August - Reading 13

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Aaron, Aug 13, 2002.

  1. Aaron

    Aaron
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  2. Aaron

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    Luke 17:11-19

    Thankfulness is one of the key character qualities of a Christian, and the narrative of the ten lepers is a reminder of how rare that quality is.

    One of the reasons explicitly stated for the wrath of God being manifest from heaven is unthankfulness, Rom. 1:21. Remember to give thanks for all things, for this is the will of God concerning you, 1 Thess. 5:18.
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

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    Good morning -

    There is little to comment upon in Nehemiah today except to say that the work and the vigilance continues despite the heavy opposition to the reconstruction by Nehemiah's enemies. We see more of Nehemiah's administrative abilities in his willingness to delegate authority to Hanani and Hananiah. The very last verse of the chapter, however, leads into one of the most emotional passages in the Bible, in my opinion.

    In addition to Aaron's comments on Luke 17:11-19 I will add that it would appear that the Samaritan leper received not only physical healing, but spiritual as well. Even though the Samaritans were despised by the Jews, leperosy created a new social caste in which both Jews and Samaritans alike were ostrasized.

    In the second chapter of 2Timothy Paul gives Timothy three similes of the Christian laborer. (1) the soldier, (2) the athlete, and (3) the farmer. These three examples point to different characteristics of the Christian. First the ability to obey commands, second the ability to follow rules, and third the ability to work hard. The reader should bear in mind that Paul is giving this advice while shackled to a young man of whom he was very fond. The spread of the Gospel and the preservation of its message was of paramount importance to these early Christians. Their fervor is why we still have it.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  4. peaches-ohio

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    I am just starting, and really into the new testament. Is there somewhere for newbies? It isn't that I don't want to read the old testament, I am just so exited about the new testament.
     
  5. Clint Kritzer

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    The Bible is such a vast peice of literature that in a way, we're ALL kind of newbies at this, peaches. You are certainly free to join in on this forum at anytime and ask questions or pose your own thoughts and observations. There's nothing mandatory here so if you wanted to read just the New Testament Scriptures, that is strictly up to you.

    As you can see, we're well into the Gospel of Luke, but we will be beginning the very compassionate writing of John beginning in October. It is my hope that this program will continue next year as well so no matter what point you begin, in a year's time you will have finished the Bible.

    I might also recommend that you read the Epistle of Romans as you are a relatively new believer. That Book is geared toward those new in the faith. The commentaries from that Letter begin here: http://www.baptistboard.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=33&t=000073&p=

    By all means, we will find some way to accommodate you on this board if it is your desire to read from the Word of God.
     
  6. Aaron

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    peaches,

    By all means start with the New Testament. Enough of the Old Testament is taught in the New Testament to understand the Way of Salvation, but the Old Testament is not properly understood without the New. You will find the Old and New Testaments summarized in the Sermon on the mount, Matt. 5, 6 & 7.

    For learning the Old Testament, finding a quality Children's Bible and reading the Bible stories from the Old Testament in it will give you a solid general knowlegde of its content in a relatively short time. (Hey, I read the Children's Bible sometimes!)

    God speed!
     
  7. Aaron

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    This is a good point. Another lesson taught by this narrative is that no external manipulations can change a man's heart. It is a common but erroneous notion that afflictions are the spawning ground of good character. That is only true for those who have the Spirit of Christ in them. Paul is speaking to Christians when he said, "Tribulation worketh patience," Rom. 5:3. Those without the Spirit will only grow more bitter in their enmity toward God (Rev. 9:20-21). Only one leper returned to give thanks.
     
  8. Sherrie

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    Hello Aaron and Clint Kritzer!

    So I am new to this Bible Study. How does this work? The day before you give scripture ...we read it ....and then we discuss it the next day? or what is it we are doing? And so for now what is it we are studying? Women are allowed...right?

    I am so glad there is this board. I love Bible Study! I don't know who...but thanks!
     
  9. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Hi Sherrie -

    We started this program January 1 of this year. We are following a pre-set schedule of Scripture readings which you can find by clicking the link at the bottom of any page on the BB entitled "Bible Reading Plan." Each month has 25 readings. The extra 5 or 6 days allow us to get ahead, catch up or rest.

    Each day, a moderator (or anyone else if we haven't gotten to it [​IMG] ) posts the Sriptures for that day and all commentary is more than welcome. Most of us work, so the commentaries usually occur about this time of night. I am then in the habit of posting the following day's schedule for any folks who do not know where to find the link or use the links to the Passages for their reading. This way we still leave the preceeding days thread in view from the index page.

    This forum is not for debate, per se. This is strictly an encouragement for those who wish to read the entire Bible in a scheduled way. You can think of it as a support group.

    Are women welcome? LOL Yeah, I think we all like women here! [​IMG] As for the thanks, the idea was Helen's and the forum was instituted by the webmaster. You are certainly welcome to join in at any point you see fit.
     
  10. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lecture - 4/25/04 part I

    2 Timothy 2

    After laying a considerable foundation in chapter 1 drawing on the examples of Timothy's family and his own experience, Paul now turns his attention directly towards Timothy and exhorts him to duty.

    2Timothy 2:1-7 Be Faithful and Endure Suffering

    The "You then (KJV - Thou therefore)" of verse 1 is emphatic. The original Greek rarely used personal pronouns. The term "grace" in the phrase "in the grace that is in Christ Jesus" is not being used in a theological sense, but rather instrumental, as if to say "by means of".

    Timothy is instructed to prepare others just as Paul prepared him. These should be "faithful men who should be able to teach others also." We have here an embryonic form of succession. This succession, however, is not what we would term an "apostolic succession," but rather a handing down of the message of the Gospel and personal revelation through a succession of people who would handle it responsibly.

    In verse 3 Timothy is encouraged to take his share of suffering like a good soldier and in verses 4-6 Paul uses three similes to serve as models for the young minister. Interestingly, Paul uses the same three examples in 1Corinthians 9 to make an entirely different point - his conduct among the Corinthians and to meet the objections to his Apostleship. 1Corinthians 9:7; 1Corinthians 9:24 (Read ESV 4-6)

    Each of these three figures - the soldier, the athlete and the farmer - are examples of perseverance. The example of the soldier conveys three points: (1) resolute endurance of hardship, (2) avoidance of entanglements that hinder his duties and (3) the desire to please the one who enlisted him. For the Christian soldier, these are all owed to Christ.

    The athlete simile stresses the need for faithful discipline. The reference to adhering to rules may refer to the Greek athletes of the Olympics who not only had to compete by set guidelines during competition, but also swore an oath that they had trained for ten months prior to the games. Accepting this interpretation, the proverb is stating that in order to claim the prize, the Christian must accept the responsibility of discipline.

    The example of the farmer brings to mind the qualities of hard workmanship and patience. Just as the farmer could expect to be the first to benefit from his toil, so too the hard working minister could expect a reward for his labors.

    In verse 7 Paul interrupts his dialogue to interject a parenthetical comment as if to say, "Are you listening?" He assures Timothy that should he have difficulty understanding any of these instructions, the Lord will give him comprehension. True comprehension, as opposed to human skill in understanding, is a divine gift.

    2Timothy 2:8-13 Remember the Faithfulness of Christ

    Paul's final encouragement to Timothy's faith stems from the message of the Gospel itself. Jesus Christ, descended from David, is risen from the dead. The reference to the Davidic line indicates an early Jewish-Christian origin and the formula is used elsewhere in the Pauline Epistles as well. Romans 1:3-4

    Paul states once again that he is bound or in fetters. Some have translated the phrase "wherein I am bound" as modifying "Jesus Christ" interpreting the sentence to say that Paul identifies himself mystically with Christ as He too was bound and tried. While such postulation is credible and worthy of merit, the most natural interpretation is that it is for the Message of the Gospel to which Paul is referring.

    Despite his circumstances, however, the Message for which he was bound was not bound at all! This Gospel, which is the word of God, is almost personified in this verse and God Himself goes surety for it. 1Peter 1:22-25

    Because of his confidence in this surety (therefore) Paul endures all hardships for the sake of the elect. The elect, a term used frequently in the New Testament, refers to those who are chosen and predestined in God's eternal purpose (Matthew 24:31). In this context, Paul is not necessarily referring to the already converted Christian, but more so the potential Christian. His efforts, suffering and perseverance are so that a fuller number of the elect may be brought to salvation.

    These comments on his own predicament and the eternal purpose of God stir to memory a hymn that Paul quotes in verses 11-13a. This is considered by most scholars to be an early baptismal hymn as is attested by the first line and its echo in Romans 6:8. Baptism represents the dying to self as we are immersed (notice the past tense) and this death will be rewarded in sharing the Resurrection. The second line echoes the words of Christ repeated several times in the Gospels, "He who endures to the end will be saved." The third line warns against denial. This also reflects the words of Christ in Matthew 10:33. The fourth line softens the harshness of the third showing God's great mercy. The final phrase of verse 13 "He can not deny Himself" are believed to be a Pauline addition or afterthought commenting on the hymn.

    At this point beginning in verse 2:14 and continuing until nearly the end of the Epistle in verse 4:5 Paul gives specific counsels to Timothy. It is in this Passage that we gain more insight into the problem in Ephesus and perspective on church discipline.
     
  11. Clint Kritzer

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    Sunday School lesson – 1/2/05 - continued

    Luke 17:11-19 The Healing of Ten Lepers

    To some scholars, this Passage indicates the beginning of the final leg of the “journey” section of Luke, 9:51-19:40. The phrasing is somewhat difficult to translate but the general sense is that Jesus is now moving along the frontier between Samaria and Galilee. It is assumed by many that after the rejection by the Samaritan village in 9:52, Jesus began the circuitous route through Perea on the eastern side of the Jordan River. Luke in fact has Him entering Judea through the border town of Jericho. The important point, literately speaking, is that He is moving towards Jerusalem and into the final facet of His earthly mission.

    Leprosy amongst all the cultures of the New Testament time created a caste that transcended ethnic borders. In this Passage we find ten people who had formed a group because of their illness. This group was an ethnic mixture of Jews and Samaritans. Lepers were separated by not only social stigmas but by the Law as well (Leviticus 13:46). The ten lepers stand at a distance and raise their voices to implore healing of the Christ. The term “Master” is a Lukan phrase found elsewhere only stated by the Disciples. It is a synonym for “Rabbi.”

    Rather than an act of healing, Jesus answers their pleas with a command: go show yourself to the priests. Once again, according to the Law recorded in Leviticus, the healed leper must show himself to a priest who would confirm that he was ready for reintegration into society. Therefore, Jesus command is thereby a call for faith. The lepers must go to the priests confident that prior to their arrivals they will be healed. All ten obey and all ten are healed.

    Only one, however, a Samaritan, upon discovering that he is cured returns to Jesus to express his gratitude. As he returns he is praising God and upon finding Jesus he falls at His feet giving homage to the instrument of the miracle. The Jewish lepers had accepted the cure as being due them. Only the Samaritan received it as Grace. The Samaritan, as a foreigner, underlines the Lukan motif of God’s Grace through Jesus Christ extending to all nations.

    All ten lepers believed in God and miracles or they would not have asked Christ for healing. Jesus telling the man that his faith had made him well therefore teaches us another facet of faith is the recognition of Grace. Therefore gratitude is a manifestation of this element of faith. The Samaritan was the only one of the group to recognize God’s goodness and the relationship between Jesus and God’s act in his life. He was the only one of the ten who truly had a saving faith.
     
  12. Clint Kritzer

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