B.M.A. history?

Discussion in 'Baptist History' started by chris_price, Jul 4, 2004.

  1. chris_price

    chris_price
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    Does any one know of any links to B.M.A. history. I whould like to read more on the Baptist Missionary Assocaition.
     
  2. Singing Cop

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  3. rlvaughn

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    I don't think there's a whole lot of historical information online. Here are some bits of which I am aware:
    BMA of America
    S. A. Hayden - the "Hayden-Cranfill" controversy played into the beginning of the Baptist Missionary Association of Texas. Also, I think the article may be incorrect that Hayden ever completely aligned himself with the BMA, but I'd have to check on that.
    A little history on Jacksonville College
    A little history on BMATS

    You also might find something on the BMA of Texas website - BMA TX
     
  4. rsr

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  5. rlvaughn

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    Chris, a couple of books you can probably find at the BMATS library concerning BMA history - History of the Baptist Missionary Association of Texas by W. H. Parks of Cleburne, TX, and A History of the Baptist Missionary Association of Texas from 1900 to 1953 by R. C. Vance. I think that's where I found them; if not, you might check Jacksonville College or SFA. Parks was present at the formation, and Vance wrote his as a master's thesis.

    Stephen, that may be right about Hayden. I remember Parks writing that Hayden told them their formation of a new association was "a blunder". He thought the convention would come around - or maybe he just wanted to keep fighting.

    A couple of interesting things that sometimes get glossed over: (1) Presentations of the Hayden controversy as a "Landmark controversy" often tend to make people think it was landmarkism versus anti-landmarkism. It was really a controversy within Landmarkism. I think most of his leading opponents - Cranfill, Gambrell, Carroll, et al. - must rightly be considered "Landmarkers" as well. (2) The BMA split affected a large minority of churches in Texas. By the 1904 Dallas meeting, 563 churches were represented by messenger (that is more churches than they have today). Internal friction and a strong campaign by the BGCT for unification (to win back "straying" churches and ministers) may have kept the BMA from reaching a strength nearly rivaling the BGCT.
     
  6. rsr

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    I ran across this work by Dr. Philip Bryan, former president of the Jacksonville seminary. Chapter IV specifically deals with the BMA Texas and other associations. As you noted, "Landmark issues appear to have been the basis of the controversy, although Landmarkers were on both sides of the question."

    An Analysis of the Ecclesiology of Associational Baptists, 1900-1950
     
  7. rufus

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    I've been a BMA preacher and pastor for 36 years.

    Dr. John Duggar wrote The Baptist Missionary Association of America 1950-1986

    He discusses the descent of the BMA from the Old General Baptist Association, the ABA Association and the change of name from NABA to BMA.

    Baptist Publishing House
     
  8. Mark Osgatharp

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    A lot of the ABA people who were around when "the split" occured refer to the BMA as "Nabbers" - a play on the "NABA" and the perception (whether real or imagined) that the NABA was "stealing" churches from the ABA.

    Mark Osgatharp
     
  9. rufus

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    A lot of the ABA people who were around when "the split" occured refer to the BMA as "Nabbers" - a play on the "NABA" and the perception (whether real or imagined) that the NABA was "stealing" churches from the ABA.

    Mark Osgatharp
    </font>[/QUOTE]A careful study of the issues would dispel that myth, Mark! [​IMG]
     
  10. chris_price

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    Thanks for the help guys. I tried to veiw Dr. Bryan's page, but my web filter (afa filter)blocks it because geocities supports/allows pornography. I also found some info on the Baptist Progressunder History.
     
  11. Southern

    Southern
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    Chris,
    I would also recommend the book that Rufus proposed by Dr. John Duggar. I have this book but be very careful about some of the groups he lists as "Baptist" from the middle ages, etc., but the history of the BMA as an organization is pretty thorough.

    In Christ,
    Bobby
     
  12. El_Guero

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    Interesting history Wall Doctor ...

    Let me see if I get some of these fast balls ... and don't loose track of the curve balls ... And can still put all of this history together ...

    ... So, the Ariminians (First Baptists) were in Holland ...

    Some Englishmen left the reformed theology of the Church of England and went to Holland and caught the faith. There they became an "English congregation" of these earlier Dutch speaking Baptists. They chose a faith that was opposed to the Reformed Theology of the Church of England.

    Some of the English speaking church group went back to England to plant churches. Upon arrival back in England, these believers were severely persecuted for their new faith by the Reformed Church of England. Some of these decided that English politics were still to dangerous and decided to leave for America?

    So, what happened to these Englishmen that went to Holland for religious freedom and then came to the colonies (along with some Dutchmen)... ?

    So when did these believers change from early Baptist theology back to reformed theology? Was it before they left Holland? Was when their ship landed in the wrong place?

    Do the history books say when the five (5) Winslow brothers changed their faith? Or, was it their descendent that changed to a reformed theology?

    Hmmm ... I wonder if all of their Baptist descendents remained Baptists ... Or, did their descendents rejoin the Reformed churches ...

    I get it - It had to be the cabin boy that was predestined to bring the change in theology upon the family?
    ... (hint: he was an early type of butler)
    ... And the butler always gets blamed ...
    ... (hint: the cabin boy was a french Huguenot)
    ... (hint ... one of the cabin boy's descendants married a Winslow.)

    This marriage was predestined so that the early colonists would chose to change to the theology of the Reformed Church of England.

    So were they predestined to flee the Church and then choose to go back? Or were they predestined to flee from God's will of a Reformed Church...
    ... Just a guess and a question or two...
    ... an educated guess
    ... It is in the history books - right?
    ... I mean, "Aren't historians devoted to telling the whole story and not just the part they want to tell?"

    ;o)

    In Christ,

    Wayne
    "I have often "wondered" what it is that God has predestined me to ... I can only thank Him that He graciously allowed me to choose His destiny in my life ..." Attributed to W. W. Royce ...
     
  13. El_Guero

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    I guess, I had two windows open and the post went to the most recent ...

    But, upon the Missionary Baptists - There are two major groups and often those of us that are not involved will accidently get them mixed up.

    Wayne
     
  14. rsr

    rsr
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    The evidence is that the predominant views of early American Baptists was Reformed and that this continued until the the early 20th century.

    The Church of England was only briefly Reformed, and that at the point of a musket.
     
  15. Bro.Bill

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    What happened to the discussion of B.M.A. history?
     
  16. El_Guero

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    All,

    Sorry about the misdirection ... I just learned about editing a blooper - but, it is too late.
     
  17. El_Guero

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    Chris,

    I can get you more info about the BMA if you wish. I have thought about going to their seminary.

    Wayne
     

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