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Sacred Space

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Iconoclast, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    This imagery of perfection and fullness becomes more significant when the Garden of Eden is recognized as a sanctuary – as the garden of God. Ezekiel’s prophecy is again helpful (28:11-19), for in this passage the prophet specifically refers to Eden under this title (cf. also 31:1-9; Isaiah 51:3). The phrase, “garden of God,” could mean simply the garden planted by God, but other considerations indicate that it should be taken to mean the garden that is God’s dwelling place.

    First of all, the creation narrative has God walking back and forth in the Garden, and the grammar suggests His familiar presence there. This sense is reinforced by Adam’s and Eve’s ejection from Eden. Their disobedience brought estrangement, and the text spotlights their spiritual separation from God by noting their expulsion from God’s garden, enforced by His attending cherubim (Genesis 3:8, 22-24, cf. 4:16; also Isaiah 2:2-3; 2 Thessalonians 1:9-10; Revelation 22:14-15).

    Furthermore, the language and imagery of Eden are employed and developed throughout the Scripture in reference to appointed places where God dwells with His people.
    So it was with Canaan (cf. Exodus 3:8 and Joel 2:1-3 with Exodus 15:11-17, 25:1-8)

    and the temple (1 Kings 6:18ff; 7:18ff),

    and so it is with the new creation (Isaiah 4:2-6, 51:3, 65:13-25, 66:18ff; Jeremiah 31:1-12; Ezekiel 36:33-36; Hosea 2:14-23; Amos 9:11-15; cf. Revelation 21:1-3 with 22:1-19).

    Do you agree with this statement from Kit Culver?

    If you do not agree, why?
     
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  2. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    Yes Iconoclast....I agree with Pastor Culver even here;
    Sacred Space and the Eternal State
    The consummate kingdom is the full realization of sacred space – God with us. This
    creational destiny was first portrayed in Eden and then made a matter of promise at the
    time of the Fall.
    Later, it was realized prototypically in Israel
    and then in actuality in Christ.
    In the present age the kingdom as sacred space is being manifested in the Church,
    but in the last day it will reach its consummation when the Spirit transforms the entire
    creation. Then, as the whole created order is at last “summed up in Christ,” the Creator-
    Father will have brought about the consummate fullness of sacred space.

    In that day John’s final vision will have been fully realized: The new heavens and earth
    as the renewed creation, the Church as the Bride, and the New Jerusalem as the sanctuary
    and throne of God and the Lamb will together constitute sacred space; in that day, God
    will forever be “all in all” (1 Corinthians 15:25-28).
     
  3. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    Did he offer anything leading up to this conclusion? Could you show some of it?

    Okay;


    Separation from the Lord in condemnation is further described as being outside.
    This imagery is important in that it introduces the concept of locale and implies
    the existence of an “inside” reserved for those whom Christ receives to Himself. It
    is in this regard that the theme of sacred space comes to the forefront in the final
    judgment and its outcome, and it appears under three related images.


    - The first is the image of the kingdom of God, and it notably has particular
    reference to the sons of Israel. They, rather than the Gentiles, lived in the
    hope of the promised kingdom, and so it was appropriate that Jesus
    explained the outcome of their disbelief and rejection of Him in terms of
    their being cast out of God’s kingdom (ref. again Matthew 8:1-12, 21:33-
    43, 22:1-13; Luke 13:22-30). In context, to be “cast out” is to be cut off
    from the presence and fellowship of Yahweh and His King.


    - The second is the image of a wedding feast (Matthew 22:1-13, 25:1-12;
    Luke 14:15-24; Revelation 19:1-9; cf. also Luke 13:22-30; John 3:22-29).
    Those who refuse the master’s invitation or arrive without the appropriate
    garments will be left outside, unable to partake in the celebration.


    - The notion of “outside” finds its pinnacle expression in the imagery of the
    New Jerusalem (Revelation 21:23-27, 22:14-15; cf. Hebrews 12:18-24).
    As with its typological counterpart, the heavenly Jerusalem signifies the
    place of God’s dwelling and the seat of His throne. Therefore, to be
    outside the city – which is illumined by the Lord’s presence – is to be in
    outer darkness away from Him.


    All three set forth a place/realm into which some men enter while others are left
    outside. The indication in every instance is that “inside” or “outside” pertains to
    every person; there is no third option. Moreover, each of these realms speaks to
    sacred space in that they emphasize the presence of the Lord/master and His
    communion with those granted entrance.
     
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