Are you ready for an emergency?

Discussion in 'All Other Discussions' started by abcgrad94, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. abcgrad94

    abcgrad94
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    The recent weather problems this winter have gotten me thinking. If your electric and primary heat source went out for a week, what would you do? Do you have a back-up source of heat? Battery operated lights or oil lamps? Enough food to last until the roads become clear again? Water?

    Is your church equipped to help others who might find themselves in this situation? Would you be able to help?

    Just some things to think about.
     
  2. SaggyWoman

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    I wasn't ready for Y2K. I ended up running to the store for a couple of cans of beans and a gallon or two of water. Then I laid up on the couch watching television, and as I saw across the globe the clock tick and nothing bizarre happening, I started eating my beans and drinking my water.
     
  3. Jim1999

    Jim1999
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    I had five years of being bombed out and not knowing if our home would be there the next minute, I don't panic over little things like hydro, heat or even available food. I will manage, and I will survive.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  4. abcgrad94

    abcgrad94
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    I'm sure you could teach us quite a bit from your experiences, Jim.

    So many of us are completely dependent on modern conveniences, we would have a hard time living without them.
     
  5. blackbird

    blackbird
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    While living in Mississippi---we lost electric and water during and after Hurricane Katrina

    I so happened to have a Coleman stove and a gallon of fuel---I set it up outside under the carport on some sawhorses I had and we cooked canned food from the pantry

    I also had a "Cajun" BBQ grill and half a bag of charcoal---plus I gathered limbs and sticks from the yard and we grilled meat from the freezer

    We happened to have several gallons of bottled water

    To tell you the truth----it wasn't all that half bad --- a vacation from electric living wasn't all that bad
     
  6. Palatka51

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    I'd move to Florida. [​IMG]
     
  7. BigBossman

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    Being along the Gulf Coast, hurricanes are a major concern. Anytime a hurricane gets in the Gulf, it intensifies rapidly.

    Generally, I will go to the dollar store & stock up on the "el cheapo" batteries. That's the last place people think to look for them. Since I live in a trailer, getting out of there is always the best option. If I have money saved up, I will reserve a motel room. If I don't (which is usually the case), I will either stay at my parent's apartment or my brother's place.

    I have three cats. If the storm expected to hit is a major one, I'll take them with me. I usually gather my "valuable" belongings. These consist of DVDs, my PS2 and games, & my guns. Of course I'll take my clothing & important documents.

    When the storm blows over, I will go back to my place to see if I have any damage or if I have lost power. If I have no damage & have no power, I will stay where ever I am at until the power comes back on. During Hurricane Ivan, I stayed at the Motel 6 for three days after the strom had hit. So many people were trying to get booked in there that after the third day they couldn't renew my room for another day. About an hour after I got home, the power came back on. I'm thankful that I didn't have to suffer very long.

    During Hurricane Katrina, I stayed at my mom & dad's. My place was without power for a whole week. Since they were in the city limits, their power got restored after two days. I also had a tree in my yard that fell as a result of the storm. It could have fallen in any direction. Thankfully, it fell onto the vacant trailer next door to me. Even then it didn't do any significant damage to it.

    Of course someone stole a gas can I had sitting under my front porch. If it wasn't cracked I would have been upset about it. Next time, I think I will leave a gas can in my yard. Only it will have have sugar-water mixed with just enough gasoline to give it that smell. That'll mess up any engine. Then those thieves will think twice about stealing.
     
  8. annsni

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    We'd do fine. We have gas heat, hot water and stove/oven although the heat won't circulate without power and the oven won't run (electric starter and thermostat) so we'd use the generator to keep the circulator pump going on the furnace. I don't care about lights because we have plenty of oil lamps and flashlights/lanterns that run on batteries. I am just thinking and I should probably get one more battery operated lantern for my big girls upstairs. Candles and lanterns are only allowed in the den and kitchen due to fire risk. For alternate heat, we have 2 fireplaces and one is so big that we can get our den to 90 degrees just through wood fires.

    As for food, we have plenty of food we could cook. With the gas cooktop, I could just about cook any of the food we have in the house and we also have the gas grill if we need it. In the winter, I don't worry about the fridge or freezer since it's usually under 40 degrees outside which is the temperature of a refrigerator. If it's going to be days that we're out, I'll open the freezer and cook whatever meat is in there.

    If any of this happens in the summer, we have a 42 foot sailboat that we'd go on. We have refrigerator, freezer, microwave, oven, stove, showers and lights all unplugged from the grid. We live on it for weeks at a time in the summer anyway so we'd just head over there and do it again. :) We've done it before.
     
  9. Jon-Marc

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    The worst weather we have in this area are high winds and heavy rain. Otherwise, it's sunny and warm most of the time.
     
  10. FriendofSpurgeon

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    Living in a major hurricane zone, this is something that we live with every year. However for us, having no electricity means we are just hot & miserable, not life & death situations like you have up north.

    Most everyone I know has the hurricane drill down pat. You stock up on batteries, food and water. Make sure the gas grill is working. You bring in all of the patio furniture. If you have a boat, you make the necessary precautions. You put up your hurricane shutters. And the list goes on. Also, at the beginning of the season, you do a once over just to make sure that you don't start from zero when a hurricane warning is announced. It's that Boy Scout "be prepared" stuff.

    Like Blackbird, we eat well post-hurricane -- you have to eat all of the meat from the freezer first or it will simply go bad. Actually, we kind of enjoy the post-hurricane time -- assuming that the damage is not bad & the non AC time doesn't last two long. We spend time with our neighbors - jointly cleaning up our yards. We have dinner together -- everyone sharing what is in their freezers. And there's no TV.

    Lastly, our church has a Hurricane Ministry, where we help the elderly & widows prepare for the storms.
     
  11. abcgrad94

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    That is wonderful! Teaching people and helping them to prepare makes for less problems after the storm.

    One thing I have learned is, always carry a blanket in the trunk in case my car breaks down or I get stuck in traffic and need to turn off the car for a while to save gasoline. In winter it will keep you warm, and in summer it's handy for wrapping my yard sale finds.

    Our area is prone to flooding. The last time it flooded here, our church parking lot was used for people to park their cars away from the water.
     
  12. BigBossman

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    Flooding is no fun. While I haven't experienced having my home flooded out, I can only imagine what that would be like. I have often joked about putting a giant floatation device around the edges of my trailer, so when the waters rise, my trailer will float. That'll never happen.
     
  13. John Toppass

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    We just went through hurricane Ike. Galveston Island is still recovering. We stayed at home took lots of pics of storm and damage. I was out in the eye at 4:15 am, I know that was stupid. We lost power for 23 days some folks even longer. I store 100 gallons of gas during hurricane season and have a 5500 watt generator. Between normal pantry supplies and MREs, the two of us could eat for about 3 months but we alway share. We make the best of it and yes, it is somewhat fun but your always glad it is over. We do not think that FEMA is responsible to take care of us, most folks around here don't either. I am thankful for the blessings during this time. There are many if you just look.

    We spent a lot of our time checking on older folks and delivering ice and supplies to them. (as much as we could)
     
    #13 John Toppass, Feb 24, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 24, 2009
  14. Melanie

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    Had another earthquake the other day here in the Wobbly Isles....the Civil Defence bangs on about "Be Prepared" echos of Akila and the Cub Scouts. I guess I will eventually get a pail and fill it with the suggested survival gear. Being an impracticle body....as long as I have Bible, rosary ( I am a Mick) and an ipod...I feel I can survive if that is the Will of the Lord.:thumbsup:
     

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