as "burning heat" at Deuteronomy 32:24, as "hot thunderbolts" at Psalm 78:48, and as "arrows" at Psalm 76:3?
     
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  5. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    Holman KJV Study Bible (2012) has three subheads for Habakkuk chapter 3.

    Habakkuk's Prayer for Mercy
    3:1-7
    Praise for God's Power
    3:8-11
    God's Power for the Salvation of Israel
    3:12-19

    No notes specifically for Habakkuk 3:5.
     
  6. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    The Companion Bible (1922, KJV, Kregel) (E.W. Bullinger's notes, p. 1270) does provide a note for Habakkuk 3:5.

    Before Him went, &c. Supply the logical Ellipses : "[As He went forth to conquer for His People] before Him went", &c. See Ex. 23:27. Ps. 68:1,2.

    burning coals: or, lightning. Cp. Ps. 18:8; 76:3; 78:48.
     
  7. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    The Old Scofield Study Bible (1909, KJV, Oxford) states the following in the Introduction to Habakkuk p. 955).

    "The book is divided into 5 parts.

    Part I.
    Habakkuk's perplexity in view of the sins of Israel and the silence of God, 1:1-4. Historically this was the time of Jehovah's forbearance because of Josiah's repentance (2 Ki. 22:18-20).

    Part II.
    The answer of Jehovah to the prophet's perplexity, 1:5-11.

    Part III.
    The prophet, thus answered, utters the testimony to Jehovah, 1:12-17; but he will watch for further answers, 2:1.

    Part IV.
    To the watching prophet comes the response of the "vision," 2:2-20.

    Part V.
    All ends in Habakkuk's sublime Psalm of the Kingdom, 3:1-19."​

    Subhead at chapter 3 (p. 957):
    "Habakkuk's answer of faith."​

    No notes for Habakkuk 3:5.

    However, at Habakkuk 3:1, note 2 at the bottom of page 957, suggests prayer in the O.T. is in contrast with prayer in the N.T:

    "(1) In the O.T. basis of prayer is a covenant of God, or an appeal to his revealed character as merciful, gracious, etc.
    In the N.T. the basis of prayer is relationship: "when ye pray, say, Our Father" (Mt. 6:9).

    (2) Comparison of the prayers of Moses and Paul, show that one (Moses) was praying for an earthly people whose dangers and blessings were earthly; the other (Paul) for a heavenly people whose dangers and blessings were spiritual."​
     
    #7 Just_Ahead, Mar 16, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2020
  8. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    The Wiersbe Study Bible (NKJV, 2018) provides these gems in the Book Overview and "Be Transformed" introductions to Habakkuk (p. 1344-1345).

    "Habakkuk's little book indicates that he knew Scriptures well, was a competent theologian, and had great faith in God. Because of the psalm in chapter 3, some scholars think he may have been a priest who led worship in the temple. If so, then like Jeremiah and Ezekiel, he was a priest called to be a prophet--a more difficult ministry....Habukkak wrestles with God concerning the problem of how a holy God could use a wicket nation like Babylon to chasten the people of Judah, and then by faith, he embraces God and clings to His promises. Habakkuk also wrestles with the spiritual decline of the nation and why God wasn't doing something about it. Habakkuk wanted to see the people revived (3:2), but God wasn't answering his prayers--at least not the way he expected."

    "The prophet's statement, "the just shall live by his faith" (2:4) is quoted three times in the New Testament (Rom. 1:17; Gal. 3:11; Heb. 10:38)..."

    "One of the modern Christian myths that ought to be silenced says that when we trust Jesus Christ, we get rid of all our problems. We don't.... Christians who claim to be without problems are either not telling the truth or not growing and experiencing real life. Perhaps they are just not thinking at all. They're living in a religious dream world that has blocked out reality and stifled honest feelings. Like Job's uncomfortable comforters, they mistake shallow optimism for the peace of God and the good life for the blessing of God. You never hear them ask what both David and Jesus asked, 'My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me?' (Ps. 22:1; Matt. 27:46)."

    Habakkuk wasn't that kind of a believer. As he surveyed the land of Judah and then watched the international scene, he found himself struggling with serious problems. But he did the right thing: he took his problems to the Lord. His approach is definitely worth imitating!"​

    At Habakkuk 3:3-5, Warren Wiersbe's note (p. 1349) states:

    "In this song, Habakkuk seems to be retracing the march of Israel from Sinai to the Promised Land."​
     
    #8 Just_Ahead, Mar 16, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2020
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  9. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    A personal note:

    During my business career, our family was in fellowship with a local church in the Church of God tradition in Ohio--because our family could not find a suitable Baptist church at that time close to work, home, and schools.The Wesley Bible is a study bible I acquired at that time. This study bible brings in the Wesleyan Holiness theology, which can be found at Asbury Theological Seminary, Wilmore, Kentucky, and other fine colleges and seminaries. The Old Testament Editor of this study bible is Dr. John N Oswalt who has published several titles in the NICOT commentary series. I keep this study bible in my personal collection because I find the notes short, to the point, and easy to talk about with others -- 30 years later.

    As I remember from those warm fellowship days, many of the people in the pews had firm beliefs toward healing for the sick and aged. I include the following note from this study bible because I am looking for notes specific to Habakkuk 3:5 to share with others at the Baptist Board, where I fellowship online at this time in my life.​

    It is not my intent to offend any of my Baptist brothers and sisters reading this specific post.

    Thank you.​

    *****

    The Wesley Bible (NKJV, 1990, Nelson) note at Habakkuk 3:5 (p. 1365).

    "3:5 Pestilence and fever (disease), generally believed by the Canaanites to be independent forces, are shown here to be firmly under God's control."​
     
  10. Covenanter

    Covenanter Well-Known Member
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    I wrote a hymn based on Hab. 3 for a sermon - the mini-prayer "In wrath remember mercy" should be at the heart of our prayers today.

    Based on Habakkuk 3.
    1.
    God above, we have heard
    of your works in your Word,
    now revive in our day
    works of gospel power
    in this needy hour.
    In your wrath O Lord,
    In your wrath O Lord,
    In your wrath, yet in grace,
    Lord remember mercy.
    2.
    When God came to the land
    mighty power in your hand
    all your tribes marched with you,
    singing out your glory
    as they told the story.
    Mighty shouts of praise,
    Mighty shouts of praise,
    Shouts of praise filled the land,
    made the heathen tremble.
    3.
    Christ by signs led the way;
    fire by night, cloud by day,
    mountain heights, depths below
    could not stand before you,
    nations fell before you.
    So be warned, O earth,
    So be warned, O earth,
    So be warned all mankind,
    God is in his temple.
    4.
    Nations now spurn your Laws;
    all around, judgement falls,
    your redeemed on you call,
    keep us true & faithful;
    trusting, praying, watchful.
    May we watch and pray;
    May we watch and pray;
    Watch and pray every day,
    for our Lord is coming.
    5.
    Evil men rule the lands;
    they despise your commands;
    plundering all the earth,
    now the crops are failing
    poverty prevailing.
    Yet I will rejoice,
    Yet I will rejoice,
    I will joy in the Lord,
    God of my salvation.

    Based on Habakkuk 3
    © Ian Day – 2010.
    Tune Personnent Hodie - start note D, Dorian mode.



    Written for a sermon on the prophecy of Habakkuk. Verses 2 & 3 sing of Habakkuk's recounting God bringing Israel into the promised land.

    Verses 4 & 5 apply the song to our present situation.
     
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  11. Covenanter

    Covenanter Well-Known Member
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    Considering the OP, what Habakkuk is referring to is the plagues inflicted on Egypt that caused the Egyptians to allow the children of Israel to leave Egypt, & other aspects of God's providential dealings with them & the nations on their journey.

    Compare -
    Hab. 3:3 God came from Teman, the Holy One from Mount Paran. His glory covered the heavens and his praise filled the earth.

    Deu. 33:2 He said: “The LORD came from Sinai and dawned over them from Seir; he shone forth from Mount Paran. He came with myriads of holy ones from the south, from his mountain slopes. ​

    See also Deu. 32 where Moses reminds the Israelites of their foolish ways that resulted in the 40 year journey & the death in the wilderness of those delivered from Egypt.
    32:32 “Set your hearts on all the words which I testify among you today, which you shall command your children to be careful to observe—all the words of this law. 47 For it is not a futile thing for you, because it is your life, and by this word you shall prolong your days in the land which you cross over the Jordan to possess.”
     
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  12. Van

    Van Well-Known Member
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    NET Bible:
    3:5 Plague goes before him; pestilence19 marches right behind him.20
    Footnotes:
    19tn Because of parallelism with the previous line, the meaning “pestilence” is favored for רֶשֶׁף (reshef) here, but usage elsewhere suggests a destructive bolt of fire may be in view. See BDB 958 s.v.
    sn There are mythological echoes here, for in Canaanite literature the god Resheph aids Baal in his battles. See J. Day, “New Light on the Mythological Background of the Allusion to Resheph in Habakkuk III 5,” VT 29 (1979): 353-55.
    20tn Heb “goes out at his feet.”
     
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  13. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    NKJV Study Bible (2007, Nelson, p. 404, 1863) includes the following notes. The Old Testament Editor is Ronald B. Allen, Th.D, Dallas Theological Seminary. The General Editor is Earl D. Radmacher, Th.D, Western Conservative Baptist Seminary.

    Habakkuk 3:5 (p. 1863)
    "pestilence...fever: These plagues are personified as messengers of judgment (see Deut 28: 21-22)."

    Deut. 28:21, 22 (p. 404)
    "Plague refers to devastations from pestilence and contagious diseases. Consumption ... burning fever: The diseases cannot easily be identified, but they have in common a fever or inflammation of body organs."
     
    #13 Just_Ahead, Mar 16, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2020
  14. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    The Moody Bible Commentary (NASB, 2014, p. 1393) includes the following note written by Michael Rydelnik.

    Habakkuk 3:5
    "Elements of divine punishment like pestilence and plague appear in several OT books and call to mind God's judgment on Pharaoh at the exodus (cf. Ex 7:14-12:30)."
     
  15. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Zondervan, 2016). O.T. study notes by John H. Walton, O.T. Editor, Ph.D. 1981, Hebrew and Cognate Studies, Hebrew Union College Institute of Religion, Cincinnati, Ohio; M.A. 1975 Biblical Studies: O.T. Wheaton Graduate School; A.B. 1974 Economics/Accounting, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA.

    Habakkuk 3:5 (p. 1540)
    "Plague...pestilence. Yahweh goes forth accompanied by a retinue of forces, including beams of light as well as the destructive elements mentioned here (cf. Dt 33:2). Some have interpreted pestilence and plague in this verse as living creatures since at least the second one is found as a divine name in Canaanite contexts. Some Ugaritic texts describe Baal as having attendants, and Akkadian texts describe Marduk accompanied by other gods who go before and behind him. A similar depiction is also found in the Mesopotamian epic 'Erra and Ishum,' where Erra, a god of war and plague, has seven minor deities as his companions, each of whom contributes to the devastation of the lands he chooses to attack. Similarly in Dt 32:23-24 the calamities heaped on a disobedient people by Yahweh include arrows (comparable to the metaphor for the fever brought by the plague-god Rashaph), pestilence and plague."

    Footnotes in John H. Walton, General Editor, Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary, Vol. 5, 2009.
     
  16. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    NIV Study Bible (2011, Zondervan). Kenneth L. Barker, General Editor.

    Habakkuk 3:5 (p. 1524)
    "Plague...pestilence. Means of divine punishment (cr. Ex 7:14-12:30; Lev 26:25; Ps 91:3,6)."
     
  17. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    NIV Zondervan Study Bible (2015, Zondervan). D. A. Carson, General Editor, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Ph.D., University of Cambridge. Elmer A. Martens, notes on Habakkuk, Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary, Ph. D., Claremont Graduate University.

    Habakkuk 3:3-15 (p. 1837).
    "Report of God's Coming (Theophany). The poetic account of God's appearance may restate what Habakkuk had heard (v. 2), the stories of exodus and conquest as suggested by "plague" (v. 5), and the standing still of the sun and moon (v. 11); or Habakkuk may be relating a personal visionary experience, one he was instructed to record (2:2). God approaches the battle scene, surveys the situation, and engages in battle to deliver his people. Divine appearances disturb nature (cf. Exod 19:16-25; Judg 5:4-5, 20-21; 1 Kgs a9:11-18; Ps 18:7-15). Not only is the Lord in full control of nature and nations, but he is powerful enough to overcome opposition of whatever kind."
     
  18. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    NIV Quest Study Bible (2011, Zondervan). Marshall Shelley, General Editor, Christianity Today.

    (Habakkuk 3:5)
    Why boast about plague and pestilence? (p. 1383).
    "Egypt enslaved and oppressed Israel. Eventually God used plagues and pestilence to free the Israelites. Habakkuk praised God for the plagues that overpowered the ironfisted Egyptians (Ex 7:8-11:10). In this case, plague and pestilence on their oppressors meant freedom and deliverance for the Israelites."
     
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  19. Just_Ahead

    Just_Ahead Active Member

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    NIV Storyline Bible: Each Story Plays a part. See How They Connect. (2019, Zondervan).

    A short essay on the Message of the Prophets (Israel Era 4) appears on p. 1077-1078. Includes a short bibliography for further study.

    This study bible follows the BibleMesh Curriculum and divides the Bible text into the following Eras.

    Emmanuel A. Kampouris is the founder and publisher of BibleMesh and the retired Chairman and CEO of American Standard, a North American manufacturer of plumbing fixtures, sold under the American Standard, Crane, Fiat, Sanymetal, and Showerite names, based in Piscataway, New Jersey, United States.

    Era 1: Creation
    Era 2: Patriarchs
    Era 3: Moses
    Era 4: Israel
    Era 5: After Exile
    Era 6: Jesus
    Era 7: The Church
     
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  20. rlvaughn

    rlvaughn Well-Known Member
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    John Gill:
     
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