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Election of Sen Tim Scott

Discussion in 'Political Debate & Discussion' started by Salty, Sep 28, 2023.

  1. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    Info from Wiki

    Republican Primary – 2010 1st Congressional District of South Carolina[126]
    Party Candidate Votes %
    Republican
    Tim Scott 25,457 31.5
    Republican Paul Thurmond 13,149 16.3
    Republican Carroll Campbell III 11,665 14.4
    Republican Larry Kobrovsky 8,521 10.5
    Republican Stovall Witte 7,192 8.9
    Republican Clark B Parker 6,769 8.4
    Republican Katherine Jenerette 3,849 4.8
    Republican Mark Lutz 3,237 4.0
    Republican Ken Glasson 1,006 1.2
    Total votes 80,845 100
    Turnout
    24.1


    Republican Primary Runoff – 2010 1st Congressional District of South Carolina[127]
    Party Candidate Votes %
    Republican
    Tim Scott 46,885 68.4
    Republican Paul Thurmond 21,706 31.7
    Total votes 68,591 100


    The Results of the R- primary gave Scott 31% of the vote,
    thus a run-off was required.
    80,000 : The total votes cast in the original primary totaled
    60,000 In the runoff - some 10,000 + did not vote
    10,000 +folks chose not to vote in the Runoff

    Hmmm, I wonder why?

     
  2. KenH

    KenH Well-Known Member

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    Lots of people will vote in a primary but not in a runoff. Lots of those who voted for someone other than the top two candidates lose interest or don't care to take the time to vote again so soon, There is generally very low turnout in a primary compared to a general election. There is even less turnout in a runoff than in a primary. There is even less turnout in school board elections and such compared to the number of eligible voters.

    Turnout by eligible voters is not exactly sterling in the United States. I don't castigate anyone for not voting, as I have had to work on convincing myself to go vote in the last several general elections, and I used to be a political junkie.
     
  3. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    There should be NO excuses for not voting!
    I believe it is our RESPONSIBILITY to vote.
    We love to complain about our govt -
    but what are we doing about.
    Step one is to vote!
     
  4. KenH

    KenH Well-Known Member

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    Yes, there are. As an example, here's one:

    David Lipscomb quoting B.U. Watkins in Lipscomb’s book, On Civil Government: Its Origin, Mission, and Destiny, and the Christian's Relation to It.

    “One of the signs of the great Apostacy, was the union of Church and State. Its chosen symbol was a woman upon the back of a seven headed and ten horned beast. It is almost uniformly admitted, among American Protestants, that this is a well chosen symbol to represent the absurd, and unnatural union of Church and State. It is generally conceded, that the woman represents the Church, and the beast the old Roman civil government. This being true, it would appear far more natural for her to be riding the beast, than for him to have his locomotion promoted by the help of the woman! When the State comes forward and proffers its assistance, and the Church voluntarily accepts of such help, it might be a question, which would be the most to blame; the Church for accepting, or the State for offering such assistance. But when the Church gives, unasked, her power to the beast, no excuse can reasonably be pleaded. If the State supporting the Church, is called an adulterous union, I am unable to see, why the union is not equally intimate, and criminal, when the Church supports the State, by participating in all its responsibilities. When the Church offers her fellowship, and co-operation in framing all the laws of the land, and in choosing its judicial and executive officers - when even her members refuse not to become legislators, and are even forward to fill all the offices of human governments, I cannot see, but the relation between church and State, is as intimate as ever, and just as illegal. Ezekiel chided the ancient Hebrews for seeking such union with the nations; and he compares Israel to a woman of the lowest infamy. It is exceedingly painful to me, to see how aptly these symbols of John and Ezekiel apply to modern professors. But how greatly would I rejoice, if the reformation of the 19th century would arise and put on her beautiful garments, and show herself to be the true spouse of Christ. May the good Lord grant that this noble brotherhood, that I so dearly love, may soon see the whole truth! But here, I am met with the objection, that these institutions are ordained of God. And he who resists them resists an ordinance of God, and shall receive punishment. Let me here pause, and remark, that I would sooner be understood as taking the popular view of this passage, rather than appear to countenance any kind of war. Nothing is further from my intention. But the fact of civil government being ordained of God, is no proof of Divine approbation. So long as it can be clearly shown that he has ordained that one sinner should punish another, so long as we read in Isaiah, that Cyrus was sent against Babylon, although he knew not God, so long as we find it not difficult to admit the application of the above passage, to civil government, whether such be its meaning or not. To make the admission saves much time, and leaves the argument much more compact. Something is gained and nothing lost by granting all we can to our opponents. That God can overrule sin, without being responsible for its commission, and without having any complicity with it, is a thing so plain, that to turn aside to explain it would almost be an insult to those for whom these columns are written. Let a hint suffice. Pharaoh was raised up by God for a certain purpose, although his behavior was far from being approved of God. With a few axioms I will close this article. Axiom 1st, No man has the right of making laws for his own government. For such a right would include the double absurdity of making him independent of God, and responsible only to himself! Axiom 2nd. A republican government is one in which power is thought to be delegated by the people to their rulers, in their act of voting. Axiom 3rd. But a man cannot delegate a power he himself does not possess. Hence, INFERENCE 1st. As man has no inherent legislative power, he cannot transfer it to another. Hence, INFERENCE 2nd. Voting is therefore a deception, and a sham, making a deceiver of him, who votes, and a dupe of him who fancies himself the recipient of delegated power.”
     
    #4 KenH, Sep 28, 2023
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2023
  5. KenH

    KenH Well-Known Member

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    I do not. It is a right granted by government, not a responsibility.

    At this point in time, if Christ has not returned yet to establish the new heavens and earth wherein dwells righteousness and God has not called me out of this cesspool of a sinful world, then there is a huge chance that I won't vote in November 2024. But, as I have over the past several elections, I might yet, once again, talk myself into the voting.
     
    #5 KenH, Sep 28, 2023
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2023
  6. JonC

    JonC Moderator
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    Sure there are. I don't vote.

    There are good reasons to vote.
    There are good reasons to abstain from voting.

    Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind.
     
  7. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    Guess we disagree.

    So, does that mean you never complain about the govt?
     
  8. KenH

    KenH Well-Known Member

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    One does not have to vote to complain about Leviathan.
     
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  9. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    You can complain - but the first question, I will ask is "Did you vote:
    if the answer is "NO" then there is no reason to continue that conversation!
     
  10. KenH

    KenH Well-Known Member

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    I disagree. Voting to not be ruled by the Republican or Democratic Parties is a valid option. They will rule anyway, but by voting, one is giving one's assent to them doing so.
     
  11. JonC

    JonC Moderator
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    I believe that each Christian needs to follow their conscience when it comes to matters not prescribed by Scripture.

    My hope is that those who abstain still register to vote and abstain on biblical principle while remaining educated (rather than ignorance or laziness).

    My hope is that Christians who do vote do so to represent Christ with their vote (not merely for self-interest).

    But most of all I hope that a believer does not sin by acting against their conscious (whether with their vote or by abstaining).

    Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind.


    No, just because I do not vote does not mean I don't complain about the government.

    There are several reasons:

    1. If a soldier stops complaining then something is wrong. ;)

    2. I am a citizen regardless of whether I choose to participate in the election process.

    3. Unlike most citizens, you and I have (IMHO) earned our citizenship through service and have a right to speak about the nation we served to defend.


    But it does mean that my complaints are as one who is in the world but not a part of it. I complain as an outsider.
     
  12. JonC

    JonC Moderator
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    There is something said by registering but not voting. It says that I could vote but believed there was no party that represented me.

    People sometimes forget that we have a number of registered voters regardless of whether they participate in an election.

    For me, it is a message to the GOP and DNC that I am worth more than they are offering. :)
     
  13. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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