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I am lucky to be alive!! Got hit by a car..

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by evangelist6589, Feb 6, 2012.

  1. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589 Well-Known Member
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    Match 15 is the date.
     
  2. Michaelt

    Michaelt Member
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    I haven't ridden much since I shattered my arm in 2009, but hoping to get back riding again this spring. I'd have to agree with others on here that a sidewalk is not a safe place to ride with pedestrians and especially vehicles pulling out of driveways or into driveways for that matter.

    Even some of the bicycle paths around a couple city parks are teaming with walkers and it makes navigating the paths difficult sometimes, especially those who have Ipods or other devices in their ears and don't hear a cyclist approaching from behind. I've seen a number of spills with that scenario.
     
  3. Squidward

    Squidward Member

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    I'd say it doesn't read that way. It probably states that bikes cannot be on walks and any accidents involving a bike on a walk will automatically be the fault of the biker. Had you been on the right lane on the road then you are in the right.
     
  4. gb93433

    gb93433 Active Member
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    I did and the drivers were uncomfortable. One time I went six miles in about seven minutes. It was always the most rewarding on a day when I would have a strong headwind. What was funny is how some would try to lose me. On one occasion a bus driver did on a level straight stretch of road. Earlier he had tried on a curvy section that was downhill. The only reason why I could not hang on was because I ran out of a high enough gear and he had to speed to go fast enough.
     
  5. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589 Well-Known Member
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    Cars drive about 50mph on Pleasantberg drive, there are 4 lanes and no bike lane exists. No one in their right mind would get on that road with the drivers. This is common sense.
     
  6. annsni

    annsni Well-Known Member
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    That sounds like our Jericho Turnpike which I've ridden on plenty of times. Yep, it's scary but do-able!! Heck, it's the only way for many of the Hispanics can get around unfortunately!!

    Here's a picture of the main intersection of Jericho Turnpike near our Home Depot - where I'd bike past: http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1008/4728110258_63664f5f3a.jpg
     
    #46 annsni, Feb 7, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 7, 2012
  7. Squidward

    Squidward Member

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    Yeah, that would stink. Seems like a bike lane would somehow be accomodated barring it wouldn't involve a ton of construction.
     
  8. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589 Well-Known Member
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    I'd rather be safe than sorry. As mentioned no one in their right mind would egt on that road. I have yet to see a single biker ride on that road. I will ride my bike on other roads, but not this one. In SF I rode my bike on city streets there, but cars did not travel as fast, and there were bike lanes.
     
  9. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589 Well-Known Member
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    The only way they would make one is after someone called killed, and they were sued. Sadly this is always what needs to happen before the city would get their act together.

    In 1997 I remember a certain intersection very badly needed a light as I had several close shaves with cars on that road. I complained but no one would listen. Then after some serious accident happened and someone got sued, the city made a light for that intersection. This is always what needed to happen.
     
  10. Oldtimer

    Oldtimer New Member

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    That's the problem. It does involve a lot of construction dollars.

    I don't know about other places, but around here many heavily traveled roads have been widened as much as is reasonably possible to increase the number of traffic lanes. Cost would be sky high to convert sidewalks to bike lanes and then acquire the property needed to replace the public sidewalks. That's the city situation. Out in the country, road shoulders often have steep drop offs that would have to be filled in order to add a bike path. And/or have cuts through hills that would have to be blasted again to add a few more feet of width to accomodate bikes. Plus all the work needed for bridges that are too narrow for separate bike traffic, too.

    NC is beginning to make highways toll roads in addition to all the fuel taxes being paid for road maintenance and construction. There's only one place to get the dollars that would be needed to add bike paths. That's the general public's pockets who drive vehicles and pay fuel taxes.
     
  11. Squidward

    Squidward Member

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    Down here in deep southern IL there is an old railroad bed that runs for around 50 miles that's been converted to a bike path. Many parts of it are concrete, most of it is gravel, but it's a cool ride from what I hear. Goes through the rolling hills of the Shawnee forest including a tunnel or two and some bridges. It's more for leisure than transportation though.
     
  12. MNJacob

    MNJacob Member

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    I was trying to figure out where you were. I didn't realize that you were right here in Greenville.

    Take the lane. I know that it may sound counter intuitive but you are safer in traffic than you think. Many times a four or five lane road is much easier for a bicyclist to effectively navigate than a two lane road.

    You are much more likely to be hit by a car on a sidewalk than in the street.

    What specific traffic regulation were you cited for? I can't find anything in South Carolina traffic code that would make you responsible for being hit by a car on a sidewalk. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for police officers to make citations in error based on a misunderstanding of how the applicable statutes should be applied. There could be a local regulation that prohibits riding bikes on the sidewalk.

    Make sure that you go to court. Make sure that you understand the citation.
     
    #52 MNJacob, Feb 8, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 8, 2012
  13. matt wade

    matt wade Well-Known Member

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    That's the truth, but there will be no convincing evangelist6589 of it. His mind is made up already.
     
  14. Michaelt

    Michaelt Member
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    That is so true...our local bicycle club in Arkansas puts it on their website and facebook page to stay off of sidewalks as much as possible. There are a couple places in Little Rock where riding on the sidewalk is necessary, but they are short distances and not many pedestrians walk there anyway. They are hoping that the city will soon connect the two bike paths already in place to bypass the busier street and stay off the sidewalks.
     
  15. windcatcher

    windcatcher New Member

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    I suspect that these laws related to bicycles and sidewalks originated with the idea of protecting pedestrians..... and a cyclist moving fast can be very intimidating especially to a pedestrian who may also have limited ambulatory ability to move quickly. Pardon, but this does not address the issue... although it might speak to the interest of someone doing a study.
    Also, I'm wondering about the accuracy of stats concerning accidents by cyclist in traffic vs cyclists on sidewalks. (I noticed that no stats were quoted... just mentioned as though an established fact.) Included in this vein wondering .... who gathers these stats, what information is included or excluded (which might be pertinent), and is there a bias connected with the collection of these facts in the surveyors, the survey, or the funding..... and is there a cross reference which shows either a disconnect or reliable connection between regions and development which makes a generalization acceptable or not. Also, how is this study funded ...... and does the motivations of the funders and the outcomes looked for influence in anyway the analysis.

    A person with just a little common sense may see that there's perhaps a wider variance of bikers than there is of vehicular drivers on the road..... and thus a wider range of needs if these are to be addressed. A novice or a child on a bike, just learning... does not need to be on the street competing with traffic when he is learning or not suitably able to control the bike nor has he develop the skills of experience and observation to "read" the traffic and be consciencious of the hazards. The competitive bike racer... on the other hand... may have both skills and observation... but will not get his practice in safely if confronted constantly with hazards of curbs, fire-hydrants, trees, broken sidewalks, drive-ways and turning traffic, pedestrians, etc. .

    Unfortunately, when there's a law.... there's only the responsibility to obey it or submit to the consequences... or get involve in a challenge to get it overturned or adjusted.

    So... my opinion will not count: However, imo, the purpose of the law is not to assign risk but to set boundaries with-in which most persons have a reasonable assurance that their rights and interest (i.e. life/property) is protected from trespass by the rights and liberties of others. Chances are that if the accident had not occurred and the police not been involved, you would not be cited, even if the police patrolling the area saw you. (This assumes also that no one observing you biking on the sidewalk called in a complaint or offense.) And chances are that had this occurred in a public road-way... or public parking lot, the driver might have also been cited for some failure to observe before backing, recklessness, etc. .

    The fact that most drivers have insurance means that ... if they are not cited or a blatant cause of accident, even their insurance coverage will fight for them to prevent a payment towards claims.... in most cases. This driver may be helped by the fact that, according to the law in that area (check this out) you were not lawfully where you should be while biking.

    Strangely enough, had you been walking your bike across his drive-way.... he would most likely have the full responsibility of seeing and avoiding you. Although I still see this as the driver of the car having the lion's share of responsibility for this accident... still the court may not see it that way: They may see that had you not been where the law required you weren't supposed to be, the driver of the car would have made the necessary and obligatory observations before entering the street.... and avoided you.

    Personally, I hope you recover quickly... physically, emotionally, and economically. Maybe you can perceive this as a blessing in disguise.... You ARE vulnerable on a bike. On or off the road, you must be observant at all times... just like driving on the road. A parked car with a driver is likely to move... when you may not expect it. So many run quietly that you may not hear them. Who was at fault or who gets a ticket doesn't matter if you're dead.... or disabled. imo, I'd rather see most bikers on the side-walk instead of in the narrow bike lanes that are painted: I've just seen too many inexperienced bikers using these painted in restricted lanes.... and that also goes for motorist who venture into these lanes for whatever reasons (like distractions, merging, and turns.... or avoidance of other's side ways intrusions).

    May God go with you!
     
  16. annsni

    annsni Well-Known Member
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    I believe had one been walking on the sidewalk, they would have had the time to see a car backing out of the driveway. But when biking, they cannot have the time to see a car backing down and then avoiding the car. I can easily stop when I see a car backing down the driveway and let them get out when I'm walking but when I'm biking or driving, I don't have time to respond like that - to stop in one step.
     
  17. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589 Well-Known Member
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    Yeah right….. I aint taking no lane on that road. I just wont drive there as Ia m not safe. I am not sure if you have ever ridden a bike, but not a single biker whom rides in this area whom I have spoken with is gonna take that lane on that road. Later..
     
  18. matt wade

    matt wade Well-Known Member

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    I've looked at google maps for Pleasantberg drive in Greenville and I don't see any issues with biking on that road. I've ridden on roads similar to it many times in the past and I know bikers that ride on roads like that every day of their lives.

    The facts are simple (whether you accept them or not). Studies and statistics show that a bicycle on the road, following the proper traffic laws, is safer than one on the sidewalk.

    You can clearly see where riding on the sidewalk got you, right?

    If you are incapable of following the law, then don't ride your bike.
     
  19. annsni

    annsni Well-Known Member
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    I know people who have ridden across the country - all on roads. As a matter of fact, my wheels have been across the country 4 times!! LOL Yes, I bought my wheels from a guy who rode across the country 4 times. My bike is a racing bike and needed to replace my sew-ups and with tubes so now I have regular rims. But the fact of the matter is that none of us - the guys who did the cross country trips, me who did all of the trips around New England and the guys I know recently who rode from Florida to Maine EVER rode on sidewalks. If they did, they walked their bikes. It's just downright unsafe to do otherwise. Yes, on some roads you need to be careful and ride very much on the right side of the road and need to make sure you keep an eye open but it's still safer than riding on the sidewalk.
     
  20. Jkdbuck76

    Jkdbuck76 Well-Known Member
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    Glad that you are alive, Evangelist. Getting hit by a car is NOT fun.
     
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