Any One Know What the "Bible of the reformation" is?

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by JesusFan, Sep 14, 2011.

  1. JesusFan

    JesusFan
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    wasn't there a Zondervan reformation NIV study bible?
     
  2. Forever settled in heaven

    Forever settled in heaven
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    I doubt there was a Zondervan publishing house in those days, but it would seem obvious that a true Reformation Bible was a new one that stood in opposition to the Onlyist version of that day, the Latin Vulgate.

    Semper Reformanda!
     
  3. convicted1

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    The "bible of the reformation" I do not have a clue. The "bible of the reformed" is easy.....the ESV!!!!:D:D:D:D J/K Brother!!!
     
  4. dan4gsus

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    There was a Reformation Study Bible released by Zondervan a few years again titled, "The Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible". Here is a link from Westminister Bookstore Blog - http://www.westminsterbookstore.com/?p=58

    Evidently, most - not all, material in this Bible is the same as the ESV Reformation Study Bible put out by R.C. Sproul. The Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible adds the Three Forms of Unity in the back.

    The Zondervan Bible has been out of print for a while, you can still buy them secondhand, but be willing to spend more than if you bought a new one.

    Hope that is what you were looking for.
     
  5. Mexdeaf

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    I thought it was the Geneva.
     
  6. JesusFan

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    that IS the Bible that i was referencing!

    Too much money to buy one second hand, so look like I should have bought one while they were in print!
     
  7. robycop3

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    I thought it'd be LUTHER'S. Guess it depends upon when one believes the 'reformation' began.
     
  8. dan4gsus

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  9. Mexdeaf

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    Your guess is better than mine.
     
  10. preachinjesus

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    Such a funny thread. Do you mean right now or what the actual Reformers used?

    Cause that's two different conversations.
     
  11. JesusFan

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    it was a Zondervan published study bible in the NIV!
    saw it years ago, but not since, now that it is out of print, now know reason why!
     
  12. preachinjesus

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  13. JesusFan

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    yes, the first one is the one was asking about!
     
  14. gb93433

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    Well of course the reformers had an English Bible.
     
  15. Van

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    The very idea of a Reformation bible is absurd. The reformers read the Greek. Luther translated the Greek into German. And the people who attended church were largely illiterate, having the mass read in them in a language they did not understand, let alone read.

    Later, as one of the results of the Reformation, and the printing press, Bibles became available to many people. The Geneva bible based on the Tyndale translation became available cira 1600.

    It is indeed sad that the Reformers knew compulsion (either by Rome or Royality) was wrong, that chuch and state should be separated, yet now the Calvinists teach not freedom and choice, but ordained compulsion. As the twig is bent, so grows the tree.
    Augustine's misunderstanding of scripture provided the basis for God advocating compulsion by force rather than persuasion by trustworthy promise. And the sins of the father are visited upon following generations to this day.
     
  16. Mexdeaf

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    Leave it to you to twist a thread completely out of shape.
     
  17. SolaSaint

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    Mex,

    I do beleive it was the Geneva Bible that the reforms used.
     
  18. pilgrim_99

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    Recently I posted a review of the NIV Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible.

    While I think most people who would be interested in this kind of Bible wouldn't be NIV fans, despite the translation I think it has clear advantages over the one edited by Sproul. This one is a revision of the Ligonier production that, in addition to adding the confessions, also has notes that are more thorough in many places. The general editor is Richard L. Pratt, former OT professor at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando and current head of Third Millennium Ministries. I think the NIV Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible is a clear upgrade over the New Geneva/Reformation Study Bible with regard to revised notes, new articles and the addition of the Reformed confessions, the proof texts of which are helpfully referenced in the study notes.

    While the hard copy is out of print and somewhat expensive to obtain (even in hardcover) it has now been issued in electronic format (Kindle, etc.) For a good while you could obtain copies directly from Thirdmill, but they appear to have only Chinese copies at this time.

    I think there are maybe a couple of reasons why it went out of print after five years or so. The first is that it was released at a time (2003) in which Reformed people were deserting the NIV in droves for the ESV. Also, there was (and is) some confusion over what differentiates this Study Bible from the New Geneva/Reformation Study Bible that was first issued in the mid 90's in the NKJV and approximately 10 years later in the ESV. Adding to the confusion is the fact that the ESV Reformation Study Bible was not revised at all, from what I understand, with the exception of adapting it for the ESV.

    No matter what the translation is, I prefer not to use a Study Bible as my main Bible. So in that case the translation is not crucial unless I'm going to want to use it regularly for a group Bible study. As a handy one vol. reference work on Reformed theology, this one is hard to beat. I actually found it to be helpful in making the switch from Presbyterian to Baptist beliefs! But that's a topic for another thread.
     
  19. TCassidy

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    The reformation began, in earnest, in 1517. The first English bible of the reformation was Tyndale's bible of 1525. Martin Luther published his German version in 1534. The Olivetan Bible, in French, was published in 1535. The Geneva (English) didn't come along until 1560.
     
  20. JesusFan

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    seems that it would had been the Bible to make sure one was abreast of just how DoG came into the Church, and one could profit from just that aspect of its study notes!
     

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