1. Welcome to Baptist Board, a friendly forum to discuss the Baptist Faith in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to all the features that our community has to offer.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon and God Bless!

N Carolina wants a State Religion

Discussion in 'Political Debate & Discussion' started by Salty, Feb 27, 2014.

  1. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Messages:
    22,727
    Ratings:
    +663
    Faith:
    Baptist
  2. thisnumbersdisconnected

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2013
    Messages:
    8,448
    Ratings:
    +1
    That sounds like the first shot fired across the bow in a secessionist movement. Wow!

    You know there is the basis for a "new confederacy" formed up already, don't you? It's called the Southern National Congress. North Carolina is a member, along with 13 other states including Missouri, Maryland and Texas. It encompasses the entire Southeast(ern Conference, too, as it happens :laugh: ). Interesting.
     
  3. OldRegular

    OldRegular Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Messages:
    22,678
    Ratings:
    +80
    I agree that the 1st Amendment as it addresses the establishment of religion applies only to the US Congress but I don't want any state establishing a state religion.
     
  4. preachinjesus

    preachinjesus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Messages:
    7,406
    Ratings:
    +182
    Baptists, historically, have always opposed the establishment of a state religion, whether regional or national. Part of the historic belief in religious liberty is that no primary belief is forced upon others.

    It might seem nice for a while, but it always damages in the long run.
     
  5. Crabtownboy

    Crabtownboy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Messages:
    17,385
    Ratings:
    +636
    Faith:
    Baptist
    I disagree, the amendment was aimed at both the Federal government and state governments. The establishment clause comes from the push by the Virginia Baptists who had suffered greatly under the established Virginia State Church ... the Church of England. They wanted it impossible for a state church to ever be established by anyone.

     
  6. thisnumbersdisconnected

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2013
    Messages:
    8,448
    Ratings:
    +1
    Jefferson didn't think so. His "wall of separation" letter that is so widely and incorrectly used to justify the erroneous "separation of church and state" arguments was directed to the Connecticut Baptist Association, telling them the federal government could not intervene in their dispute with the state of Connecticut over the state church there. The Baptists were protesting the state's insistence that the Baptist churches conform to the Connecticut church's doctrines, formulae, and procedures. Jefferson replied that the federal government could not intervene in a state matter:
    The problem is, the founders only wrote that Congress could "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." It said nothing about the states, nor does it say anything about preventing religion from being vocalized or promoted publicly. Several court decisions since 1947 have defied that fact and illegally extended the First to be used against faith, religion, and their practices.

    It is amusing to note that Jefferson's reference to "Separation of Church & State" is a reference to the feds inability to intervene in a state matter. It has nothing to do whatsoever with faith or religion having an active role in American government.
     
    #6 thisnumbersdisconnected, Feb 27, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 27, 2014
  7. Squire Robertsson

    Squire Robertsson Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2000
    Messages:
    9,974
    Ratings:
    +911
    Faith:
    Baptist
    Crabtown, the Congregational Church was the established chirch of the Commonwealth of Massachusettes until the 1840s. IIRC, of the 13 original states only three didn't have an established church.
     
Loading...