Name That Figure of Speech

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by John of Japan, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. Rob_BW Well-Known Member
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    Lol, I thought it was a hyperlink. I just can't get it right today. :(:Biggrin
     
  2. agedman Well-Known Member
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    Well, get a diet Dr Pepper to get you awake before you get started. :)
     
  3. agedman Well-Known Member
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    And your point is as related to the thread?
     
  4. agedman Well-Known Member
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    Do you happen to know if the Scriptures ever mix or blend the figures of speech to even being as a mixed metaphor?

    I can’t think of any, but perhaps they are still written.

    For those who might be wondering, mixing metaphors is typically used to bring humor.

    For example, Rush Limbaugh once said (if I recall correctly), "I knew enough to realize that the alligators were in the swamp and that it was time to circle the wagons."
     
  5. JPPT1974 Member
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    Not a Rush but that was indeed a funny saying over alligators and swamp!
     
  6. Rob_BW Well-Known Member
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    Like Numbers 11:1a?

    And it happened, the people were like those who complain of hardship in the hearing of Yahweh, and Yahweh became angry,

    in the hearing is literally in the ears

    became angry is literally His nose became hot
     
  7. SheepWhisperer Active Member

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    Did I miss something? I thought "Lying down in green pastures" was figurative and not literal? No?
    What about "laying a cornerstone" and "shutting up the sea with doors"?
     
  8. Martin Marprelate Well-Known Member
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    What Jerome said, I think, though I struggled with No. 4.
     
  9. Martin Marprelate Well-Known Member
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    Indeed it doesn't, but the fact that so many instances of 1,000 are used figuratively should cause one to ask why one particular instance is literal.
    I don't think this follows at all. There is no reason why it should. In fact 1,000 occurs 3 times in the Song of Solomon, (4:4; 8:11, 12), but I doubt that any of them are literal.

    Having made these points I will not interrupt your thread again.
     
  10. John of Japan Well-Known Member
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    Yeah, Song of Solomon in two completely different chapters on three different subjects. Rev. 20: six times in only six verses. Not a good comparison.
    Not a problem, since you are actually trying to prove something to be a figure of speech. I'd be happy if someone else commented on your theory.
     
  11. John of Japan Well-Known Member
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    Okay, several have taken the quiz, and we are now on p. 2, so I'll point out that Jerome had all the right answers. Kudos! Good job, Jerome. :)

    If someone still wants to take the quiz, they can now just take it while avoiding Jerome's post.
     
  12. John of Japan Well-Known Member
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    Those would be idioms and not metaphors.
     
  13. Martin Marprelate Well-Known Member
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    I preached on 2 Timothy 1:12 recently. It contains a litotes and an anacoluthon.
    A litotes affirms something by denying the opposite: 'I am not ashamed,' meaning, 'I count it all joy!' (James 1:2).
    An anacoluthon is an understatement: 'I am persuaded,' meaning, 'I am absolutely sure.'
     
  14. John of Japan Well-Known Member
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    Excellent post for this thread. Thanks!
     
  15. Rob_BW Well-Known Member
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    Definitely easier to find "mixed idioms" than "mixed metaphors."
     
  16. Covenanter Well-Known Member
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    Is this a figure of speech? If so what?

    Jeremiah 33:17 “For thus says the LORD: ‘David shall never lack a man to sit on the throne of the house of Israel; 18 nor shall the priests, the Levites, lack a man to offer burnt offerings before Me, to kindle grain offerings, and to sacrifice continually.’”
     
  17. John of Japan Well-Known Member
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    Well, you'll have to tell me, because I see no standard figure of speech in there. Plus, you've given two whole verses, and a figure of speech only takes one (metaphor) to several (idiom) words, except for the parable (an extended metaphor).
     
  18. agedman Well-Known Member
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    Could not a parable also be a Simile or even others?

    For example: "The kingdom of heaven is like a ..." (simile)

    For example: "The one who has seen me has seen the Father..." (Anthropomorphism)

    Would all cases in which a human physical item being used to describe God (hand, mouth, breath, eye, hair, ear) or sense (see, hear, taste, ...) be anthropomophisic ?
     
  19. John of Japan Well-Known Member
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    Sure it could. I just used the phrase I had been taught.

    I'll have to think about this one. It's unclear to me that Jesus meant this statement to be a figure of speech.

    I would say yes. "God is a spirit," so any physical representation of the Father or Holy Spirit would have to be an anthropomorphism.
     
  20. Covenanter Well-Known Member
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    The problem I am concerned with is the fact that that promise is of an eternal Davidic monarchy, & Levitical sacrificing priesthood.

    At the time of the prophecy Zedekiah was king on David's throne, the temple was standing, & priests were functioning. The exile had begun, partially, & Jeremiah wrote to the exiles advising the 70 years. Soon after Jeremiah's prophecy, Jerusalem was destroyed, including the temple, & Zedekiah was captured & his sons slain.

    When the prophesied return took place, Zerubbabel, the governor in David's line & his descendants never became king, & high priest Joshua didn't have a temple. And there were lots more prophecies, but "never lack a man" hasn't begun in 2,600 years, & no Levitical priest has offered a sacrifice in 1,950 years.

    BUT - in the context, the prophecy focuses of the Messiah, the LORD Jesus Christ, King, Priest & Prophet. He is clearly the fulfilment of the prophecy by his saving work completed by his ascension to his heavenly throne.

    However, you premils are waiting, waiting, waiting, while Israel continues in rejection of its Messiah. And when he does come, the prophesied eternal state which never ends will only last for a millennium at the end of which all hell breaks loose.

    Seemingly "never" didn't begin in the Law dispensation & nor did "never" begin in the Church dispensation, despite the best efforts of the LORD Jesus Christ. And despite the re-establishment of the nation of Israel in the millennium, "never" will end, because there will no temple in the NH&NE.

    Apply the topic -

    The figure that speaks of a never ending Davidic monarchy;
    & the figure that speaks of a continuing Levitical priesthood;
    is typology or "pattern prophecy"
    those offices are figures of the eternal ministry of the LORD Jesus Christ.

    Have YOU an answer to the language of prophecy that promises a wonderful fulfilment that NEVER happens?