Ancestors in the Civil War

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by Arbo, Oct 3, 2011.

  1. Arbo

    Arbo
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    I am curious, after reading a recent thread about the Civil War, how many here have ancestors who were part of that conflict.

    If any of yours were, on which side were they and where did they participate?
     
    #1 Arbo, Oct 3, 2011
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  2. Crabtownboy

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    I had relatives on both sides. One was in a Virginia outfit ... I do not know the units number. However he died before there were an major battles.

    On the other side one of my great-grandfathers fought with the 25 Wisonsin Infantry. He was mustered in with the initial group on September 14, 1862 and was mustered out with the rest of the regiment on June 7th, 1865.

    The unit suffered 3 officers and 46 enlisted men killed in action or who later died of their wounds, plus another 7 officers and 402 enlisted men who died of disease, for a total of 460 fatalities. They were involved in:

    Siege of Vicksburg
    Battle of Kennesaw Mountain
    Battle of Atlanta
    Battle of Bentonville

    I have had relatives in every war from the Revolution to this day.
     
    #2 Crabtownboy, Oct 3, 2011
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  3. North Carolina Tentmaker

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    I had ancestors on both sides, more confederate than union, but some on both, and a few who actually served on both sides. One ancestor started out in the cavalry company of Smith’s legion and served there and then later in the 6th Georgia Cavalry, then late in the war enlisted in the 12th Tennessee Cavalry, a Union unit, where he served the final months of the conflict.

    More cousins and uncles than direct ancestors served, that is pretty common simply because those who perish in war are not left around to reproduce. One wing of my family was active in the abolitionist movement and moved from Kentucky to Indiana before the war. They served in Indiana regiments. Another wing lived in east Tennessee but were solid union supporters and served in Union regiments raised in Tennessee.

    As with all conflicts, some saw difficult action and others did not. One ancestor spent the war as a confederate sergeant making shoes in a factory in Columbus Georgia. I have one ancestor who died of illness two months after enlisting, others who died of pneumonia in the union prison camps at Rock Island Illinois and Elmira New York. Another who lost an arm May 3, 1862 at Chancellorsville but continued to serve until the end of the war and lived decades after.
     
  4. govteach51

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    I had ggg- granddads on both sides who fought for the Confederacy. They fought from New Mexico to Florida and all received a pension for their service.....the one you need to ask is about her ancestors is my wife. Her family would be Southern " Aristocracy." She had ggg-grandfathers who served as generals....How she wound up with the grandson of a corporal is beyond me> :tongue3:
     
  5. seekingthetruth

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    11th Alabama Infantry

    My uncles mustered with the Alabama 11th Infantry. I know the history of 3 of them. One went to a yankee prison camp in Ilinois where he died. One went to a yankee prison camp in Maryland. He was released after the war but died at home in Alabama just weeks later from pnemonia and malnutrition combined with continuous beatings. And the third was actually at Appomattox when Lee surrendered.

    My gggrandfather and every male adult not in regular units served with the Perry County, Alabama Home Guard.

    BTW, my family did not own slaves. They were fighting for the freedom to govern themselves through local government, not federal.

    John
     
  6. Salty

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    As was the case with most Southerners. Too bad our history teachers (esp in the North) do not teach the "rest of the Story of the War Between the States"
     
  7. David Lamb

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    Don't know for sure, but I believe that in The Civil War, some of my ancestors were on the Royalist side, and some were among Cromwell's Roundheads. :)
     
  8. Jim1999

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    England financially supported the South during the Civil War and monies were deposited in Montreal, Canada. Canadians actually served on both sides.

    The war did start over State rights, but eventually slavery was made an issue even though there was slavery issues in the North too.

    In Canada, the RCMP had to defend our borders because there were several attempts to invade Canada by the North, especially at BC and Niagara Falls where Irish Americans tried but were defeated rather badly by Canadian Militia.

    No relatives on either side that I am aware of.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  9. Winman

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    According to my mother who has done extensive research, we are related to Jefferson Davis. Her mother's maiden name was Davis.
     
  10. Earth Wind and Fire

    Earth Wind and Fire
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    Dont tell me that....no, no , no dont tell me that. That would mean your of Welsh linage....IE, Generations of Calvinists.....hahaha!:tongue3: WELCOME TO DA FAMILY! ROFL.
     
  11. DiamondLady

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    Yes, I do have an ancestor who served in the Union Army. I'm blessed to have copies of his paperwork, including pay vouchers and other items.

    I also have ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War, including one who was at Valley Forge with George Washington. I am proud to be a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution as well as working on my paperwork to join the Society of the Descendants of Washington's Army at Valley Forge.

    I enjoy working on our family genealogy....we are a part of what our ancestors were.
     
    #11 DiamondLady, Oct 18, 2011
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  12. revmwc

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    This was my GG-Grandfather my Grandmothers Grandfather:

    The death angel called G.W.B. Holder home Sunday March 27 th. 1932 at 1;40 a.m. Mr Holder was aged 86 years, six months and 21 days; was born Sept 4, 1845. and was united in marriage to Elizabeth Duckworth in 1866. Unto this union eleven children were born; six boys and five d aughters. Five children having preceeded him to the grave. Those surviving are; sons, J.W . Holder, Bay Springs, (my G-Grandfather) A. J. Holder, Laurel. J.R. Holder, Hattiesburg; the daughters Mrs. N. D. Rogers, Mt. Olive. married Charles D. Rogers; Mrs. T. W. Goas a of Greenwood, and Mrs. P.D. Rowe of St. Petersburg, Florida. Forty eight grandchildren 51 great grand children, four great great grandchildren and a host of friends.
    The deceased served as a Confederate soldier, having served in the years of 1863 to 1865. Company D. 9 Rigiment of Mississipipi under Capt. Ben Stephens. Later he was discharged at the end of the war in Meridian, Miss. Surrender papers of civil war, and death notice.
    Mr. Holder was born and raised in Jasper County, Miss. where he lived a true citizen until a few years ago when he moved to Covington county where he lived with a daughter, Mrs. N.D . Rogers of Mt. Olive, Miss. For the last sixteen years he was a patient at Beauvoir hospital at the Jeff Davis Soldiers home of Biloxi.
    The deceased became a member of the Methodist Episcoopal church, South. early in life and lived a true devout Christian life. Mr Holder was a man who never spoke disparagingly of his fellow man. It is said that he never dissapated in his life always living a consistent Christian life, loyal to his friends and his church.
    The funeral rites were held from the Methodist church Monday afternoon with Rev. J.W. Thompson officiating, assisted by Rev. W.O. Carter, the U.C.V. colors were draped about the casket during the ceremony. Internment was in the Bay Springs cemetery, Alexander Undertaking es tablishment in charge.
    Honorary pall bearers were Mr. Lovett, W.F. Thompson, J.B. Harper, W.BN. Ainsworth, T.H. Ainsworth, L.L. Denson, Sr., Henry McRay. M. Oates, Risher Holder, I.B. Arledge, S,F., Thigpen, F.D. Fail, R.R. Rogers, Sr . Sam Rogers, B.F. Thigeen, J.W. Smith. and Jack McDaniel, U.C.V. , Transcriber 1994. Ernest Holder, George Newman Holder, Georlge Eddins, Wilson Holder. C DR.

    Roll of Prisoners of War.
    Of divers companies and regiments (detached] of the Confederate States Army , commanded by Capt. D.H. Todd, surrendered at Citronville, Ala. by Lieut. Gen. R. Taylor, C.S. A. , to M aj. Gen. E, R.S. Canby, U.S.A. , May 4. 1865 and paroled at Meridian, Miss. , May 15, 1865 . Roll dated Meridian, Miss., May 15, 1865. Note ; This Company was formerly Company F, 17 th. Battalion Mississippi Calvary. The 17th Battalion Mississippi Calvary;, the 17th Battalion Tennessee Cavalry and Capt. C.A. Jennings Independent Company Mississippi Calvary were consolidated by R.O. No-----. Headquarters Calvary in Mississippi, dated December 24, 1863, to form a regiment which was known as Millers Regiment Mississippi Cavalry until designated the 9th Regiment Mississippi Cavalry by S.O. No. ---. A & I.G.O. dated Decembe r 24, 1864.
     
  13. revmwc

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    My GG-Grandfather my Dad's mothers side was a Baptist preacher living in Vicksburg Mississippi in the 1860's. The Story my Dad told was that this man went north into Illinois a town called Ullin and solicited the help of some church folks there. Seems there was a Cholera Epidemic or some type of epidmec in around 1863 or 64 and my gg-grandfather was able to get the ladies in Ullin to bake bread with medicine in it and have it barged down the Mississippi river to Vicksburg. My gg-grandfather sent a letter to his pregnant wife and told her if she had a son to name him Ullin after the town. Well the spelling was changed but my g-grandfather born 4 February 1864 was named Ullen and that was my fathers name too.
     
  14. Jim1999

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    Just as a point of interest, over 50,000 Canadians fought in the US Civil War!

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  15. revmwc

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    Well my Canadian ancestors were still living in Saint Francois Qubec during that time they migrated to the U.S. in 1870's.
     
  16. Winman

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    Not so, my mother and her parents were lifelong Methodists.
     
  17. Earth Wind and Fire

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    So were mine......Welsh Calvinistic Methodists. google it.
    Martyn Lloyd Jones was one also. Great people!
     
  18. Gwen

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    I have several ancestors who fought on both sides of the war. In doing genealogy research, I have found some very interesting stories, including one Confederate ancestor who was captured and put in a US prison, and then escaped from prison by switching uniforms with his brother (who fought for the US). His brother made him promise not to rejoin the war, and so he went home and did as his brother asked.
     
  19. Arbo

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    Similar stories as the maternal side of my family.

    Do you know what regiments? My Grandad's Great-Grandad served in the 17th Indiana Volunteers (one of the regs in Wilder's Lightning Brigade) beginning to end, was captured then paroled, was at Chicamauga and some other lesser-known fights in the Chattanooga/Atlanta area, and through the whole thing never was wounded.

    My Grandmother's Grandfather was also an abolitionist. He was killed because of it. The story is that a mob came to the house at night to shoot him, and he knew it. Rather than putting the family at risk by drawing fire into the house, he asked to be taken down the road out of sight. Grass still does not grow on the spot where he was gunned down.
     
  20. kyredneck

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    My 'clan' is from Eastern KY; one 'bunch' located in Clay County that I know to be in my family lineage all went Union, however, I googled my surname as related to the Civil War and it appears that about 2/3 of them overall fought for the South. I do know that there was some awful violence that occurred in the region during the war, and that many of the fueds that plagued the mountains of KY had their roots in the Civil War. In fact, it was a fued that eventually drove my father's immediate family from Lee County to where I was raised.
     

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