British recipes. . .need help

Discussion in 'Women's Public Fellowship Forum' started by abcgrad94, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. abcgrad94

    abcgrad94
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    I want to prepare some recipes, but need some help. What is tripe? What is silt? Or ammonia, used in baking? These were used in wartime recipes but I have no idea what they are or how to find them. Also, how do you convert cups to grams, etc? Some recipes call for grams of sugar or flour. Thanks.
     
  2. Gayla

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    Tripe is the lining of a cow's (or is it pig's) stomach. I've seen it in the meat department.

    There has been a link posted to a recipe called "Bangers and Mash" here before. I've made it several times and we really like it. It is sausages in a dark brown gravy with onion, then topped with mashed potatoes and baked long enough to brown the potatoes a bit. YUMMY!
    I'll do a search and post the link if'n I fiind it.
     
  3. Gayla

    Gayla
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    Here's the link to a Bangers and Mash recipe.

    I took the advice of some of the reviewers and used two packages of the gravy mix. One with onion and one without.

    If you're so inclined, guess you could make the gravy yourself. Could definitely control the salt that way. Those packets of gravy mix are salty!!
     
  4. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K)
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    Yeah, but your sausages are not the same you miss some of the goodness :).
     
  5. I Am Blessed 24

    I Am Blessed 24
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    PM Gwyneth, she will be happy to help you.
     
  6. Gayla

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    Ooops! I forgot the link.

    http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Bangers-and-Mash/Detail.aspx
     
  7. Gayla

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    Reckon I could Google and find a mail-order source?
     
  8. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K)
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    I know there are no easy gram to cup conversions because of the density of the ingedients.

    Here are some key conversions

    Here is another good chart

    You could also buy a set of kitchen scales. We have lived here for a few years and have US and UK/Irish recipes. We also use cups and a kitchen scale.
     
    #8 NaasPreacher (C4K), Apr 4, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 4, 2008
  9. Gwyneth

    Gwyneth
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    Amonia was used to clean cast iron pans...... I don`t think it was for consumpion though..............eeeeeeeek!!!!! When you say silt .... do you mean suet? Suet is the solid fat found under the "chin" of cattle. They used to buy it and shred it to use in pastry.... makes a lovely pie crust especially on rabbit pie. I sometimes make suet dumplings, and leeky pud. also suet jam roly poly, sometimes I make `trolleys `(raisins and currants in suet roll) this is very tasty , and if allowed to go cold, this is sliced and warmed in a frying pan no extra fat required. I have a copy of Mrs Beetons cook book (priced one shilling) new edition dated 1906.
    Gwyneth

    http://www.allthatwomenwant.com/index.htm
    this is a wartime recipe page
    http://uk.wrs.yahoo.com/_ylt=A1f4cf...bout.com/od/foodhistory/a/heirloomrecipes.htm


    http://homecooking.about.com/library/weekly/blcalculator.htm
    and here are places where you will find a conversion chart for old recipies.

    Hope this is of some help
     
    #9 Gwyneth, Apr 4, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 4, 2008
  10. Karen

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    Gwyneth,
    I absolutely love the cheese scones that some UK bakeries sell.
    Do you know of any simple recipe for them that a cooking-challenged person like me could fairly easily do?
     
  11. abcgrad94

    abcgrad94
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    Thanks for all your help. One recipe calls for silt. I wonder if it's an old word for suet?
     
  12. Gwyneth

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    #12 Gwyneth, Apr 4, 2008
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  13. abcgrad94

    abcgrad94
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    I think I finally figured it out. It looks like the word is supposed to be "salt" and was misspelled. Anyway, salt is what I'll use in the recipe and I'm sure it will turn out right.
     

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