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That pesky title of Reverend

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Salty, Aug 5, 2022.

  1. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    On another current thread about what to call a Priest
    has recently turned into using the title of Reverend.
    How do you address a priest?

    Over the years there has been some discussion about Reverend.
    In fact, some of our BB members use Rev in their user name


    1) "Reverend" as a title

    2) Please call me Reverend

    3) Is it wrong to refer to a man as "Reverend?"

    4) Men whom call themselves "Reverend"


    Many will say that Psalm 119:11 states: "He sent redemption unto his people: he hath commanded his covenant for ever: holy and reverend is his name. (KJV)

    NJKV & NASV, CEV, NIV.... Holy and awesome is his name
    Gods Word.... His name is Holy and terrifying
    NLT...... What a holy, awe-inspiring name he has!
    CSB......His name is holy and awe-inspiring.

    Lets consider this:
    Psalm is a Book of poetry - it is a Book of Wise sayings
    and as such they are not directives (ie -Thou shalt not bear false witness)

    Vs 9 - in the KJV states "reverend" -
    according to Strongs - one meaning is: to fear, reverence, honour, respect

    and likewise we should honor and respect our ordained clergy.
    (Yes, I realize there are some exceptions!)

    Now, I do use the Title of Rev - but am I comparing myself to God Himself?
    OF COURSE not - the position I hold demands that respect - and it is my duty
    to uphold such standards.

    On some of the links above - some have said that in church, folks call each other,
    even the pastor by their first name. Makes me think of a radio show I hosted one night.
    The title was "What is Americas # Number One Problem" As I came on the air -
    the answer I gave was "Lack of responsibility and respect"
    Part of that belief is my time in the Army - I would always call an NCO as "Sergeant" and
    referred to officers - by their Rank or "Sir". In addition - we would always salute officers.
    That salute is a sign of respect and greeting them in peace. Sadly, especially in civilian life
    I do see large lack of respect.

    On the other had - I do not demand that I be addressed as Rev. This is especially true
    in non-religious situations - ie - I am on the county committee for my political party. While at a
    Party meeting we just address each other by our first name. Now, when we had a fund-raising
    dinner - I was asked to give the invocation - in the program, I was listed as Rev (Salty)

    Now, a couple of other things.
    1) I do not like to be referred to as "THE Rev (Salty)
    If a medical doctor was on the program - would they print "The Doctor Smith"

    I don't care for the term "layman"

    Psalm 111:9 is the only reference to this in the Bible
    So the basic question is: Does the Scripture prohibit the use of the term "Reverend"
    Open for discussion
     
  2. JonC

    JonC Moderator
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    "Reverend" is the Protestant equivalent to the Catholic "Father".
     
  3. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    What would you base that on?
     
  4. JonC

    JonC Moderator
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    They are the same (not linguistically but in usage).

    The Catholic title "father" indicates reverence. The Protestant title Reverend is the same and serves the same purpose (to separate the "father" or "reverand" from the laity by elevation).

    It is a Protestant form of Catholic piety.
     
  5. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    I just dont see that!


    From Wiki:
    The term is an anglicisation of the Latin reverendus, the style originally used in Latin documents in medieval Europe. It is the gerundive or future passive participle of the verb revereri ("to respect; to revere"), meaning "[one who is] to be revered/must be respected". The Reverend is therefore equivalent to The Honourable or The Venerable. It is paired with a modifier or noun for some offices in some religious traditions: Lutheran archbishops, Anglican archbishops, and most Catholic bishops are usually styled The Most Reverend[3] (reverendissimus); other Lutheran bishops, Anglican bishops, and Catholic bishops are styled The Right Reverend.[4]
    Link:
    The Reverend - Wikipedia
     
  6. JonC

    JonC Moderator
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    What does "father" mean in the Catholic usage?

    [The] term “father” being used as a form of address and reference, even for men who are not biologically related to the speaker.
     
  7. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    Some say not to use Reverend as that can be confusing to some:
    because Psalms says: only god in reverend

    Well,



    [​IMG] 1Pe 1:16

    Because it is written, Be ye holy; for I am holy.
     
  8. 37818

    37818 Well-Known Member

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    Matthew 23:8, ". . . all ye are brethren. . . ."
    A Scofield Reference Bible note:
     
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