300 pounders in the NFL

Discussion in 'Sports' started by west, Aug 21, 2005.

  1. west

    west
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    In 1976 there was 1 player listed over 300 lbs in the NFL .This year there are 376 players listed over 300 lbs in the NFL wow good eaten .
     
  2. hamricba

    hamricba
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    In 1976 there was no such thing as a Double-Quarter Pounder With Cheese, either.

    That's about 12 wideloads per team.
     
  3. Mike McK

    Mike McK
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    We also didn't have players dropping dead in camp.

    Ron Jaworski made a good point in last night's Eagle's game.

    He said that, when he was the QB, training camp lasted ten weeks.

    Now, it lasts twelve days.
     
  4. webdog

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    Year 2036 there will be wide receivers over 300lbs.! :D
     
  5. TexasSky

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    And one of them died this weekend, immediately following a game. Does anyone in the pro-sports league really care about the health of these men?
     
  6. Jim

    Jim
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    The real problem is that the NFL has become a totally unhealthy experience for any lineman. When I played in HS in the mid 60's a big lineman was 230-250 lbs. Most were not body builder big, just overweight, much like Bob Ryan of the Boston Globe pointed out on ESPN this morning. I was a 165 lb guard and linebacker. That was fine as we ran the Green Bay offense, Sweep left and Sweep right and a couple of quick inside traps and usually won 7-0 or 14-10.

    I went to a small Baptist college in KS and had to get up to 195 to even think about playing. It was a good thing I was also a place kicker. All the linemen in 1966/67 were at least 250 lbs. Everyone just like me ran a 4.5 forty...the experience was totally different. It was clear that I was physically "not man enough" to play any more with these giants of men. A hard thing for most men to admit. We had three NAIA All Americans when I was there (Div 3 today). Dave Hale played with the Bears for three years, but could not get his weight up to the needed 300 lbs. Mass is what matters inside the ends today.

    I fear for the health of our high school football players as I could not play today with these linemen in HS now 300lbs. Our values in America are so skewed these days.

    Mike Lupica of NY Daily News said he is surprised it has only been so few who have died. The key will be more extensive cardio-vascular screening than ever before. All the young man wanted to do was buy his mother a nice house by playing football. He deserved a better fate for sure.
     
  7. WallyGator

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    My sentiments exactly. Too much weight not enough conditioning. Shucks, most leading college programs offensive interior linemen average over 300#.
     
  8. Mike McK

    Mike McK
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    That's what I mean.

    And now, they say that the sudden death of Reggie White some months ago was related to his weight.

    I remember watching William Perry when he played here in Philadelphia and just being shocked every time he got up.

    I don't mean to be cruel, but I really waited every game for him to clutch his chest and drop over.
     
  9. robycop3

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    The bottom line for the team ownership is *WIN*. They're always seeking any advantage they can gain over their opponents.

    I believe we all know it's the O-line that makes the team go, and if they can work a 400-pounder into the line they're gonna do it.

    A few years ago, some o-linemen went up against some Sumos at their sport, and were badly whupped. Conversely, when the Sumos suited up & tried to block the linemen from getting past a certain line for so many seconds, they were easily bested. And the Sumos generally outweighed the footballers. Just goes to show one must be trained...

    Much responsibility lies with the individual athletes to care for their own bodies. I believe we've all seen "undersized" linemen who did well for many years. The Packers of the '60s come to mind. As for taking care at oneself, look at Jim Marshall. He played a VERY long HOF career, then reduced to about 225 lb as he entered the legal profession.

    If a man's gonna bulk up to an unnatural 300 lb or greater to play a game requiring max exertion, he needs to use COMMON SENSE and prepare his cardiovascular system to handle the load.

    BTW, as of this AM, forensics hadn't determined the COD for Mr. Herrion.
     
  10. PastorSBC1303

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    The rising weight of football players is a concern.

    But let's not kid ourselves, people in every walk of life are getting bigger. I bet the number of 300 pound preachers is a lot more now than in the 1970s as well.

    So this is not just a "sports" problem, but a problem in our culture.
     
  11. LarryN

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    roby writes:

    Speaking of...

    There was an article about Jim Marshall in yesterday's Minneapolis Star Tribune:

    http://www.startribune.com/stories/503/5569875.html


    The article is about the huge physical toll that 20 seasons in the NFL has taken on his body.
     
  12. TexasSky

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    PastorSBC,

    I agree with you that it is a culture problem, however, churches are not encouraging people to achieve 300 lbs in order to block someone like coaches are.
     
  13. PastorSBC1303

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    Texas, atleast in the sports world there is some type of reason and purpose for doing it...even if it is wrong.

    While in the church it is just sort of overlooked. I am disgusted when I go to meetings, conferences, etc and it is just seen as the norm that pastors are to be fat, etc.
     
  14. WallyGator

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    PastorSBC1303,
    I've got some sore toes!
    But, I will have you know I'm down to 281# !
    WallyGator

    PS: Ok all you 300# preachers fess up.
    But, back in the 60's, my playing weight was 245.
     
  15. PastorSBC1303

    PastorSBC1303
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    [​IMG] :D [​IMG]
     
  16. west

    west
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    I heard that about the 300 pounders on ESPN's Sports Reporters .They also said that the average weight in 1968 was 245 .
     
  17. robycop3

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    I believe the human body has built-in limits about how much weight it can safely carry and how much heat or electrolyte depletion it can take. However, I believe that some men can become ADDICTED TO FOOTBALL! I know I was. Two of the saddest days of my early life was walking off my home HS field for the last time, and walking off the field in Morgantown after losing a close playoff game, knowing my HS football days were over forever, that someone else would be # 43 next year. I STILL WANTED TO PLAY FOOTBALL!!!(I received no worthwhile college offers, & we didn't have the money for me to go otherwise.) After 4 years in the Navy, I STILL wanted to play, so I joined a team in the Ohio Valley Football League, an old and respected semipro league. I shelled out over $300 for equipment, and away I went, living out my fantasy. I often came home looking as if I'd been on the short end of a long fight, but I didn't care...I WAS PLAYING FOOTBALL, doing quite well! I was making more tackles, making more key blocks, gaining more yards, scoring more TDs & 2-point conversions than I'd ever done in HS. Yes, I was thoroughly addicted to football!(I was never under any illusion that some pro team was gonna notice me & give me an invite. I knew I was too slow and lacked the finesse to be a pro, and had no expectations of playing pro whatsoever.

    Along the way, I got married & got saved. Then, as the years passed, I was bruising easier and healing slower, so after 10 years, I called it a "career". I no longer had the desire to play football after the last game of 1980; I walked off the field HAPPILY this time! Sold my equipment for $200 and became strictly a SPECTATOR. As my buddies left the OVFL, I soon quit following it.

    Having been there, seen it, done that, I can understand a little why some men sacrifice their future health to play football. I reckon that includes big men making themselves bigger than what they can safely carry, pushing themselves beyond exhaustion to show the coaches they're tough & in shape. Whether it's being addicted to football, or having dreams of making megabucks, there's plenty of drive to make men take all the risks.

    (BTW, I'm still quite a football fan. GO, Marshall Thundering Herd! Go, Bengals and 49ers! Go, Chesapeake, Ohio Panthers! Go, Wayne, WV Pioneers! Go, Ironton, OH Fighting Tigers! Go, Ashland, KY Tomcats![Except against Ironton!])
     

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