Abingdon Bible Commentary

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by Phillip, Mar 12, 2005.

  1. Phillip

    Phillip
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    I know this may be pushing the limits of the Versions and Translations section, but two reasons I am posting this here. Being a Commentary I think it is closely tied to translations and discussions and interpretations therefof. Plus, most of the scholars of Greek and Hebrew tend to hang out here more than at other places.

    Please tell me about the "Abingdon Bible Commentary".

    The one I have was printed in 1929 by "The Abingdon Press, Inc. and provides an extensive commentary of the entire Bible. It is large and thick, but not nearly as bulky as Mathew Henry's full Commentary, but more extensive than his concise commentary.

    It has a list of contrituros most of who are quite heavy with education and scholarly backgrounds.

    Who knows about this book and what are the philosophies behind it. What are the biases?

    Is it a good study book for the Bible. It has multiple maps, excellent index in the book and other resources. Each chapter says to read a certain section of the Bible and then it does a commentary on it. It has almost 1500 pages, but is not a huge book like the Mathew Henry's full, so it is quite easy to handle. Just thick.

    What's the story scholars?
     
  2. Phillip

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  3. Craigbythesea

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    The Abingdon Bible Commentary is published by Abingdon Press, an imprint of The United Methodist Publishing House, and is a liberal work. Your 1929 edition is the first edition. A second edition was published in 1957. Since the work is a liberal one, you will probably find the introduction portions more valuable than the very brief and almost useless commentary portions of the work.

    My first commentary on the whole Bible was a one volume commentary that I purchased used for $.25 in a thrift store. I used that commentary frequently for several months until I began acquiring commentaries on individual books of the Bible. I very quickly realized the need for the latter, and I began acquiring several of them for each of the books in the Bible. I soon became especially conscious of the need to have in my home library the very best exegetical commentaries available on each book of the Bible, and that took me into the subject of Old Testament and New Testament bibliography where I learned about each of the many publishers of commentaries, and what they published. I also had to learn who was who in Biblical scholarship, where they studied, what they believed, and what they wrote.

    Many books have been published on the subject of Old Testament and New Testament bibliography, especially New Testament bibliography, and these works are very helpful for the person beginning to put together a library for serious Bible study. A basic library for the study of the Bible involves more than a thousand volumes, and of course that involves a considerable amount of shelf space just for starters—and a considerable amount of money. Therefore the study of Biblical bibliography at the outset can help a person to avoid filling his home with hundreds of books that he will not need or use, and avoid the outlay of thousands of wasted dollars. It will also help him to know which books to pull off the shelf and which ones to leave there when an inquiry needs to be made on a passage in the Bible or any other Bible-related inquiry.

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