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Is your church a 501-C

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Salty, Feb 23, 2021.

  1. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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  2. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell Well-Known Member
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    There are so many things wrong with that I dont know where to start. Ill deal with it later. Disappointed in ole chuck.
     
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  3. rlvaughn

    rlvaughn Well-Known Member
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    No. We have never been, and never have seen any need to be. At the same time, we are not overly worried about what others decide to do about this. I have not read yet what Chuck Baldwin says about it.
    Is Liberty Fellowship an organization (like an association or convention) which other churches can join, or just the name of Baldwin's congregation in Kalispell?
     
  4. Reformed1689

    Reformed1689 Well-Known Member

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    Churches are automatically tax exempt in the United States regardless if they have sought formal recognition from the IRS.
     
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  5. JonC

    JonC Moderator
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    I think if a church is going to adopt a business model, if they are going to be a business type of an organization, then they need to be the best business they can be. There are needs a business organization will require that may not be necessary if the church was limited to an assembly or congregation of believers (they will need income for salaries, for facilities and facility maintenance, for programs, for audio-visual equipment, etc.). I see no reason for them not to be a non-profit organization as this will save monetary resources. If the church is an assembly of believers, then perhaps becoming a 501-C is unnecessary. So I guess it depends on the organization of each individual church.
     
  6. Reformed1689

    Reformed1689 Well-Known Member

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    Again, a church is not required uner IRS regulations to apply for 501c3 status. They are automatically recognized as tax exempt.
     
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  7. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    In NY State to be exempt from sales tax - you do have to apply for the exemption
     
  8. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell Well-Known Member
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    They are but 501c3 gives the church members corporate legal protections. Individual church members cant be sued for liability issues unless there is individual misconduct.
     
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  9. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    Our church is INC in NY State, we have a 501c - and it has not caused us any problems. And as RevMitchell stated - it protects the members from lawsuits - esp the pastor and the trustees

    We also have the State Sales exemption status - but we have a member who works at Walmart - and anything he buys - he gets a 10% discount - which is a better deal since the tax is only 8%!
     
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  10. Reformed1689

    Reformed1689 Well-Known Member

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    That is for incorporating which is not the same as 501c3.
     
  11. Baptist Believer

    Baptist Believer Well-Known Member
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    No. We are one of God's outposts for the fellowship and service for the Kingdom of God.

    We have 501c3 status, as a non-profit religious group (specifically, a church), but that does not define us in anyone's eyes except for the IRS.
     
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  12. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell Well-Known Member
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    Nope the 501c3 is incorporating. And it does offer those protections.
     
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  13. Baptist Believer

    Baptist Believer Well-Known Member
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    As Revmitchell wrote:
    He's right. It is massively flawed. In fact, we are all made less informed by reading it.

    The legal analysis here is laughable to anyone who knows anything about Constitutional law.

    I was baffled how an attorney of any level of competence would present information like the article, "The 501(c)(3) Incorporated Church 'Down and Dirty.'" I looked at the "Broef Biography of Barbara Ketay at the bottom of the page and was surprised to see that she "attended Chase Law School" in Cincinnati and "Blackstone School of Law" in Chicago. There's nothing said about her completing any study program or whether or not she passed the state bar. So I did a little checking...

    The "Chase Law School" she "attended" (I wonder if that was auditing or just hanging around the campus), is a legitimate and reputable school -- The Salmon P. Chase College of Law. The second institution, and it's carefully worded to not place the word "attended" next to "Blackstone School of Law," is now known as the 'Blackstone Career Institute,' and now offers distance education/home study instruction. But prior to that (before 1948), it was essentially a diploma mill:

    Barbara Ketay (deceased since 2016) graduated the University of Cincinnati in 1979, and it would seem she made contact with the "Blackstone School of Law(sic)" after that time. Since the FTC made that institution change its name in 1948, it appears that Ms. Ketay was being less than forthright about her legal credentials. And since her legal analysis is a disaster, I think it is safe to say that any viewpoint built on this nonsense argument is completely invalid.
     
    #13 Baptist Believer, Feb 23, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2021
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  14. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    BB - thanks for the legwork!
     
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