2-year-old boy killed by pit bulls at baby sitter's house

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by Revmitchell, Sep 23, 2013.

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  1. Revmitchell

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    A 2-year-old Arizona boy has died after being mauled by a trio of pit bulls at his baby sitter’s house, police say.

    The special needs toddler and his four siblings were at the baby sitter’s house in Gilbert on Sunday morning when three of the dogs in the house began fighting, Fox 10 News reports.

    The dogs attacked the child after he got caught in the middle of the fight, and his 28-year-old baby sitter – whose name was not revealed – suffered cuts to her arms, legs and hands as she tried to pull the dogs off him, Gilbert police said.

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/09/2...cident-at-babysitter-house/?intcmp=latestnews
     
  2. Revmitchell

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    The breed should be wiped off of the face of the earth and the parents and sitter should be charged with involuntary man slaughter.

    Everyone knows that pits are a risk.
     
  3. Sapper Woody

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    Completely disagree. While pits are harder to reign in, a trained dog is still a trained dog. The parents should not be charged with anything, and I believe that your saying so is an emotional overreaction. Also, you've quickly passed judgment onto the sitter without knowing even half of the details. You only know one piece of information. There's a chance the sitter should be charged, but we just don't know with the information required.
     
  4. questdriven

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    This person has good info on pit bulls: http://kapieren.deviantart.com/art/Pit-Bull-Problem-265983028
    They're pro-pit, but also acknowledge that it isn't all happy happy sparkly rainbow crap like most pit bull apologists make it out to be. They advocate reforming the breed through better breeding. They say that that's what saved breeds like the German Shepherd and Doberman, which once had a bad rep as well.

    Me, I do like pits. I've known them to be very nice dogs. See them quite a bit down here. But I would not be the right person to own one. Terriers are super high energy and I couldn't handle that.
     
    #4 questdriven, Sep 24, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 24, 2013
  5. Revmitchell

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    Training doesn't matter. There are plenty of breeds that require no training not to be a risk. Pits are a risk no matter what. This kind of thing happens all the time with Pits. You never hear of it with collies or Labradors, etc. Anyone who owns a pit should know this and handle things accordingly. Parents should never drop their kids off with sitters who own pits. Period. It is to high a risk and everyone knows it. Failure to use caution with regards to children is automatically neglect.
     
    #5 Revmitchell, Sep 24, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 24, 2013
  6. Revmitchell

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    They are high risk dogs as well. Caution should be used equally with regards to children.
     
  7. Mexdeaf

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    We have a pit bull/dalmatian mix. We got her from a pound and she is one of the nicest dogs we have ever had. We've also had a rottweiler and a doberman, as well as several smaller dogs. Surprisingly, the most aggressive dog we had was a dalmatian- she was very protective of the wife and kids. But we never had any bite problems.

    There is a lot of truth to the saying that there are no bad dogs- there are just bad breeders or owners.
     
  8. Aaron

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    Actually, the breed owners need to be tried for murder and executed.
     
  9. Aaron

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    But if the ox were wont to push with his horn in time past, and it hath been testified to his owner, and he hath not kept him in, but that he hath killed a man or a woman; the ox shall be stoned, and his owner also shall be put to death.
    Ex. 21:9
     
  10. thisnumbersdisconnected

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    Pits are a product of their upbringing. If they are brought up in a way so as to promote their docile, happy side, they are the greatest dogs in the world, particularly around kids. If they are brought up as attack dogs (something done by drug dealers and gang members), that's what they become.
     
  11. Revmitchell

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    Even when pits are raised and trained in the best of circumstances they are still a risk.
     
  12. Mexdeaf

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    Brother, ANY animal you own is a risk. People have been killed by horses, cows, birds, cats, etc.

    [Before someone goes off half-cocked, birds and cats (among most other animals) carry diseases that have been known to kill humans. Doesn't make it any less risky.]
     
  13. thisnumbersdisconnected

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    Sorry, Rev, that's simply not true. It is their upbringing and environment, just like kids. Gang members and thugs aren't inherently violent, and neither are dogs. They have to be taught to be violent.

    Accept it or not, no difference to me. Just want to point out the truth.
     
  14. Revmitchell

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    It is true. There are no headlines that say Labrador mauls child.
     
  15. Bro. Curtis

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  16. questdriven

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    Actually, as a dog enthusiast who used to read up on dogs behavior and training for fun, I can tell you that any dog that is not properly socialized can have issues. There are other factors as well. Some breeds require experienced fog owners simply because of their energy level, level of stubbornness, etc.

    Most aggression is actually rooted in fear. A fearful dog may very well bite. It's pretty much the only way he can protect himself, after all.
    This is why thorough socialization is important. Ideally puppies should be socialized with as many people as possible. Most people don't realize this. It's surprising how ignorant some dog owners are on dog behavior, and this can lead to some unfortunate events.
    For example, many people will correct their dog for growling. This is a terrible thing to do. Growling is a warning, see. When a dog growls he is saying "please stop that, it makes me uncomfortable." If you correct this warning mechanism out of the dog, he's likely to go straight to biting. Without warning.

    A dog's behavior is a combination of genetics and how it was raised. Some breeds are more prone to aggression than others, but any dog is capable of it.

    I had a German shepherd up til about two years ago when she had to be our down due to old age and the issues that came with it. They tend to be one person dogs, and bond very closely to that person. Mine followed me around like a shadow. Great guard dog, too.
    I do think she probably hadn't been socialized well as a puppy. I worked with her on that and we made some headway. I was a teenager at the time, so in trying to socialize and 8 year old dog who barely left the house most of her life, I'd advise more caution than I employed. Luckily German shepherds are eager-to-please--or at least mine was. I think that's why I was able to make as much progress with her as I did. I was a teenage girl at the time who thought I was some kind of layman expert on dog training. I know now that I'm no expert. I just like to be informed on the animals I own so as not to cause more problems than necessary.

    My current dog is a sheltie/papillon mix. Little guy.
    I want another German shepherd one day, though.
    My dream dog is a smooth (shorthaired) blue Merle collie. I'm told that they actually have a similar temperament to shepherds. If that's true, that's awesome.
     
    #17 questdriven, Sep 24, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 24, 2013
  17. Aaron

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    What are the mauling stats of pits as opposed to poodles and other breeds not known to be aggressive?
     
  18. Gina B

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  19. questdriven

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    #20 questdriven, Sep 24, 2013
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