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National Guard and Medicare

Discussion in 'Political Debate & Discussion' started by Salty, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    Costs of Medicare are sky rocking!

    Suppose National Guard and/or Reserve medical units were to man a "sick call" clinic during their annual training and/or monthly drill.
    The military personnel would be able to provide basic medical care to those in need. In addition the GI's would be able to receive valuable training. Sitting in a classroom is fine, but preforming your actual MOS in a "real world" situation is much more effective.

    Would it save the govermnet money? Rember we have to pay the troops anysways?
    Thoughts?
     
  2. billwald

    billwald New Member

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    Use national guard troops to staff community health clinics? People generally don't go to a clinic for first aid.
     
  3. Don

    Don Well-Known Member
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    It's the same principle as "free clinics" that exists now. You open it up for one weekend a month, provide flu shots, triage-type examinations, etc.

    You'd have to reconcile medical supplies, of course.
     
  4. Jason Garrett

    Jason Garrett New Member

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    Although a great idea in theory, the purpose of national guard medical units is to maintain the readiness of the servicemembers themselves in the event of deployment. This means a constant state of readiness. On a typical drill weekend, Guard medical units spend up to 10-12 hours per day running medical clinics for the actual service members, doing health screenings and treatment, dental screenings and treatment, the review and update of medical records which require constant vigilance to maintain their readiness to deploy, and the task of conducting training for themselves to maintain their own readiness to treat others and do their own jobs effectively.

    Having the Guard and reserves treat the population in general is a good pie in the sky solution to some of the ailments which plague our society in regard to medical care for all, but practically speaking it is not feasible.
     
  5. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    That would be true for medical units that are assigned to a division, Bridge or Bn. However there are medical units who are "independent" and actually may be assigned to an active duty unit for mobilization. These are the units I am talking about.
    While I am at it, I'm sure a unit could always spare a medic or two for the the "MAFCMP" -Military Assistance for Civillian Medical" Program.
     
  6. Jason Garrett

    Jason Garrett New Member

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    Sounds like your experience is with the Army or Marines by your use of those particular unit designators. I am not. My experience lies with the Air Force reserve and guard units, and in the air force medical units are all assigned to upper echelon level units with purpose and mission to service the entire entity.

    I don't feel sparing one or two here and there would make that big of a difference. Most of the poor and uninsured among us use hospital ER's as their PCP's due to no other options, and these hospitals are FAR better staffed and equipped to do what you're speaking of, and even they struggle.

    Again, I don't think it's feasible nor do I think it's their responsibility.
     
  7. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    Yes, I was Army. At Battalion level ( a unit of about 1,ooo troops, there are about a dozen medics which assist in initial first aid- if a condition calls for more treatment - we are then sent to the medical clinic or hospital

    I am not saying that using military personnel for civilian assistance is their responsibility - but it could assist the NG and Reserve individuals in sharpening their skills for military readiness, especially if they are not in a medical related civilian job. In fact, this might be perfect for un-employed vets/reservist.

    As with the Battalion aid station - it would strictly be a "first aid" stop. That way an individual would not have to visit the ER for a minor situation; thereby saving quite a bit on govt financed medical care.

    Just a thought
     
  8. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    So, do you think this is a way to save some govt $$$?
     
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