Are you of Jewish heritage?

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Gina B, Jun 3, 2011.

  1. Gina B

    Gina B
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    I'm seeking the opinions and advice of those who are of the Jewish bloodline. Of course others opinions are always welcome, but I will be placing higher values on the opinions of those of this race.

    I'm looking at dual membership. I'm a member of a Baptist church and always will be but the desire to be around "my people and traditions" tugs at my heart. Part of it is a desire to return to the sweetness of traditions and allow my daughters to experience a part of their heritage that I've failed to keep up over the last half of their lives. Part of it comes from being in a place where I feel very little identification with those around me. Oklahoma is a different world and I've struggled to feel at home. All this things have played into my decision to try dual membership, remaining a member of my Baptist church while also joining a messianic church. Since the services are held on different days of the week and any commitments I've made with my Baptist church don't fall on that day, it won't interfere.

    When talking with our assistant pastor at the Baptist church, he has no problem with this, but did warn me about being careful about holding traditions in too high regard and consider whether it's the traditions I really am looking for, as repetition often becomes meaningless once it's "programmed in." I understand what he is saying.

    However, in the past when I kept up some of the traditions, I find it very enriching. I'd also love for my children to look a more into who they are and find appreciation for that. They are half Asian and enjoy that, while they barely recognize their Jewish side anymore and one even stated she wished that wasn't part of her. I'm not sure where that came from, apart from her missing her father and really clinging to her Asian heritage as a way to compensate. That really hurt me and made me think that introducing them to the Messianic church will help them find a new appreciation for themselves and a deeper understanding of the roots of Christianity. Before I did this on my own with them, without attending temple, simple recognizing holy days and doing a few small traditional things along with explanations, then dropped it a few years ago.

    What advice might you have for me? I've never regularly attended a Messianic church, when I went to temple before becoming a Christian it was the whole deal, no new testament, true belief in rituals as needed rather than a beautiful reminder of what was and how it was transformed and the law fulfilled through Jesus.

    I don't think those on the outside understand the pull to associate with others and the fullness, the completion one feels and appreciates in the symbolism of what was and what has since been accomplished. I love my Baptist church, just don't feel "complete" right now due to the above mentioned matters.

    But...I'm sure there may be pitfalls to this that I should be aware of and should watch out for. I'd appreciate any input you can give on this matter.
     
  2. David Lamb

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    As you say, Gina, those on the outside (Gentiles, in other words?) probably don't understand the pull of - I was going to say "Judaism", but I don't think that's what you mean - would "Jewish tradition" be right? So I do appreciate why you said you would place more value on the opinions of other Jewish Christians than those of Gentile Christians.

    Yet it seems to me that the New Testament teaches that for Christians, people who are "in Christ", there is now no difference between one whose natural ancestry goes back to Abraham, and those who are Abraham's spiritual descendants. As Paul says in Galatians 3.28-29:
    There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.
    That seems to go against having separate churches for those who are physical descendants of Abraham.

    Could you give some examples of the traditions you wish to return to? Would they (for instance) include keeping the Passover in the Jewish way, and other things which were right for Jews in OT times, but have now been fulfilled in Christ? (Christ our Passover was sacrificed for us - 1 Corinthians 5.7) (PLEASE don't be offended; I am only asking :) ).
     
  3. Earth Wind and Fire

    Earth Wind and Fire
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    Oklahoma ......where the heck do you find good rye bread? & the Jews around me think New Jersey is desert! LOL
     
  4. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
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    I do not believe in "dual" membership. You are part of the body of Christ and you fellowship with a particular assembly of believers (your Baptist church family, I assume)

    ButI would ENCOURAGE you to visit and be friends with a messianic congregation to do just as you say - pass on tradition, celebration, sabbaths, feasts, culture, FOOD, music, clothing, et al as part of your heritage.

    I grew up culturally Jewish (Grandma Millena Margaret Prochaska emigrated from Bohemia to Prague, Nebraska) and had NO religion but some practices. Sort of like Irish on St Patricks Day. Not much. But as a lad I inquired and learned much. Attended Talmud-Torah classes. Visited the synagogue. Learned Yiddish. Grew up in a 50% Jewish, 50% Catholic inner-city neighborhood.

    Later in life, when I found Messianic groups, I was drawn to them. This was "home". We often visited and worshiped together. We taught our children "dual" culture/history. We celebrated feasts together, often lit shabat candles. I am now mid-60's and never miss Pesach Seder, often inviting goyim friends and present church members to learn.

    We are ALL (jews/goyim) of one body. Jesus died for all ethnicities, not "us jews" only. The whole world of people, not just Israel. But even still people often congregate by ethnicity or "comfort level" in a particular church. Example: We have both Christ First Missionary Baptist and Imitate the Image Southern Baptist Church that are 95% Black. Why do they have to have a Black church and not just be part of the other 21 Baptist churches in our town? They are more comfortable with the "culture" of traditional Black worship (actions, music, etc).

    Our church is "family integrated" (kids stay with parents, learn psalms and old hymns) and we attract a certain group "comfortable" with that style of worship . . and noise level!!

    OK I've rambled. Sorry. Did I mention I'm old? ;)
     
  5. Gina B

    Gina B
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    Good grief, I'm tellin' ya, if I HAD a birthright it may just be worth selling in return for a decent loaf of rye bread! I did find one...once. Ate it for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack. Commissary has a habit of discovering my likes and I'm convinced they have me chipped and watch my shopping habits closely, then if they see me get excited over something, THEY QUIT SELLING IT! :laugh:

    I appreciate the input very much. We had a beautiful, meaningful time today and looking forward to Tuesday. Yep, definitely "home." Unlike where I used to go, they used grape juice instead of wine and have individual little cups instead of standing in a circle and passing the cup. We'll continue to go and visit as able and so long as it doesn't interfere with commitments and such at our church here in town. I'll visit more when they get real wine. JUST KIDDING!!!! (hate the taste of it with a passion)

    Perhaps next time I'll ask where to buy rye bread in Oklahoma. :thumbs: And where they get their bagels...thoroughly enjoyed a decent one for the first time in years.

    FOOD!


    Okay, I'll quit with the food.

    Actually I won't. I LOVE THE FOOD! I wanted to hug it and hold it and tell it I missed it. :smilewinkgrin:
     
  6. Jim1999

    Jim1999
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    To each his own, but frankly I believe in the Christian Churches and not a mixture of cultures or foreign belief systems. If one can't be loyal to their home church, get out and go where you can be faithful.

    I am English, but left England in favour of Canada. I must fit the Canadian culture totally, and that is French-English.

    On the Jewish-mix churches, I have seen a strange mixture and confusion of both historical beliefs and common practice. Most of them have been pentecostal in practice more than anything.

    We are to win people to one Jesus Christ, and to one local church.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  7. Old Union Brother

    Old Union Brother
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    Gina,

    Just wondering, What Led you to be a Baptist?

    Peace and prayers
     
  8. Gina B

    Gina B
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    Studying scripture while in the LDS church, realizing I had a false belief system, then seeking out a church that held most closely to scriptural doctrine and where the Holy Spirit led me. Seems to turn out to be a Baptist one no matter where I go.
     

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