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Reformed theology

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by CarlandBeth, Jun 13, 2014.

  1. CarlandBeth

    CarlandBeth New Member

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    Good morning...I was wondering what is the definition of reformed theology? I always thought those who are reformed are always amill....I must be confusing preterism with reformed.

    Thank you!
    Beth
     
  2. RLBosley

    RLBosley Active Member

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    In the other thread I said that reformed theology, referring to soteriology, doesn't affect your end times views. So that everyone can have context here is what I said initially:

    What I meant by this is that the Doctrines of Grace/5 points of Calvinism do not affect your end times views. A lot of the time people say "Reformed" or "Calvinism" when they mean that someone's soteriology (doctrine concerning salvation) is the Doctrines of Grace. That's why I specified soteriology in my original post. In that sense, Reformed doesn't always mean amill. That's why I pointed out John MacArthur, he is a Calvinist, but he holds to a form of dispensationalism. I also am Reformed in this sense, and I am not amill, but tentatively hold to historic premill.

    If you mean "Reformed" in the more historic sense, meaning the full system of Calvinism and Covenant Theology, then yes I would say virtually all would be Amill, with a few Posties for varieties sake.

    Make sense?

    Also, Preterists are usually postmill, not amill, in my experience. YMMV.
     
    #2 RLBosley, Jun 13, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 13, 2014
  3. CarlandBeth

    CarlandBeth New Member

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    thank you!

    I appreciate your response, and love learning something new....actually, I wasn't really sure what soteriologically meant!
     
  4. kyredneck

    kyredneck Well-Known Member
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    Iron sharpens iron. That's what makes this an excellent place to learn 'IF', and that's a great big 'IF', one is indeed a student of the word.
     
  5. RLBosley

    RLBosley Active Member

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    You are very welcome. Sorry the terminology left you behind. I didn't mean to do that.

    I assume you know what I mean by the Doctrines of Grace/5 points of Calvinism, correct?

    Yes, very true.
     
  6. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    While the theology was always around.....it was not system at ized until after the reformation. ..The printing press helped this to happen. So the reformers attempted to set things right....which is where the word reformed concerning theology comes from.
     
  7. JamesL

    JamesL Well-Known Member
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    Soteriology and eschatology are joined at the hip. Jesus came not only to save us from hell, but also to save everyone, believer and unbeliever, from bodily death. We will all be raised, some to eternal life and some to judgment. So the bodily resurrection, an end time issue, is an issue of soteriology.

    Also, for believers, He did not only come to save us unto heaven, but unto adoption as sons and an inheritance, which is also an issue of eschatology. But it is only by being conformed to His image (through picking up our cross) that one becomes a son and joint-heir. Our inheritance comes at the end, but only because of His death.

    . the Reformed position diminishes both of these because it confuses entering the Kingdom with inheriting the Kingdom, and also refuses the biblical position that it is only by Christ's sacrifice that unbelievers will be raised to judgment.

    Believers must be raised bodily before we inherit the Kingdom of God, and it is only byway of His suffering that both of these happen. And both the resurrection and our inheritance are called "salvation" in the New Testament. Soteriological indeed.

    Disconnecting Eschatology from Soteriology displays a misunderstanding of both
     
    #7 JamesL, Jun 13, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 13, 2014
  8. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Active Member
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  9. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1 Well-Known Member
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    To reformed, in the strict sense/meaning of the term, all Calvinists would be those who ascribe to the entire system proper, to Covenant theology, whilr some like myself see being a Calvinist would be best defined in the sense of how one views their Sotierology...
     
  10. CarlandBeth

    CarlandBeth New Member

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  11. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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  12. CarlandBeth

    CarlandBeth New Member

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