As a British Jew, growing antisemitism makes me feel that I am no longer safe

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Ps104_33, Jan 11, 2009.

  1. Ps104_33

    Ps104_33
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2001
    Messages:
    4,005
    Likes Received:
    0
    "I am a secular, liberal, identifying British Jew. My parents would have taken great pleasure if my acting talents had landed me a starring role in the primary school nativity play; on Christmas Day, we gather at home eating smoked salmon bagels and mince pies. There is no conflict whatsoever between my religion and nationality. On the contrary, they have always supported and echoed one another in terms of the values and moral structure they promote. Judaism has taught me to value liberalism, education, tolerance, family and charity. All Jewish religious services and celebrations include a heartfelt toast to the Queen, because Jews in this country have felt safe, well-assimilated and, most of all, grateful."
    In August 2001, I turned 21 and my parents gave me a Star of David necklace. Then a month later, the world changed and my mother, with remarkable foresight, began her campaign to rescind the gift, begging me to take it off because she was frightened it would make me a target in the wake of mounting evidence that fanatical Islamism was tightening its grip on the country. My argument was always the same - when I am no longer safe being identifiably Jewish on the tube, I don't want to live in England."

    (btw the "tube" is what they call their subway system, not the TV)

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/jan/11/gaza-britain-judaism-antisemitism
     
    #1 Ps104_33, Jan 11, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2009
  2. LadyEagle

    LadyEagle
    Expand Collapse
    <b>Moderator</b> <img src =/israel.gif>
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Messages:
    22,028
    Likes Received:
    1
    :tear: :tear: :tear:
     
  3. Jim1999

    Jim1999
    Expand Collapse
    <img src =/Jim1999.jpg>

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    15,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am not surprised. Where I grew up in East London, it was famous for chippies (the fish and chip wagons), the open market and our Cockney language. To-day..we were over three years ago..one had to leave London to buy fish and chips, the open markets were virtually gone and if one wanted to speak Cockney, he had to do it with an Indian accent. My last aunt to live in East London has now moved out into Essex where all the other old Cockneys are going. Not sure I would want to live there anymore and I am not Jewish.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  4. carpro

    carpro
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    20,949
    Likes Received:
    299
    I think i'll write him and invite him to come live in North Central Texas.

    I can't promise zero anti-semitism, but he'll be as safe as any of us. :thumbs:
     
  5. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
    Expand Collapse
    <img src =/curtis.gif>

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2001
    Messages:
    20,264
    Likes Received:
    4
    You sure can string a bunch of words together. I want to laugh, but it's really not that funny.

    Did you like "MY Fair Lady" ? I've seen a stage presentation several times.
     
  6. Jim1999

    Jim1999
    Expand Collapse
    <img src =/Jim1999.jpg>

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    15,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    Bro. Curtis, I loved My Fair Lady...The lead bloke in that stage performance was a Cockney, you know. The original performance was as Cockney as one could be........but they made it legible for "outsiders".

    Go ahead and laugh, mate. It is good for the soul, so says the scriptures.

    Cheers,

    Jim

    Did I ever mention why I always sign off with "cheers"? It is the most common form of greeting in England and it is next to impossible to say without getting a silly grin from the mouth.
     

Share This Page

Loading...