Any Andersonville Theological Seminary Grads Here?

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by Pastor Timothy, Jun 21, 2008.

  1. Pastor Timothy

    Pastor Timothy
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    Just requesting the thoughts of any Andersonville Theological Seminary Grads. How do you feel regarding your degrees? Did the school help you in your ministry? Did your degree from ATS help with being placed in a pulpit?

    Any thoughts or comments would be truly appreciated.
     
  2. webdog

    webdog
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    Plenty on Andersonville here, none too positive. Type in Andersonville in the search funtion.
     
  3. Martin

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    I thought there were and I was certain that they would answer your question. I don't know why they have not unless, and this could be it, this board is just going through a "down" time. Which is not a bad thing unless you want a question answered. I can't answer your first two questions since I am not in the ministry and I don't have a degree from Andersonville. However I can say something about your third question. Most Baptist Churches don't require a degree to be hired as a pastor. I know of several churches in this area that have pastors with degrees from Andersonville and Covington. That is not an endorsement of the schools it is just a fact. Before enrolling in any seminary you should carefully pray about God's will in your life. You should also talk with your pastor if you have not already done so.

    I do have a question, no strings attached: Why are you considering Andersonville? Have you considered a school like Luther Rice University?

    God bless you as you seek to serve Him!
    Martin. :thumbs:
     
  4. justinpastor2youth

    justinpastor2youth
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    Hi. I posted this on another thread but here it is again-with alittle added.
    Best of luck!

    Andersonville Baptist Seminary/College was a great learning experience for me.
    I have studied at regionally accredited schools and found that Andersonville Baptist College's courses were just as challenging as ones from regionally accredited schools.

    Sure it's not Princeton, but the education received at Andersonville will serve a local pastor, youth pastor or Christian Ed. director well in their career. It is not a diploma mill by any means, this is REAL work. I think some confuse diploma mills with legit Christian schools that do not seek Government accreditation because they want to just strictly teach the bible. Regionally accredited schools require alot of general courses ( which are good) but aren't required for pulpit or program ministry.

    If you are looking to get into secular work, then Andersonville probably wouldn't be the best choice for you. To say you have a degree that isn't regionally accredited isn't going to do you much good on your resume. However, at the local church level it will help because after all- you are teaching the bible to their congregation. Andersonville Seminary does a great job with just "sticking with the bible". I guess that's why they don't offer business or computer science degrees. The bible is where they want the focus to be for the student.

    There will be some in the church that will close doors because you didn't go to a regionally accredited school. I can understand this, but it's not right. Alot of times (especially in the south) many churches employ pastors/staff that have graduated from a certain school, not even considering the fact that others schools deliver a quality education also. The same goes with "some" that graduated from all regionally accredited Bible Schools, they don't even entertain the idea that a school that isn't regionally accredited could possibly be preparing students very well for ministry.

    I found it surprising to be in theological discussions with someone that didn't go to a government accredited school alongside someone that graduated from "one of the finest" SBC seminaries. Several times the student that graduated from the "recognized" school was surprised of the knowledge and command of scripture of the student that just graduated from a Bible school that wasn't recognized by the ABHE, TRACS and regionally accrediting associations. So, it's not our job to look down on where someone did or didn't go to school. Maybe it is our job to encourage others in Christ and the ministry that they feel God has called them to.

    I wouldn't say this if the courses weren't thorough and well put together. I will say though that they could work on their presentations for their courses. Some of the lectures were so distorted and poorly recorded that it would be hard to make out at times. But.. this was only a small percentage of the time.

    I believe that the staff and teachers at Andersonville are concerned about people getting a quality education. So, if it's affordable and you don't mind studying strictly from the King James version, then go for it. It will give you a good preparation for ministry.
     
  5. SBCPreacher

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    Well, I'll jump in. I have a Bachelors in music ed. from a state school. Good education. I entered SEBTS and completed half of the M.Div. I finished the rest at Louisiana Baptist Seminary. When I wanted to study further a friend recommended Andersonvile. I really didn't know of the other options out there
    so I entered their Th.D. program (and completed it).

    The pros:
    • I could complete the program could be completed without moving to the school.
    • Conservative (although I'm not KJVO, or even KJV preferred for that matter, and I'm not Fundamental with a capital "F".)

    The cons.
    • No classroom with other students. I really missed that.
    • Not accredited (although that's not a big issue with me).

    I'm not disappointed with doing a program at Andersonville. Would I choose them again? I don't know. There are other great programs out there that can be completed through distance learning.
     
  6. labaptist

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    I got my Associates from Andersonville. I put off going to school for a long time because I am horrible at Math and just about any accredited college will require some sort of a Math course and I didn't want to go into debt for a degree if I didn't think I could complete it. My mom offered to pay for Andersonville straight out when they had some deal that you could get the entire program for around $600.
    There were some courses that were super easy and some that were hard. I'm considering going for my Bachelor's there if I don't transfer to an accredited school. It's not Southern Seminary or Gordon Conwell but there is actual work, and you get what you put into it.
     
  7. nypastor29

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    Went to Andersonville for a time. It started to get fishy for me when I began calling to make payment and they would ask for my CC info without asking for my name. (????) Ok.

    I do got to say that their course work is legit and at times hard. Not enough negatives to be considered a D-Mill.
     

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