Blood

Discussion in 'All Other Discussions' started by wpe3bql, Jun 6, 2015.

  1. wpe3bql

    wpe3bql
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    Today (06/06) I started working on my 14th gallon blood donation for the American Red Cross. The blood drive was at a nearby CofC (the same place where I go to vote). It was a little busy there because they also were running a community food pantry as well as a car wash.

    I started giving blood in 1970. My aunt was being operated for a very serious heart operation, and her hospital called many of her relatives to donate blood so that her hospital doctors' bills would be somewhat less.

    About two years later, the company where I was working at the time sponsored a Red Cross drive on its manufacturing site. I figured, well, why not. There was already a big line, but since the company allotted its employees time to participate, I was [I thought] "good to go."

    I donated by first pint that day, but when I returned to work, my boss said he needed to see me privately. RESULT: "Son, we're gonna have to lay you off." :thumbs:

    Actually my layoff had nothing to do with my blood donation. It had more to do with them having to deal with the effects of a UAW strike that lasted 6 months--during which our work was merely farmed out to brother unions such as those of the unionized electrical workers.

    Anyhow, God was leading me to leave PA to go to TN to attend a Bible college there, so He "worked things out for me" :godisgood: in that case.

    As I got established in TN [Not too far from Ft. Campbell KY, Salty!], I began donating there as often as I could.

    Then I moved to Music City TN in the early 1990's to work for what used to was BellSouth (now it's AT&T), and the center in which I worked had Red Cross blood drives right on site.

    That's a fairly concise summary of my dealings with the Red Cross.

    Have any of you BB folks given blood?

    Do you have any interesting experiences doing so?

    (I sorta look at it this way.....Jesus gave His blood for me, so if/when, I can why not take an hour or so to give a pint of my blood for someone.)
     
  2. Salty

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    I see no need to jump out of a perfectly working airplane.!

    In Basic Training- I was volunteered to give blood. They poked me 3 times and could not find a vein. Even today - the VA has trouble finding a vein - when they need to take a blood sample are put in an IV
     
  3. wpe3bql

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    If you'd cut down on your 50+ donuts per day at your job, maybe your veins wouldn't be as clogged up and they could find them when they need to jab you.

    Also, jumping out of a perfectly good airplane helps your blood that's all gelled up in your size 17AAA feet.
     
  4. Gina B

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    I used to donate. I quit after a number of years because they started this new thing where they take the normal amount, then take a bit more in a separate bag. I forget the reason, but my vein gets really slow at the end of the regular donation.
    The guy taking blood did not tell me about the extra amount until he was already setting up to take it. I told him no on the extra and asked him to take the needle out. He wouldn't and kept saying "it is just a little extra." But I knew my vein would quit, and it did. My vein collapsed shortly after he started trying to get extra, and it bruised super bad. That hurt for days!
    So I never donated again, since he had said it was required, and my body can't give that much. Plus it made me very mad that he did not take the needle out when I requested him to!!!
    Now I can't because of my health. But it makes me sad that I could have give for a good decade more if that had not happened. They certainly need the donations!
    Now my daughter donates. My other two do not meet the weight requirement, plus the one has tiny hidden veins. The doc had to send her to IV therapy for a normal blood draw so they could use imaging to guide the needle. One time it took 3 months to get enough blood from this tiny girl! It was nuts.
    So no donations from those ones.
     
  5. Salty

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  6. wpe3bql

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    GinaB--- I believe that the blood "samples" the ARC takes after your actual donation are for some kind of testing and/or research.

    Although you're no longer able to donate, you at least can be glad that the ARC is concerned enough to have such high standards as they do.

    Not every kind of blood donation organizations do.
     
  7. Gina B

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    High standards are great, but instead of losing donations, wouldn't it be wiser to use some of the blood already taken, if a person cannot go beyond for the extra?
     
  8. wpe3bql

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    I just finished calling the ARC to find out exactly what is/are the purpose(s) of those additional blood samples.

    After a 12-minute conversation with ARC, I was told that they use them to detect the possibility of the presence of various forms of hepatitis, HIV, and other such blood-born diseases. They do this not only to preclude giving these diseases to anyone who would need ARC blood, but also to notify you (the donor) that they've detected the presence of one/more of these diseases in your blood.

    If I had one/more of these blood-borne diseases, I'd sure like to know about it, wouldn't you?
     
  9. Sapper Woody

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    I am a universal donor, so I feel it's my responsibility to donate. Unfortunately, it will be several years before I can donate, due to deployments.
     
  10. Gina B

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    Yes, I certainly would, and I am glad they take those measures. Did they tell you why they can't take it from the regular donation for those of us who can't give that much?
    I know the amount they take for that seems trivial, but it really does push the limits for a few of us. Maybe it's not enough of us to make it a concern. I just thought it was a shame that it stopped any donations at all. Around that time period only one other donor I spoke to had the same issue, and a friend who donated didn't have her vein collapse, but felt dizziness she didn't have before and didn't want to donate anymore. So that's only three out of many donors.
     
  11. wpe3bql

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    Yes, Gina, they did.

    The actual donation that a person gives each time they donate can only be one pint, and one pint only.

    Regardless of one's physical conditions, donating more than one pint at a time puts your body at risk for medical/physical problems.

    The ARC has determined that this policy reduces the possibility of them subsequently being held liable in court for problems that donor may encounter.

    IOW, this is why the ARC has elected to "err on the side of caution." :applause:
     

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