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The Function of the Law in the New Covenant

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by Reformed, May 1, 2018.

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  1. JonShaff

    JonShaff Fellow Servant
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    Sorry brother, you do not get it.

    There is nothing wrong with QUoting the OT if you understand the Context in which it was spoken--and how it is to be seen under the NT lens.
     
    #181 JonShaff, May 4, 2018
    Last edited: May 4, 2018
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  2. 1689Dave

    1689Dave Well-Known Member

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    ““Indeed, a time is coming,” says the Lord, “when I will make a new covenant with the people of Israel and Judah.It will not be like the old covenant that I made with their ancestors when I delivered them from Egypt. For they violated that covenant, even though I was like a faithful husband to them,” says the Lord.“But I will make a new covenant with the whole nation of Israel after I plant them back in the land,” says the Lord. “I will put my law within them and write it on their hearts and minds. I will be their God and they will be my people.” (Jeremiah 31:31–33) (NET)


    “For if that first covenant had been faultless,
    no one would have looked for a second one.But showing its fault, God says to them, “Look, the days are coming, says the Lord, when I will complete a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah. “It will not be like the covenant that I made with their fathers, on the day when I took them by the hand to lead them out of Egypt, because they did not continue in my covenant and I had no regard for them, says the Lord. “For this is the covenant that I will establish with the house of Israel after those days, says the Lord. I will put my laws in their minds and I will inscribe them on their hearts. And I will be their God and they will be my people. “And there will be no need at all for each one to teach his countryman or each one to teach his brother saying, ‘Know the Lord,’ since they will all know me, from the least to the greatest. “For I will be merciful toward their evil deeds, and their sins I will remember no longer.” When he speaks of a new covenant, he makes the first obsolete. Now what is growing obsolete and aging is about to disappear.” (Hebrews 8:7–13) (NET)

    The TEN Commandments ARE the Old Covenant the New Covenant replaced them.


    In Exodus 34:28 we read:
    “And He (God) wrote upon the tables the words of the covenant, the Ten Commandments.”

    Deuteronomy 4:13:
    “And He declared unto you His covenant, which He commanded you to perform, even the Ten Commandments.”

    Deuteronomy 9:9:
    “When I was gone up into the mount to receive the tables of stone, even the tables of the covenant.”

    Deuteronomy 9:15:
    “So I turned and came down from the mount . . . and the two tables of the covenant were in my two hands.”


    And so on...................
     
  3. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1 Well-Known Member
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    No, my aim is to please God, so would not using His Moral law as a standard to uphold be pleasing to Him?
     
  4. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1 Well-Known Member
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    A day of the week, as paul stated to us in 2 Corinthians, set aside to worship the lord!
     
  5. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1 Well-Known Member
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    We are not saved by the Law, for its by grace alone and faith alone, but the saved can then obey God as to His Moral law!
     
  6. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1 Well-Known Member
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    When we are walking per the Holy Spirit, and he is empowering us, will we not be then obeying the commands of God for our lives?
     
  7. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1 Well-Known Member
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    Do you desire to break the laws of God then?
     
  8. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1 Well-Known Member
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    Actually the 10 Commandments were the revealed Moral law of God unto us, and that predates even Adam being created!
     
  9. Reformed

    Reformed Well-Known Member
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    I would be careful with this wording. Obviously, the eternal God knew every aspect of His Law before it was ever instituted. However, theologians refer to the Mosaic Law being inaugurated at Sinai. The moral law was inaugurated at the creation of Adam and more specifically when God told Adam and Eve not to partake of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.
     
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  10. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1 Well-Known Member
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    Good correction, as I meant that the Moral law was in play for God before he gave the law to Moses at Sinai... Adam and Eve needed an objective moral standard that they would know as being of and from God!
     
  11. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    No...we can continue in part 2
     
  12. Martin Marprelate

    Martin Marprelate Well-Known Member
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    Absolutely! God's law is written on the hearts of His New Covenant people. Not a word here of that law suddenly being abolished and 'love' being put in its place.
    When are you going to realise that the Commandments are based on love? A loving God knows what's best for us, and lovingly gives us His righteous laws to follow. It is unconverted people who look at the Moral Law and see a load of "Thou shalt nots." God's people declare, "For this is the love of God, that we keep His commandments. And His commandments are not burdensome" (1 John 5:3).

    The Old Covenant is not the Ten Commandments. As I have shown, the Commandments pre-date the Sinaitic Covenant, and, of course, the O.C. included the ceremonial, dietary and judicial laws. One might as well argue on the basis of Exodus 31:16 that the Sabbath is the Covenant.
    It will be helpful if we look at the preceding verse. 'Then the LORD said to Moses, "Write these words, for according to the tenor of these words I have made a covenant with you and with Israel......' 'These words' are Exodus 34:10-26. Moses was to write these down. Then God re-wrote the Decalogue which was also contained within the covenant.
     
  13. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    Sabbath Rest
    by Sinclair Ferguson

    The anonymous author of Hebrews found different ways of describing the superiority of the Lord Jesus Christ. One of them, which forms the underlying motif of chapters 3 and 4, is that Jesus Christ gives the rest that neither Moses nor Joshua could provide. Under Moses, the people of God were disobedient and failed to enter into God’s rest (3:18). Psalm 95:11 (quoted in Hebrews 4:3) implies that Joshua could not have given the people “real rest” since “through David” God speaks about the rest he will give on another day (Heb. 4:7). This in turn implies that “There remains a sabbath rest for the people of God” (Heb. 4:9).

    In speaking of this rest (3:18; 4:1, 3-6, 8) the author consistently used the same word for “rest” (katapausis). Suddenly, in speaking about the “rest” that remains for the people of God, he uses a different word (sabbatismos, used only here in the NT) meaning specifically a Sabbath rest. In the context of his teaching, this refers fundamentally to the “Sabbath rest” which is found in Christ (“Come … I will give you rest,” Matt. 11:28-30). Thus we are to “strive to enter that rest” (4:11).

    Since Augustine, Christians have recognized that the Bible describes human experience in a fourfold scheme: in(i) creation, (ii) fall, (iii) redemption and (iv) glory. We are familiar with echoes of this in the Westminster Confession of Faith (chapter 9) and in Thomas Boston’s great book Human Nature in its Fourfold State. It is no surprise then that the Sabbath, which was made for man, is experienced by him in four ways.

    In creation, man was made as God’s image—intended “naturally” as God’s child to reflect his Father. Since his Father worked creatively for six days and rested on the seventh, Adam, like a son, was to copy Him. Together, on the seventh day, they were to walk in the garden. That day was a time to listen to all the Father had to show and tell about the wonders of His creating work.

    Thus the Sabbath Day was meant to be “Father’s Day” every week. It was “made” for Adam. It also had a hint of the future in it. The Father had finished His work, but Adam had not.

    But Adam fell. He ruined everything, including the Sabbath. Instead of walking with God, he hid from God (Gen. 3:8). It was the Sabbath, Father’s Day, but God had to look for him!

    This new context helps us to understand the significance of the fourth commandment. It was given to fallen man—that is why it contains a “you shall not.” He was not to work, but to rest. Externally, that meant ceasing from his ordinary tasks in order to meet with God. Internally, it involved ceasing from all self-sufficiency in order to rest in God’s grace.

    Considering this, what difference did the coming of Jesus make to the Sabbath day? In Christ crucified and risen, we find eternal rest (Matt. 11:28-30), and we are restored to communion with God (Matt. 11:25-30). The lost treasures of the Sabbath are restored. We rest in Christ from our labor of self-sufficiency, and we have access to the Father (Eph. 2:18). As we meet with Him, He shows us Himself, His ways, His world, His purposes, His glory. And whatever was temporary about the Mosaic Sabbath must be left behind as the reality of the intimate communion of the Adamic Sabbath is again experienced in our worship of the risen Savior on the first day of the week&mdash the Lord’s Day.

    But we have not yet reached the goal. We still struggle to rest from our labors; we still must “strive to enter that rest” (Heb. 4:11). Consequently the weekly nature of the Sabbath continues as a reminder that we are not yet home with the Father. And since this rest is ours only through union with Christ in His death and resurrection, our struggles to refuse the old life and enjoy the new continue.

    But one may ask: “How does this impact my Sundays as a Christian?” This view of the Sabbath should help us regulate our weeks. Sunday is “Father’s Day,” and we have an appointment to meet Him. The child who asks “How short can the meeting be?” has a dysfunctional relationship problem—not an intellectual, theological problem—something is amiss in his fellowship with God.

    This view of the Sabbath helps us deal with the question “Is it ok to do … on Sunday?—because I don’t have any time to do it in the rest of the week?” If this is our question, the problem is not how we use Sunday, it is how we are misusing the rest of the week.

    This view of the Lord’s Day helps us see the day as a foretaste of heaven. And it teaches us that if the worship, fellowship, ministry, and outreach of our churches do not give expression to that then something is seriously amiss.

    Hebrews teaches us that eternal glory is a Sabbath rest. Every day, all day, will be “Father’s Day!” Thus if here and now we learn the pleasures of a God-given weekly rhythm, it will no longer seem strange to us that the eternal glory can be described as a prolonged Sabbath!
     
  14. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    Sabbath Rest
    by Sinclair Ferguson

    The anonymous author of Hebrews found different ways of describing the superiority of the Lord Jesus Christ. One of them, which forms the underlying motif of chapters 3 and 4, is that Jesus Christ gives the rest that neither Moses nor Joshua could provide. Under Moses, the people of God were disobedient and failed to enter into God’s rest (3:18). Psalm 95:11 (quoted in Hebrews 4:3) implies that Joshua could not have given the people “real rest” since “through David” God speaks about the rest he will give on another day (Heb. 4:7). This in turn implies that “There remains a sabbath rest for the people of God” (Heb. 4:9).

    In speaking of this rest (3:18; 4:1, 3-6, 8) the author consistently used the same word for “rest” (katapausis). Suddenly, in speaking about the “rest” that remains for the people of God, he uses a different word (sabbatismos, used only here in the NT) meaning specifically a Sabbath rest. In the context of his teaching, this refers fundamentally to the “Sabbath rest” which is found in Christ (“Come … I will give you rest,” Matt. 11:28-30). Thus we are to “strive to enter that rest” (4:11).

    Since Augustine, Christians have recognized that the Bible describes human experience in a fourfold scheme: in(i) creation, (ii) fall, (iii) redemption and (iv) glory. We are familiar with echoes of this in the Westminster Confession of Faith (chapter 9) and in Thomas Boston’s great book Human Nature in its Fourfold State. It is no surprise then that the Sabbath, which was made for man, is experienced by him in four ways.

    In creation, man was made as God’s image—intended “naturally” as God’s child to reflect his Father. Since his Father worked creatively for six days and rested on the seventh, Adam, like a son, was to copy Him. Together, on the seventh day, they were to walk in the garden. That day was a time to listen to all the Father had to show and tell about the wonders of His creating work.

    Thus the Sabbath Day was meant to be “Father’s Day” every week. It was “made” for Adam. It also had a hint of the future in it. The Father had finished His work, but Adam had not.

    But Adam fell. He ruined everything, including the Sabbath. Instead of walking with God, he hid from God (Gen. 3:8). It was the Sabbath, Father’s Day, but God had to look for him!

    This new context helps us to understand the significance of the fourth commandment. It was given to fallen man—that is why it contains a “you shall not.” He was not to work, but to rest. Externally, that meant ceasing from his ordinary tasks in order to meet with God. Internally, it involved ceasing from all self-sufficiency in order to rest in God’s grace.

    Considering this, what difference did the coming of Jesus make to the Sabbath day? In Christ crucified and risen, we find eternal rest (Matt. 11:28-30), and we are restored to communion with God (Matt. 11:25-30). The lost treasures of the Sabbath are restored. We rest in Christ from our labor of self-sufficiency, and we have access to the Father (Eph. 2:18). As we meet with Him, He shows us Himself, His ways, His world, His purposes, His glory. And whatever was temporary about the Mosaic Sabbath must be left behind as the reality of the intimate communion of the Adamic Sabbath is again experienced in our worship of the risen Savior on the first day of the week&mdash the Lord’s Day.

    But we have not yet reached the goal. We still struggle to rest from our labors; we still must “strive to enter that rest” (Heb. 4:11). Consequently the weekly nature of the Sabbath continues as a reminder that we are not yet home with the Father. And since this rest is ours only through union with Christ in His death and resurrection, our struggles to refuse the old life and enjoy the new continue.

    But one may ask: “How does this impact my Sundays as a Christian?” This view of the Sabbath should help us regulate our weeks. Sunday is “Father’s Day,” and we have an appointment to meet Him. The child who asks “How short can the meeting be?” has a dysfunctional relationship problem—not an intellectual, theological problem—something is amiss in his fellowship with God.

    This view of the Sabbath helps us deal with the question “Is it ok to do … on Sunday?—because I don’t have any time to do it in the rest of the week?” If this is our question, the problem is not how we use Sunday, it is how we are misusing the rest of the week.

    This view of the Lord’s Day helps us see the day as a foretaste of heaven. And it teaches us that if the worship, fellowship, ministry, and outreach of our churches do not give expression to that then something is seriously amiss.

    Hebrews teaches us that eternal glory is a Sabbath rest. Every day, all day, will be “Father’s Day!” Thus if here and now we learn the pleasures of a God-given weekly rhythm, it will no longer seem strange to us that the eternal glory can be described as a prolonged Sabbath!
     
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  15. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    AS IF HE DID NOT SAY IT AND DESCRIBE IT IN ROMANS 13????:Cautious
     
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  16. Squire Robertsson

    Squire Robertsson Administrator
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    This thread is closed.
     
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