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How is this different than US policy?

Discussion in 'Political Debate & Discussion' started by billwald, Sep 5, 2010.

  1. billwald

    billwald New Member

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    Anyone who thinks the Ten Commandments should NOT be enforced as civil law . . . would NOT want to live in a country where the Ten Commandments were enforced, raise your hand and tell us. Maybe some could write a poll.


    from http://www.alternet.org/story/14801...ious_defense_of_killing_non-jews_(with_video)

    If that doesn't work, www.alternet.org will

    As soon as it was published late last year,Torat Ha'Melech sparked a national uproar. The controversy began when an Israeli tabloid panned the book's contents as "230 pages on the laws concerning the killing of non-Jews, a kind of guidebook for anyone who ponders the question of if and when it is permissible to take the life of a non-Jew." According to the book's author, Rabbi Yitzhak Shapira, "Non-Jews are "uncompassionate by nature" and should be killed in order to "curb their evil inclinations." "If we kill a gentile who has has violated one of the seven commandments… there is nothing wrong with the murder," Shapira insisted. Citing Jewish law as his source (or at least a very selective interpretation of it) he declared: "There is justification for killing babies if it is clear that they will grow up to harm us, and in such a situation they may be harmed deliberately, and not only during combat with adults."
     
  2. Don

    Don Well-Known Member
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    I'm not getting it. How is this like US policy?
     
  3. billwald

    billwald New Member

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    The part about killing people who might be dangerous to a nation in the future.

    The part about enforcing God's Law in civil law. Is that a good idea?
     
  4. Don

    Don Well-Known Member
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    Murder is a capital offense. Stealing is a criminal offense.

    The question really is, where do you draw the line?
     
  5. billwald

    billwald New Member

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    Murder is a sub set of criminal offenses. Homicide is legally a human death that is not natural or accidental. Murder is a sub set of homicide. In Washington State a homicide can be excusable (most self defense homicides) or justified (most shootings by police).
     
  6. Don

    Don Well-Known Member
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    So whether you nitpick about how murder fits into the legal system - aren't we already enforcing God's law in civil law?
     
  7. billwald

    billwald New Member

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    When's the last time we stoned a person for adultery? Stoned anyone? There was a moral reason God specified stoning - the entire community took the responsibility.
     
  8. Aaron

    Aaron Member
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    Yes. Every statute is a society's enforcement of natural or common law, i.e., the law of God.

    The only thing in dispute is which god? Is it Jehovah, Baal, or man?
     
  9. Don

    Don Well-Known Member
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    So a jury of 12 fellow citizens make the decision, ensuring that the community is still involved. Would you prefer we go back to stoning?
     
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